Freelancing Websites: A New Copywriter’s Best Friend?

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Dean Mackenzie 

     

    When it comes to winning copywriting jobs, freelance platforms generally get a bad rap.

    But, that doesn’t mean you should shy away from them, like you would a dead mouse in a Mountain Dew can. (Yeah, that was a thing.)

    There are some good reasons to use freelance jobs sites, especially when you’re starting out. 

    In this post I’m going to share five reasons why the Upworks of the world could actually help you break into the wonderful world of copywriting, along with three easy ways to establish yourself on these websites.

     

    When most copywriters hear the words “Upwork” or “Freelancer”, they generally have one thought:

    But I’m here to say that ,while freelance job websites aren’t a sparkly dreamland of rainbows and unicorns, they’re not all bad either.

     

    “We get no respect”

    To paraphrase the comedian Rodney Dangerfield, freelancing websites get no respect from ‘true’ copywriters and content writers.

    Why not? Well, let’s look at some of the popular perceptions:

    • Only new, desperate or sub-standard copywriters float around such sites
    • These copywriters desperately scratch for whatever pickings they can find
    • The jobs they fight over are usually the out-of-their-mind “ten dollars for a thousand words” type

    And to some degree, that’s all true.

    There are a lot of new and under-performing copywriters hanging around freelancing platforms.

    They do ‘low ball’ to score whatever job they can.

    And clients are often looking for jobs that are cheap and fast, with scant regard to nasty.

    But guess what? For most genuine copywriters, that’s a good thing.

    Working in this kind of environment, as icky and unpleasant as it sounds, delivers some great experience and lessons. Lessons that are starkly relevant once the copywriter breaks out of their cocoon and emerges into the real world.

    But let’s dig a little deeper.

     

    Why freelancing websites don’t completely suck

     

    1. They’re a perfect place to build experience

    As a new copywriter, it can be hard to get clients.

    You might have read books, done courses, and snagged the odd job off a friend or family member. But you still end up hearing this:

    What’s a copywriter cub to do?

    Well, you’re going to need practice. Lots of it. As quickly as you can.

    Freelance writing platforms are positively bulging with opportunities to sharpen your copywriting skills.

    One of my first jobs on Upwork was writing bi-weekly insurance blogs (yeah, fascinating subject) for ten dollars an hour.

    Looking back, those posts weren’t my greatest work. But working on them for a couple of months improved my glacial writing speed no end.

    Almost every job I did during my first 6-9 months on the platform taught me something. And I carry those lessons with me to this day.

    Bonus experience benefit

    Many clients don’t hire people sight unseen. If they come to you, they’ve either checked out your blogs, know of your work elsewhere, or will ask for some samples. Deliver first-class copy and content with those first jobs and you’ll quickly build a portfolio you’ll be proud to show prospective clients.

     

    2. It lets you develop your business

    Upwork (and other freelance writing websites) have a particular policy that’s gotten more than a few freelancers in trouble:

    You can’t steal clients from Upwork and into your tender bosom.

    Doing so will get you ingloriously booted off their site as soon as they find out.

    But this doesn’t mean you can’t be working on your business in practically every other way.

    Platforms such as these let you develop almost everything you’ll need when you strike out into the brave new world beyond:

    • Processes: How will you get the info you need from a client? How do you handle unresponsiveness? How do you tackle feedback?
    • Clients: Who are your ideal clients? What traits do you like in them? How do you deal with ‘pain in the you-know-what’ (PITA) clients?
    • Marketing: How will you stand out from the competition? (More on that in a mo.)

    3. You can practice your pitch

    When you’ve got oodles of current clients or referrals flooding in, you’re set.

    But when you need to hunt for clients, you’ll be pitching.

    A lot.

    As a new copywriter, you need to sell yourself.

    On Upwork, this takes the form of proposals. If you see a job that sounds like a perfect match, you write a ‘proposal  (i.e. an eloquentified message that’s basically, “Pick me, pick me!”) and hope they get back to you.

    A lot of copywriters hate proposal writing because:

    1. a) it takes time
    2. b) there’s no guaranteed return
    3. c) it’s freaking hard to do

    Fortunately, a lot of writers lazily use a copy/paste approach. So if you’re prepared to put in a little work and refine your proposals over time, you’ll start winning work.

