10 terrifying (but terrific) ways to market your copywriting business

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    How to win more clients in a competitive industry

     

    This post was written by TCCS member, Leanne Shelton

     

    Not everyone can write well. But these days, more and more business owners – large and small – recognise the importance of high-quality written communications.

    Whether it’s influential conversion copy, engaging websites, heartwarming scripts or captivating blogs, they need us to help them market their business.

    Yes, our copywriting skills and expertise are in high demand. But that doesn’t always translate to an inbox or voicemail full of enquiries.

    Because before we can help other businesses, we need to market our own.

    And that’s easier said than done.

    Especially when there are so many other talented copywriters out there.

    However, in my experience it all comes down to building connections.

    After all, you are your business.

    But I promise the effort will really pay off.

    To help you out, I want to share my 10 terrifying (but terrific) ways to market your copywriting business.

     

    1. In-person networking

    Networking.

    <SHUDDER>

    I’ve freaked you out already, haven’t I?

    But honestly, in-person networking has been one of the most effective marketing strategies for my business.

    By putting yourself out there and meeting new people, you’ll find endless opportunities to find collaboration partners, referrals, and clients.

     

    Tips

    I recommend looking into the various networking groups in your neighbourhood, such as:

    They all have different styles and structures, so visit a few (or ask others for feedback) and see which ones suit you best.

    • If you receive a list of attendees before the event, make a note of the people in your target market or niche. When you arrive, ask the event host (or someone who appears to know a lot of people) to introduce you.
    • Start a casual conversation by asking the other person about their recent wins or current challenges, or compliment them on what they’re wearing. (Everybody loves that.)

    Remember: Networking is NOT about the hard sell and throwing your business cards around. Don’t aim to score work from the event. Aim to make new connections instead. You never know where they will lead.

     

    2. Facebook Lives

    Ah yes, those scary Facebook Lives.

    What if I forget what to say?
    What if I look like a complete idiot?
    What if I have broccoli wedged in my teeth?

    Well, here’s the good news: if you stuff it up, you don’t have to save it.

    Editor’s note: Keep in mind that when you first start no one but your friends and family will be watching anyway. I’m not sure if that makes it more or less scary.

    Facebook Lives are great for building relationships with your audience.

    It’s your opportunity to show the real person behind the brand. And the less scripted it is, the better.

    After all, real-life conversations aren’t usually rehearsed.

     

    Tips

    Step 1 – Choose a topic that shows your expertise or highlights your opinion.
    Step 2 – Think of a few points to cover, but don’t overthink it.
    Step 3 – Decide on an attention-grabbing line that describes your topic
    Step 4 – Take a deep breath and go ‘Live’.

    You could go live on:

    • Your own business Facebook page
    • Within a Facebook group (with permission from the admin, of course)
    • Your <eek> general newsfeed

    Remember to keep it short and friendly. Going live will both build your personal brand and attract kudos from those too scared to do it themselves.

     

    3. LinkedIn videos

    If you’re not on LinkedIn, now’s the time to get on board. It’s not just a hub for job seekers anymore.

    Yes, I’m talking about videos again.

    But uploading a pre-recorded video to a platform where powerful and influential business people hang out can be even more excruciatingly biting-your-nails-off terrifying than Facebook Lives.

    Because unlike Facebook, your LinkedIn videos won’t be seen by just friends and family.

    They could also be seen by real-life money-paying potential clients.

    Which is precisely why you should do it.

     

    Tips

    While I suggest having a clear message in mind to avoid babbling, you still need to show the real you. Here are some great LinkedIn video tips from HubSpot.

     

    4. Cold pitching by phone

    Before email and SMS, business owners had to reach out to potential clients by – wait for it – calling them.

    Oh, the horror.

    These days, most of us feel snug and secure thanks to the email safety net. But if you want to make yourself stand out, pitching to clients by picking up the phone is the best way. It shows confidence in your abilities and is fantastic for building rapport.

     

    Tips

    • Check out their website and get an idea of what their business offers.
    • Don’t try to predict how the conversation will go. Just call and say you’re enquiring about the job posted on the TCCS job board or job request in the Facebook group and go from there.
    • Find opportunities to connect with the potential client, such as highlighting something you saw on their website or asking about their weekend.