    The truth is, until you’re established on Upwork you have to do a lot of pitching.

    The nice part is this can and does turn around. When you have the experience and the results, clients will start to approach you.

    When I started, my pitch wasn’t much more than:

     “I’m a copywriter. Your job sounds great. Why don’t you hire me?”

    I’m actually surprised it won any jobs at all.

    But as I slowly worked out how to market myself, these proposals became more conversational. I asked more questions, and talked about how I’d theoretically go about doing their job.

    Pro tip: Clients love it when you give feedback on their projects from the get-go. It can be a lot of extra effort, but if you find a job you really want to win it’s a great strategy.

     

    4. You can actually build relationships

    On freelance writing sites, jobs are usually one-off affairs with little more than a “That’s great, thanks. I’ll close the job and complete payment”.

    But sometimes a job turns out to be more. Much more.

    I’ve built numerous relationships that started as a single engagement.

    One of the best examples is a couple of e-commerce emails I wrote for an online furniture retailer. It turned into a series of weekly blog posts, and became a complete rewrite of their website. All up, a couple of thousand dollars of work.

    If you’re improving your skills and business processes (points 1 and 2), these relationships develop without any extra work on your part.

    Professionalism isn’t common on freelance writing platforms. It’s a semi-rare, valuable resource. And clients love it.

     

    5. You can earn some extra cash

    I left this one ‘til last, even though it’s usually the first reason people are on places like Upwork.

    This one’s so far down the list because if you’re intent on becoming a copywriter and building your own business, cash at this point is almost secondary.

    Sharpening your skills, improving your processes, knowing how to pitch and building relationships are all more important reasons to be spending time on freelance platforms.

    In light of these, whatever cash you earn is effectively a bonus.

    That said, whatever funds you bring in can be put to good use. If your full-time work is paying the bills, the odd writing job can boost your business with things like:

    • Getting a website built
    • Buying some courses
    • Getting some coaching
    • Grabbing a few tools (e.g. templates. And here’s just the place for that)

    All without having to pay for them out of your own wallet.

     

    But before you dive in…

    Maybe you’re new or somewhat inexperienced in the great game of copywriting.

    And maybe you’re thinking of jumping onto a freelance writing site right now and banging out blogs ‘til the cows come home.

    If that’s the case…

    The biggest trap people fall into on these platforms is thoughtlessly hurling themselves in—signing up in a flash, slapping together a profile, and sending proposal after proposal in scattergun style.

    But you’re going to be different.

    There are dozens of ways to give yourself an edge. Bu let’s zero in on three.

     

    1. Prepare your profile

    Your website (if you have one) is your sales page. Your LinkedIn profile is another.

    And so is your profile page on any freelance writing platform you’re part of.

    It’s something a lot of people don’t realise. They just dash one together and go hunting for work. By simply paying some attention to this, you’ll have an immediate advantage over a lot of your competition before you send out a single proposal.

    Without going into too much detail, Here’s what you can do to stand out:

    • Use a tagline that’s eye catching and specific
    • Choose keywords to attract the types of job you want
    • Structure your overview or description just like you would a sales page (e.g. open in an interesting way, spell out big benefits, use testimonials, end with a call to action)

     

    2. Don’t be afraid to ask for the rate you want

    There’s plenty of ‘race to the bottom’ competition on Upwork.

    You don’t want to be one of them.

    Sure, your first few jobs might not bring in the big bucks. That’s fine. Everyone has to start from somewhere.

    But if you can do a job well, and demonstrate you do it well, set your price and show your value. There are clients who appreciate that on these platforms. And, if you deliver the results they’ll happily pay you for it.

     

    If at first you don’t succeed…

    When you first jump on Upwork and apply for some jobs, you might win some.

    But you might not.

    Freelance writing platforms are as much an exercise in persistence as anything else. You can do all the right things and not get a nibble some days, only to find two or three clients chasing you the next day without having done anything differently.

    If you’re not winning many jobs early on, don’t give in to the temptation to quit. There are two big things you can do to turn the tide:

    1. Keep refining your pitch: Are you writing proposals that would sound interesting or exciting if you were looking to hire?
    2. Look at how you qualify jobs to apply for: Are you grabbing at anything, or only jobs you’re well-suited for? Target jobs that complement your specific skills.

     

    Be there for a reason

    As the poem goes, people come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime.

    Upwork – or any freelancing website – won’t be part of your copywriting life forever. But they do serve a purpose, especially when you’re a fledgling writer uncertain of how to start.

    Use these platforms wisely, and you’ll soon have the skills and experience you need to launch your copywriting business into the world.

     

    Over to you

    Have you ever used a freelancing website? What was your experience with them?

     

    About Dean Mackenzie

    Dean Mackenzie is a Melbourne-based copywriter who specialises in direct response copywriting — that is, copy specifically designed to sell. His work focuses on landing pages, emails and sales pages, along with the odd website and blog. He’s also fond of a good cup of tea.

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    Copy Shop







    Featured member: Bec Djapovic

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Each month we’re singling out one of our members for extra love! The lucky member this month is Bec Djapovic

    In this post Bec will tell us a little about her copywriting journey and the challenges she’s faced so far.
     

    Bec Djapovic | Bio

    Bec Djapovic is a copywriter and voiceover artist who founded Bec Djapovic Communications in 2016.

    Previously a professional dancer/singer/actor, she has worked across many industries from musical theatre, tourism, media, education, and hospitality.

    All this gives her amazing insight into human psychology across diverse industries.

    She has an insatiable appetite for learning and loves helping businesses create communication which compels customers to act.

    Tell us about life before you became a copywriter, what did you do?

    Before becoming a copywriter, I had a fulfilling career travelling the world as a singer on cruise lines and performing in main-stage musical theatre shows.

    While it was an exciting 15-year career, my hips started screaming at me to find a less physically demanding job.

    I tried being (in no particular order) a hypnotist assistant, life coach, 9-5 administrator and an acting teacher, before calling myself a copywriter.

    Once I found copywriting the proverbial ‘shoe’ fit like Cinderellas.

    Why did you decide that copywriting was the right career for you?

    The idea of writing professionally had been floating around my mind for over ten years.

    After a career in entertainment, I decided to build on my ‘real world’ skills and look for a career that would be interesting and offer a tonne of variety.

    I love how copywriting blends my love of business and fascination of psychology into one role.

    It also fulfills my desire to help others succeed in life and business.

    What challenges have you faced since becoming a copywriter?

    My biggest challenge has been keeping boundaries around work and play time.

    Because I work from home, it can be tempting to open the laptop as soon as I wake up and close it late into the night.

    Another big challenge is in letting the work be less than “perfect” (whatever that means…) and trusting that my standard of good enough is comparatively ‘good/great enough.’

    Tell us about your favourite client so far?

    My favourite client has been a company which provides online resources for parents on which educational toys best serve their kids development.

    Their brand tone of voice was similar to my natural writing style so the website content work flowed easily and the client was super satisfied.

    Our relationship was professional and respectful- they were a dream client in all aspects.

    Tell us about your worst client experience so far and the lessons you learned?

    My worst client was my actually my first.

    I jumped into offering my services when I didn’t have ANY systems in place, and the whole experience was a kerfuffle. This mess could have easily thrown me into the ‘this isn’t for me’ shame spiral, but I looked at it as a learning curve and got serious about my processes and systems.

    Oh, and in taking my time to prepare before going to market.

    How has becoming a copywriter changed your day to day life?

    It gives me the freedom and flexibility to work around my family life and gives me a sense of pride at owning a high-quality service based business.

    Plus, it means I can work from home and don’t need to wear a bra – which is always a bonus.

    What one tip would you pass on to someone looking to make the move into copywriting?

    Surround yourself with a community of writers who understand the ebbs and flows of running a service based business.

    Back yourself, be brave, ask questions and learn all you can from mentors. The Clever Copywriting School is a great place to start.

    Over to you

    Have you had any similar experiences to Bec? Please share in the comments below.

     

    Long description :

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    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    Featured member: Kat Rodrigues

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Each month we’re singling out one of our members for extra love! The lucky member this month is Kat Rodrigues

    In this post Kat will tell us a little about her copywriting journey and the challenges she’s faced so far.
     

    Kat Rodrigues | Bio

    Kat Rodrigues is a copywriter and marketing strategist who co-founded boutique marketing agency, Revenge Creative in 2015.