    On multiple occasions, the person on the other end of the line has been surprised and impressed when I’ve called, and I’ve instantly won the job.

     

    5. Cold pitching by email

    Even if you choose to email, cold pitching in writing can still create a whole lotta pressure. After all, you’re a copywriter. So any spelling or grammatical mistakes won’t exactly leave a great impression.

    Ultimately, it’s a great opportunity to sell yourself in a non-salesy way.

     

    Tips

    • Remember to pitch according to the job request, but also add some personality.
    • Use conversational language.
    • Consider what experience and skills you bring to the table. Highlight why they simply must choose you for the task.

    Oh, and if you’re often victimised by autocorrect or spelling mishaps, it’s best to use a tool such as GradeProof or Grammarly before pressing ‘send’.

     

    6. Showing your face

    Selfies are no longer limited to obnoxious teenagers. These days, selfies can actually be beneficial to your business.

    Similar to videos, showing a selfie is your opportunity to display the face that’s usually trapped behind a computer screen. It also means giving your audience a snapshot into your world.

     

    Tips

    • Attending a conference? Take a photo in front of the massive signage as proof.
    • Having coffee with your favourite client? Just met an influential leader? Get a photo together and show how well connected you are.
    • Add some words around the scenario and ask a question to create engagement. And selfies usually attract very high engagement.

     

    7. Being a guest on a podcast

    Appearing as a guest on a podcast or local radio station allows you to present yourself as an industry expert. But it’s bloody scary.

    What if you don’t know the answer to a question?
    What if you start babbling?
    What if you feel like an absolute knob-head at the end of the interview?

     

    Tips

    • While it can be extremely nerve-wracking, the host will be eager to make you relaxed to produce the best possible interview for their show. So just follow their lead and be yourself. You’ve got this.
    • Share the podcast link across all your social channels and website once it goes live. You gotta make sure people hear it.

     

    8. Showing your true personality

    People buy from people they like and trust.

    But the reality is that not all business owners or marketing managers will connect with every copywriter. We’ve all got our quirks and skills that will appeal to some but repel others.

    The key is to be yourself so you attract the right people.

     

    Tips

    • Be consistent in your personal brand. (For example, I always wear something turquoise when I’m in a business setting.)
    • Use your normal conversational language when writing an email.
    • Don’t be afraid to express your true feelings in a Facebook Live or LinkedIn video.
    • Don’t switch to corporate speak or jargon when you pick up the phone.

    The right people will be eager to work with you

     

    9. Checking in with old clients

    Have you had a great working experience with a client but haven’t heard from them in months, or even years? It doesn’t need to be the end.

    While it’s good to keep in contact via a newsletter, sending a personalised email or making a friendly call to an old client to check in may be very well received.

    You might feel salesy and annoying. But they’ll probably see you as someone who actually cares about their business, rather than being just a one-night-stand.

     

    Tips

    • Casually start the conversation by asking how their business is going.
    • If you wrote their website copy, blogs, or landing page, you could ask about the views and click-throughs they’re getting.

    You never know. They might have a series of copywriting tasks on their to-do list and been meaning to get in touch. Or they may have ended up hiring an internal communications expert. But you’ll never know unless you ask, right?

     

    10. Speaking up (TOON TIP)

    Now that you’ve done all those Facebook Lives, Podcasts, and LinkedIn videos, you should feel more confident about your subject matter.

    It’s time to take it on the road, people.

    It’s time to clamber onto the stage, clutch that microphone with sweaty paws, and SPEAK.

    People often ask me how I get speaking gigs.

    The answer? I apply.

    You’d be surprised how few (decent) applications events get. You could be one of the lucky few. It’s an amazing way to build your expertise, authority and trust. And you get to connect with humans in a real and genuine way.

     

    Tips

    • Review previous speakers to ensure you’re pitching new content ideas.
    • Look through Facebook groups to ensure you’re picking a hot and relevant topic.
    • Prepare well. Rehearse your speech a few dozen times before you go on stage.
    • Keep it simple. Don’t fill your slides with thousands of bullet points.
    • Include a CTA. Give the audience a way to follow up with you.
    • Brand it, baby. Ensure your presentation branding is strong and encourages watchers to take photos and share on social media.