    Previously a professional actor/singer (actually, she still does some of that!) – she worked in everything from musical theatre to real estate, gyms to coffee shops before finally calling herself a copywriter. In her spare time she also writes for her blog, “Sure, Why Not?” and in as an ambassador for One Girl.

    Tell us about life before you became a copywriter, what did you do?

    Too much to actually mention, but the highlights – and lowlights – were professional acting (in musical theatre), real estate sales and marketing, retail, voice over work, some personal training and makeup artistry.

    I can happily say that just about every job I’ve ever had has helped me be a better copywriter (or at least gave me the ability to win some great projects!)

    Why did you decide that copywriting was the right career for you?

    Because for once, it actually fell into place without much forcing.

    I’d always loved writing and between the real estate experience I had and the work I did to produce and market a cabaret show I wrote, I saw that I had a natural flair for marketing.

    Once I realised there was an actual job title that allowed me to combine the two AND quit the brief contract I had at an advertising agency I was in.

    The freedom and flexibility that came with working for myself definitely sealed the deal.

    What challenges have you faced since becoming a copywriter?

    I’ve worked longer and harder than ever before – and I have a lot of trouble switching off.

    I’m addicted to the thrill of chasing jobs but then get resentful and anxious if ever I get a negative email… it’s a vicious cycle!

    I tried to cut back to part time while travelling to Italy for 10 weeks earlier this year and failed miserably. Got freaked out after taking a week off for new year and ended up booking myself out for the rest of the trip.

    I’m still trying to relax and trust that the work (and money) will come, even if I pull back occasionally. I think it’s a classic rookie fear.

    Tell us about your favourite client so far?

    They’re just lovely and totally get me.

    The job started out as a one-off but soon led to ongoing work and they’re now on retainer basically trusting me to “do my thing” and give minimal input because we’re on the same wavelength.

    It helps that I love what they’re selling, so everything I write is authentic – plus they’ve always connected with my natural tone of voice so it’s a good fit all round.

    Tell us about your worst client experience so far and the lessons you learned?

    I’m certain it shaved a few years off my life.

    It was my first big name brand through a reputable agency and it was a nightmare from the first call. I asked them for a brief and they insisted that I didn’t require one and should just start writing based on their existing website copy… except they didn’t like the copy and they didn’t specify what needed changing.

    Long story short, I ended up having to re-write the entire thing (a 30 page website) in the final 3 days before handover. They had to pay another 50% on top of the original fee, so it was the highest paid 3 weeks of my life… but also the most stressful.

    I’m now VERY strict with my briefing process, no matter who I’m talking to!

    How has becoming a copywriter changed your day to day life?

    For one, I’m finally not that person saying “I can’t afford it”!

    Between earning more money than I was used to and being forced to put on my big girl pants and start living on a real life budget (you know, the kind where you live within your means, sans the credit cards?) I’m in the early stages of enjoying financial freedom.

    I also have the flexibility to pursue my acting career again (something I tried unsuccessfully to give up) and since I’m no longer desperate for the work, I’m doing better than ever.

    I also love that my week is so full of variety and getting to speak to some really interesting people…

    I feel like a grown-up except that I think I’m having a lot more fun than most of them!

    What one tip would you pass on to someone looking to make the move into copywriting?

    Don’t wait ’til you feel ready because you never will. Start now.

    HOWEVER – I would seriously recommend checking out the TCCS templates to help your workflow and admin, plus joining the group so you’re surrounded by supportive peeps who don’t believe in stupid questions (well, we do – but we all ask them, so it’s okay!)

    Aside from my own blood, sweat and tears, I credit the rest of my success to the amazing community Kate Toon set up. It has changed my life and career for good!

    Over to you

    Have you had any similar experiences to Kat? Please share in the comments below.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    Copywriting Gurus: Meet Kate Toon

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Kate Toon is an experienced copywriter, owner of The Clever Copywriting School and was a keynote speaker at CopyCon 2017.

    In this post Kate will tell us a little about her copywriting journey and the gems she has learnt along the way.
     

    How long have you been a copywriter?

    I’ve been writing since I was a small human, but I don’t think I officially allowed myself to call myself a copywriter until I hit 28, when I started working as a copywriter at Ogilvy.

     

    Tell us how you became a copywriter:

    I wanted to write for Smash Hits, but left Uni with a big debt and instead of taking up my prestigious place at Journalism School, I got a job at the NHS typing memos.

    I spent years in the job wilderness of events, publishing, digital media, advertising and even massage and gibbon keeping before I was brave enough to take a big pay cut and work as a copywriter at the then Singleton Ogilvy and Mather in Sydney. I worked in various agencies in the UK on big brand clients. Came back to Australia and then fannied about for several years before going freelance in 2006, four months before producing a human. 

     

    What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced?

    My own insecurities. I spent a long time thinking I wasn’t a good enough writer and I knew full well I was terrible at grammar and spelling.

    This held me back from fully embracing my copywriter title for a while. And even now I still get pangs.

     

    What achievement are you most proud of?

    I struggled with this one.

    Personally my family – I know that’s not an achievement but still.

    Business wise, I guess writing a business ebook, or my ecourse, or the CopyCon event. But in reality, it’s probably my Tooncave writing hut, that felt like a huge thing, and I still love it each and every day. 

     

    What advice do you have for newbie copywriters?

    First accept there is room for you and there is work for you. It feels like a crowded market but there is a lot of work going around, and a lot of businesses who don’t even know they need a copywriter yet – you can persuade them.

    But the other piece of advice is: work bloody hard. The copywriters who succeed, don’t waste half the day on Instagram, or having coffee with friends. They get their bum in the seat and they work hard. And when they don’t have clients, they work on their own marketing.

    You’ve got to push yourself a little if you want to get anywhere.

     

    What advice do you have for worn out old copywriters! 

    Change it up. Make a new thing, try a new niche, sack a client. I think it’s always good to have a back burner personal business project on the go, something to work towards.

     

    What’s your writing quirk? 

    I physically cannot write with my hands any more. I can only type. And thankfully I can type as fast as I think. Almost. 

     

    What are you fave writing apps?

    Erm… Just MsWord and the Hemmingway.app – maybe thesaurus.com.

     

    What do you do when you hit a writing block?

    I just start formatting stuff.

    If I have a job to start I’ll begin by adding in all the client details and adding really rough notes to each page.

    Then I’ll take a walk. Then I come back to a page that isn’t blank.

     

    What is your favourite thing to write about?

    Myself. Wow how self-indulgent does that sound. But I love using anecdotes and personal stories in my writing.

     

    Over to you

    Have you had any similar experiences to Kate? Please share in the comments below.

    Long description :

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    Copywriting Gurus: Meet Kelly Exeter

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Kelly Exeter is an experienced copywriter and was a keynote speaker at CopyCon 2017.

    In this post Kelly will tell us a little about her copywriting journey and the gems she has learnt along the way.
     

    How long have you been a copywriter?

    Hmm, for as long as I can remember. I’ve been writing stories and ‘books’ since I was in primary school.

     

    Tell us how you became a copywriter:

    I was an avid reader from an early age and just loved writing my own stories too. A common theme since an early age is that I’ve always had ideas I’ve wanted to express.

    Writing has always been the medium through which I could most effectively express those ideas.

     

    What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced?

    Finding the time to do all the things necessary to build a profile and get noticed (by the right kind of reader) as a writer and author.

    For example, it’s all well and good to write a book (or three), but if you don’t have the time to properly launch and promote the book, it will struggle to make an impact. And that’s been my situation to date.

    It’s great that I’ve found the time to write and publish three books – but I’ve not had the ability to promote any of them properly – and that’s a challenge I’ve yet to overcome.

     

    What achievement are you most proud of?

    Becoming Editor of FlyingSolo.com.au.

    It was a big deal for me to get that role, and I just love being able to drive the conversation for solo operators and small businesses in Australia.

    If you don’t mind me naming two achievements instead of one, I was also pretty stoked when two of my articles were named in Copyblogger’s ‘Best of 2016’ last year.

     

    What advice do you have for newbie copywriters?

    The sooner you embrace your own voice, the better.

    Every copywriter I’ve ever hired, was hired based on their voice. It doesn’t need to be as distinct as, say, a Kate Toon’s. It just needs to be theirs.

    The quality of someone’s writing always goes through the roof when they start writing like themselves instead of trying to sound like someone else. (Don’t worry; we’ve all done it. For years I tried to write like both Mia Freedman and Sarah Wilson.)

     

    What advice do you have for worn out old copywriters! 