     

    Conclusion

    Yes, some of these marketing tips are super scary. But you don’t have to do them all at once. I suggest picking a couple and seeing how you go. Trust me, it will be worth the effort.

     

    Here’s a summary of the tips

    • Try a few networking groups to see which ones suit you best. Start a casual conversation by asking the other person about their recent wins or current challenges, or compliment them on what they’re wearing.
    • When doing a Facebook Live, remember to keep it short and friendly.
    • When doing a LinkedIn video, have a clear message in mind to avoid babbling. But still show the real you.
    • If you’re doing a cold call, find opportunities to connect with the potential client such as highlighting something you saw on their website or asking about their weekend.
    • For cold emails, consider what experience and skills you bring to the table. Highlight why they simply must choose you for the task.
    • Attending a conference? Take a selfie in front of the massive signage as proof.
    • If you’re a guest on radio or a podcast, follow the host’s lead and be yourself.
    • Be consistent in your personal brand.
    • When checking in with old clients, show an interest in their business by asking how it’s tracking.
    • When pitching to present at an event, look through Facebook groups to ensure you’re picking a hot and relevant topic.

     

    Over to you

    Feeling inspired to take action? I hope so. If you have any wins from trying any of these 10 tips, please share them below.

     

    About Leanne Shelton

    Leanne is a freelance copywriter and content marketing trainer in Sydney. As a mum of two young girls, she enjoys attending evening networking events to escape the bedtime routine and listening to inspiring podcasts. Otherwise, you’ll find her curled up on the couch with a tea and gluten- and dairy-free chocolate biscuit.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    What to do when copywriting work goes quiet.

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Kate Merryweather

     

    Quiet times happen to us all. As a copywriter with seven years of experience, I recently found myself in a quiet stage. What did I do? Got busy.

    Here’s 19 productive steps you can take to get ahead, improve your processes and find new clients when copywriting work goes quiet.

    From upping your network game to preparing content in advance to stalking leads on LinkedIn, there’s plenty of work to be done that will pay off down the line. Your future self will thank you.

     

    1. Panic. Seriously, if work is getting quiet, now is a perfectly good time to panic.

    It’s your livelihood. When you have bills and mortgages to pay, it can be incredibly stressful to lose income. So, don’t listen to anyone who says not to panic. That’s nuts. Panic as much as you want. Then move on to the rest of the items on this list.

     

     

    2. Watch the TCCS (and other) job boards like a mofo.

    Don’t email responses. Give the leads a call. First in gets the curly fries.

     

    3. Audit your website.

    Freshen up outdated pages, optimise your images, ensure it’s responsive and mobile friendly. Does your website looks like it belongs in 2019 or 2012? For the love of pancakes, get rid of any sliders on your website. Plus, banish any images of fingers tapping on keyboards. (Could it *be* any more cliché?)

     

     

    4. Gather case studies.

    Publish them on your website so your portfolio is looking smick.

     

    5. Consider your niche.

    By specialising in an area, you can establish a reputation for being the go-to expert copywriter in real estate, finance, beauty or lifestyle brands.

     

    6. Brush up on your LinkedIn game.

    Request connections from potential clients in your niche, and post content on how you can solve their problems. Refine your bio, ask for referrals and leave thoughtful comments (Gary Vee says 90 comments per day but he’s nuts.) Publish interesting posts, showing off your pithy writing skills in the process. Instead of posting links to your blog, write native LinkedIn articles and watch your visibility soar. Do Kate’s LinkedIn course.

     

    7. Take a deep dive into your SEO and find out which pages are ranking best.

    Do one of The Recipe for SEO Success courses to jump a few notches on the Google search rankings.

     

    8. Sort out your Google My Business page.

    Write posts, add images and invite customers to give you reviews. I find humorous I’m-not-begging-but-I-am-begging requests work.

     

    9. Write blogs in advance.

    When you’re busy down the track, you’ll have pre-written blog posts prepared and ready to publish.

     

     

    10. Unless you are starving, don’t reduce your prices to be more competitive.

    On the contrary. Review your prices by doing the Toon pricing course.

     

    11. Update your timesheeting process.

    Watching the clock is the only way to see exactly how long jobs take you and which are most profitable.

     

    12. Guest blog. Pitch guest articles for high domain authority websites.

    You will raise your profile and you may get a juicy backlink which helps your SEO.

     

    13. Increase your network.

    Your clients may need suppliers like developers, photographers, videographers, graphic designers and social media managers. You can helpfully refer your clients to your network of experts (and they can refer to you too = $ker-ching$).

     

    14. Review your workflow.

    How can you automate oft-repeated processes? Write a sequence of emails as templates for each step in your copywriting process. Check out workflow and project management tools like Asana, Basecamp or Dubsado so your client experience is ultra profesh.

     

    15. Polish up your proposals.

    Ditch your dorky Microsoft Word proposal and create something snazzy on Canva

     

     

    16. Network.

    Kick off your moccasins, pluck your monobrow and enter the world of face-to-face networking. Wear your TCCS ‘copy beast’ badge as a conversation starter.

     

    17. Tell people you are available.

    A regular client of mine was surprised when I told her things were quiet. She hadn’t been giving me briefs because she thought I was busy. So, when copywriting work goes quiet, get in touch with previous clients and let them know you’re available.

     

    18. Subcontract to other TCCS members.

    There are plenty of opportunities for subcontracting to senior copywriters. Put your hand up.

     

    19. Update your email signature.

    You can do cool things like beg for ask for reviews, share your availability over coming weeks or link to your newsletter.

     

    Guess what?

    I’ve been following the items on this list and I’ve booked in two juicy projects. So it works.

     

    But also?

    My slump coincided with school holidays, so I’ve been playing Footy Feud, learning to floss, watching Disney movies and making apple cakes in my Thermomix. So it’s cool to take a break from freelancing. My list is here when you need it.

     

     

    About Kate Merryweather

    Kate is a freelance copywriter and mum of three who annoys people by talking about her Thermomix. She specialises in copywriting for digital marketing agencies and likes borrowing books from the library she will never read.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    The discombobulating reality of being a freelance copywriter

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Andrew Lau

     

    Over the years, a lot of people have told me they want to become freelance copywriters like me. They want to free themselves from the 9 am to 9 pm rat-race. They want time flexibility. And they want the freedom to pick and choose clients they really want to work with.

    And yes, this dream is achievable.

    You can do all these things as a freelance copywriter. You can say goodbye to horrible 12-hour days in a corporate cage because you’re the boss. And if you just happen to hate the colour of a potential client’s tie, you have zero obligation to service them.

    But here’s the discombobulating reality that most copywriters don’t talk about:

     

    You’re a business person first, and a copywriter last

    You probably think that sounds bonkers, or even stupid. After all, a copywriter’s job is to write copy, isn’t it? Isn’t their role to generate words that persuade everyday punters to spend their hard-earned cash on services and products?

    Isn’t the job about being creative with language?

    Nope. At least not yet. Let me explain.

     

    Before you write a single word…

    — you’re a marketer, a salesperson.

    You see, you’ve gotta get out there, let the world know who you are, what you can do, and the value you add to a client’s business. Otherwise, you’ll never write a word of copy.

    To be more accurate, you’ll never be paid for a single word of copy you write. Let’s face it: you’re not interested in writing copy just because you love words. Survival is the driving force here.

    You’re trying to make some bacon.

    A lot of people want to become writers so they can escape the icky grossness of business-wank chatter. But the reality is, nobody’s handing out copywriting coupons. Especially not to Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss Hidey-Hole.

    Copywriting is a business, and in business you have to sell yourself. You need to draw some attention to yourself. You need to show clients you’re so creative with words that you’re worth hiring for money you can actually live on.

    Again, it’s about makin’ bacon. Which means it’s business!

     

    So you’ve sold yourself and won a project

    Good on you! But you’re still not a copywriter. In fact, you’re not even in the vicinity of being a copywriter.

    You’re now an accountant, business manager, information interrogator, researcher and notetaker — all at the same time. But you still don’t get to be a copywriter yet.

    How’s this possible?

    Let’s say a client has nominated you, the ‘chosen one’, to write their next 5,000 Twitter posts.

    It’s time to put your accounting hat on. Punch in those numbers and make that invoice. You have to charge your client a deposit (or ‘commencement fee’) of some kind. It’s madness to start work if they haven’t made a monetary commitment.

    Think about it. What if you start writing and the client cancels the project? That’s time down the toilet. And time equals money.

    Put your business manager hat on and get them to sign the damned, dotted line of that contract. Protect yourself legally from getting bent over backwards and snapped in half. Remember, A – B – C. Always. Be. Closing.

    Only closers get coffee around here.

    Can you be a copywriter yet? Nope. Now you’ve got a pile of client meetings to attend, a ton of notes to make, and even more research to do.

    You need to ask the questions that must be asked. What are the services and/or products that must be sold? What tone of voice is needed? What’s the core of your message? Who are your competitors? Have you got any business intelligence and statistics that can be used?

    What do you, my beautiful behemoth client, really want to say and achieve?

    If you’ve elicited all this info, you’re getting closer to writing the copy.

     

    Can I write the damned copy yet?

    No, you cannot write the copy. Not just yet. You still need to do a few things before you type that first word or put pen to paper.

    You need to be smart.

    Start by controlling expectations and mitigating risk around delivery of deliverables (try saying that five times fast). You need to manage your time, because who knows? You may have won a few other projects in the meantime. And you can’t do all the things at once.

    So put your project manager hat on. Get your calendar out and mark down when your Twitter campaign of 5,000 posts begins and ends, as well as where your other projects will fit into the grand scheme of your beautiful freelance copywriter life.

    When does the client need their work delivered? Does it need to go through their legal team? How long will the approval process take? If the workload is too big, can the delivery be made in phases over an extended period of time?

    Get the answers. You got ‘em? Good.

     

    Writing the copy (finally)

    Okay, now you can get creative with those ideas and words.

    But can you see how much you need to do before you get to the work implied by the glorious title of ‘copywriter’?

    Having time flexibility and being able to cherry pick your clients is awesome.

    But make no mistake. If you think a freelance copywriter just sits on white sandy beaches with crystal blue water lapping at their feet while smashing out words on their shiny, golden MacBook Air (oof, take a deep breath), read this blog post again.

    Whether you’ve been a copywriter for 30 days or 30 years, the same rules apply as when you jumped into the freelance game for the first time.

    You’re no longer surrounded by a cushy corporate infrastructure made up of accountants, business managers, researchers, statisticians, project managers and other creatives.

    You’re on your own. And as a freelancer, all that responsibility is now on you. That is, at least until you make your first zillion bucks and can afford to hire copy minions to do your bidding.

    Discombobulated yet? Great. Now go make some bacon.

    Editors note: Veggie bacon!

    PS — It’s okay to be discombobulated. Now say ‘discombobulated’ ten times really fast.

     

    BIO: About Andrew Lau

    Andrew Lau is a copywriter, partly obsessed with deep fried chicken drumsticks but wholly obsessed with the movies. What a nerd.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    10 reasons why you MUST head to CopyCon19

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    If you think copywriting conferences are only for grammar geeks waving red pens, it’s time to change the colour of your ink.

    Here are ten reasons why attending CopyCon19 is a no-brainer if you’re a content creator.

    As Australia’s only dedicated conference for copywriters and content creators, CopyCon is now in its third year.

    In 2019, the event has moved to Melbourne and is being held at the wonderful Arts Centre from May 4–5.

    Tickets are selling fast as the well-penned word travels quickly on what great value the weekend is for anyone who writes for a living.

    The brainchild of Australia’s SEO expert and copywriter Kate Toon, CopyCon was established to give a dedicated online community the chance to meet in person and gain invaluable knowledge from expert speakers.

    In doing so, it has become a conference for anyone looking to grow their copywriting business, learn about content creation, or connect with other creatives in a collaborative space.

    If you’ve been wondering whether CopyCon19 is the conference for you, here are ten reasons why the date should already be in your calendar and the tickets in your inbox.

     

    1. A conference that’s not just for copywriters

    Okay, let’s get this out of the way first up.

    Yes, it’s called CopyCon. And yes, it’s a conference for copywriters. But it’s not only for copywriters. CopyCon has been created for anyone who needs to write well in their business or work.

    In an age where great content is vital yet so hard to find, you’ll learn the tips and tricks that will make your words heard among the noise.

    If you’re a social media manager, marketing manager, inhouse or freelance content creative who needs to connect with an audience (and what business doesn’t?) then it’s time to become a part of a community that can take your engagement to the next level.


    “It’s about finding your tribe. It’s about going with half an idea or no idea and coming out with a better idea.” — Steve May, Rockatansky


     

    2. Speakers who deliver relevant information, not a sales pitch

    There’s nothing worse than spending a day listening to speakers who are so disconnected from your reality you feel they must come from another dimension.

    They’ve become so successful on the speaking circuit, they’ve forgotten the day-to-day struggles to fit everything in.

    You don’t want to hustle, hustle, hustle, and you certainly need more than four hours’ sleep to function.

    You want more than five minutes talking to the topic before an unsubtle segue has them recapping their well-told story or pitching their latest offer.

    At CopyCon, each speaker is chosen because they bring honest value to the stage.

    When you have a group such as The Clever Copywriting School, you can go directly to the members and ask them which guest speakers they want to hear, what topics they want to learn, and what help they need to grow their business.

    As a conference participant, what you get in return is speakers who tailor their content to answer relevant questions.

    This year’s line-up includes:

    • Kate Toon: Suriving the client dating game
      Ryan Wallman: Making taglines work
    • Rob Marsh: Writing the perfect sales page
    • Bernadette Schwerdt: The 7 secrets to writing copy that gets results every time
    • Suzanne Chadwick:Building an unbeatable brand for you and your clients
    • Aaron Agius:The secrets to advanced content marketing and SEO

    Here’s the full speaker line-up and schedule.

     

    3. Practical advice and easy-to-implement actions

    How many times have you attended a conference and left full of enthusiasm to make changes for personal or professional growth, only to be completely overwhelmed by everything you need to do when you sit down at your desk and don’t have the hype of the presenter in your head?

    It happens. A lot.

    When you leave CopyCon you’ll undoubtedly want to make changes to your business.

    But unlike other conferences, there’s no smorgasbord of expensive options you need to commit to with discounts if you sign up in the next 27 minutes.

    CopyCon gives you delicious bite-sized morsels of goodness you can act immediately. The take-aways are manageable, with enough leftovers for another day.

    They’ll give you a return on your investment – whether that be your time or your money –but without that awful feeling of biting off more than you can chew.


    “I walked away with half a dozen insights that I put into action in my business. Those actions helped me streamline my processes and feel more confident and in control as a small business owner.” Anna RoganCopywriter


     

    4. Keep yourself accountable with video access

    You’re listening intently, completely focussed on what everyone has to say.

    You’re entirely present and not bothering to take notes.

    Why? Because you know CopyCon has your back. You know the entire day – speakers and panel discussions – is being recorded.

    You know you can go back and listen to the recordings, take note of the key points and upload them directly into Trello or Asana for quick action.

    And it’s all included in the price of your ticket.

     

    5. Connect with the best copywriters in Australia

    When you attend Australia’s only dedicated conference for copywriters, you’ll find the best Australia has to offer.

    Not only do you get to hear from them on stage, but you get to talk with them during the day, at lunch, and even in the coffee queue.

    If you’re a web developer, graphic designer or marketing manager, this is your chance to be a kid in a candy store.

    You get to meet the people you’ve been talking to in Facebook groups and forums.

    You get to make real connection out of a virtual one.

    You can ask the questions you’ve been afraid to ask but in a face-to-face conversation. And the good news? Copywriters by nature are people pleasers.

    They’re only too happy to answer your questions and talk your ear off about the things they know and love — SEO, keywords, site audits, tone of voice, USPs and ideal target markets, just to name a few.

     

    6. All right stop! Collaborate and listen.

    So, there are more than 100 copywriters and content creators in the same room.

    They’re all giving each other side eyes and clutching their notes close to their chests.

    The breaks in the day are quiet affairs, with no-one really talking about what’s happening in their business.

    It’s a room full of people competing for the same jobs, the same work. It’s a dog-eat-dog world, right?

    WRONG.

    CopyCon is a room of more than 100 copywriters and content creators encouraging each other to succeed.

    They view each other not as competition, but as co-workers and colleagues.

    They may not work in the same office, but they hang in the same space, and the online friendships transfer to the real world.

    It’s where you get to take time out of your busy schedule to talk about future projects, sub-contracting opportunities, and joint venture partnerships.

    It’s where a finance writer speaks with a beauty writer and sets up a referral network. It’s where collaboration is key, and magic happens.

     

    7. Networking for people, not pitches

    Conferences and networking. Two words that strike fear in the heart of any introverted writer.

    It conjures up images of standing in a room full of strangers, desperately thinking of things to say to fill the deafening silence. Or trying to escape the seen-it-all, done-it-all, know-it-all who insists you must buy their latest e-book/course/webinar/product/service.

    Not at CopyCon.

    This is the conference where you have like-minded people coming together to meet, talk, chat and listen.

    There are introverts and extroverts, omniverts and ambiverts. Everyone’s there to have a good time and get to know the person, not make a hard sell. Because we all know you have to know, like and trust someone before you sell to them, right? That’s just Networking 101.

    Here’s what attendees from last year’s conference had to say:

    “It’s a douchebag-free zone – no sales chats, no upselling, onselling, just clever creatives coming together to do clever creative things.”
    Emma Gilmour – Emma Writes Copy

     

    “The only conference you need to attend all year. Practical, generous advice without the fluff or hard sell.”
    Beck Cofrancesco – Marketing Goodness

     

    “Your brain will be buzzing with the new ideas and the audience is one of the friendliest bunches you’ll meet.” Rashida Tayabali – Copywriter

    By the time the networking event rolls around on the Saturday evening, you’ll have made firm friends you’ll want to have a few bevvies and a bite to eat with.

     

    8. Hear from business owners at different stages of their career

    Let’s face it: we’re not unique snowflakes.

    No matter where you are in your copywriting career, there’s always somebody ahead of you on the leaderboard, and somebody behind you learning the rules of engagement.

    It’s great to look forward to what you can achieve while looking back at how far you’ve come.

    One of the keys to CopyCon’s success is the presenters aren’t overnight successes who made their millions living the laptop lifestyle.

    They’ve worked hard for their reputations – they’re leaders in their field who are known for their willingness to share their knowledge, their successes and the occasional failure.

    The schedule also contains ten-minute slots that showcase copywriters at different stages of their business building, talking about the lessons they’ve learned so far. Some are starting out, and some are seasoned veterans with wise tales to tell.

    Either way, the speakers give an honest insight into what it takes to run a copywriting business in 2019.

     

    9. Family-friendly for new mums and dads

    We all know that when you’re in business, personal and professional development is essential to your success.

    You need to continue upskilling yourself and keep in the know with the latest the industry has to offer.

    Having a small human who is dependent on you for their very survival shouldn’t stop you from gaining knowledge. After all, it’s 2019.

    It’s also why CopyCon welcomes new parents with babes-in-arms.

    You’ll be comfortable knowing your little offsider is a welcome member of the CopyCon team.

    Facilities are provided for feeding and changing (no hiding in the bathroom), and there’s a good chance your little one will get a head start in their own personal branding.

     

    10. And then there’s the icing on the CopyCon cookie

    Yep, there are cookies. And there are massages. And delicious food.

    There’s the community, comradery and possibly karaoke.

    In a beautiful venue close to all Melbourne has to offer, it’s a weekend away to immerse yourself in words and wisdom.

    CopyCon isn’t like other conferences. It’s been designed that way.

    Until you’ve experienced it, you can’t really describe the feeling of welcoming and warmth it offers.

    But once you’ve been, you’ll know you’ve attended something very special.

     

    So, there you have it – ten reasons to attend CopyCon19

    It probably sounds too good be true.

    But believe me, it’s not.

    If you’re still sitting on the fence, undecided about whether you should attend, you can always watch the video reviews from CopyCon18.

    But don’t wait too long. Numbers are limited. Tickets are selling fast. And we don’t sell false scarcity.

    It really is the conference for copywriters that delivers quality content.
    Make sure you’re a part of it.

     

    Did we nail it?

    We’d love to hear your experience if you’ve attended CopyCon previously.

    Thinking of attending, or know somebody who should? Feel free to share away.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    5 ways a copywriter community can improve your copywriting business

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Rose Crompton

     

    How to get the most out of your first week as a member of The Clever Copywriting School

    Wondering if you’ve made a good decision for your copywriting business can be exhausting at the best of times. But when you’re new and trying to grow, it can easily spiral into a thought pattern of Should I really do this?, Will it be useful to my business? and How do I make the most of it?

    Having all that whizzing round your head is distracting. But it’s exactly what I