    Challenge yourself to write outside your niche, or for a different publication, or even in a different form (enter a short story competition for example). Allow yourself to write things that will never be used (like Morning Pages). The latter always breaks me out of a funk.

     

    What’s your writing quirk? 

    I love ellipses and em dashes.

    I am completely addicted to them. Oh, and exclamation marks. If there was an easy way to type interrobangs, I’d be addicted to those too.

     

    What are you fave writing apps?

    Word and Evernote. I know, so boring!

     

    What do you do when you hit a writing block?

    This only happens when I don’t have enough mental whitespace in my life. (Like when I’m overwhelmed and being pulled in 30 different directions.)

    My quickest cure is to go for a walk. And then get busy dealing with the source of the overwhelm.

     

    What is your favourite thing to write about?

     

    Over to you

    Have you had any similar experiences to Kelly? Please share in the comments below.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    Copywriting Gurus: Meet Glenn Murray

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Glenn Murray is an experienced copywriter and was a keynote speaker at CopyCon 2017.

    In this post Glenn will tell us a little about his copywriting journey and the gems he has learnt along the way.
     

    How long have you been a copywriter?

    Since 1994 – so 23 years.

     

    Tell us how you became a copywriter:

    I was finishing up a Bachelor of Arts with a double major in English Literature and Linguistics, and still had no idea what I wanted to do when I grew up.

    A friend doing the same degree came to uni one day and told me she’d gotten a job as a technical writer for a software company. I’d never heard of that, so I asked what it was, and when she told me, I said, “I could do that!”

    That night I wrote to a few Sydney software companies, offering my soul for a few pennies, and one of them happened to need someone. They took me on as a casual, paying me $10/hr. I could have been earning more back at the Woolworths deli, but at least this way I didn’t come home smelling like cabanossi!

     

    What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced?

    The biggest challenges are always financial.

    Sure there are times when you’re so busy you can hardly breathe, but it’s always worse when you’re deathly quiet.

    The prospect of going broke and being forced to go get a job is terrifying. Constantly dealing with that terror is the biggest challenge.

    But outside of that, I’d say working through the busy times, no matter what’s going on in your world. Like when my wife had our first baby: I worked through the early part of her labour, and also when she brought our son home. Her mum came and stayed with us for a week, because I had a big job on which, according to the client, “just couldn’t wait”.

    Of course, they didn’t review it for four months after I delivered it, but that’s a whole ‘nother story! :-(

     

    What achievement are you most proud of?

    Keeping my family afloat, financially, for all these years. Building Divine Write up from nothing to next to nothing. Overcoming the challenges above.

    Always delivering my best.

     

    What advice do you have for newbie copywriters?

    Know you can do it.

    Let the words come out; don’t force them- unless you have to. Yeah, sometimes you have to, but if they’re coming out freely, let them.

    Don’t be hampered by all the rules and best practices. Learn them, but also learn when breaking them is the best possible thing you can do.

     

    What advice do you have for worn out old copywriters! 

    Do something different.

    Switch up your pricing model, or the way you deal with clients. Offer a different service or deliver your copy using a different technology (a wireframe or Google Docs instead of Word).

    Question everything, especially your attitude.

     

    What’s your writing quirk? 

    I don’t know that I have a writing quirk. Well, not one that pertains to the writing exactly.

    I have one that pertains to the thinking though. I spin a texta (or pen or whatever’s handy) around my thumb – compulsively. Hundreds, if not thousands of times per day. Have been doing it since high school.

     

    What are you fave writing apps?

    Google Docs. Balsamiq.

     

    What do you do when you hit a writing block?

    Stop. Come back to it the next day. It takes a lot of discipline to do, but if the words aren’t coming out, forcing them generally won’t give you the results you want. Of course, there are times when you have no choice but to soldier on, and at times like that you have to have confidence that the words coming out will still be pretty good. If you don’t have the confidence, they’ll be shit.

     

    What is your favourite thing to write about?

    Politics and social issues.

     

    Tell us a funny story….

    I once told my boss he had flowers or pollen on his shoulders. Must have walked under a tree. He just looked at me weirdly and walked away. The next day it was back.

    Turns out he had really bad dandruff.

    Mouth, meet foot.

     

    Over to you

    Have you had any similar experiences to Glenn? Please share in the comments below.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop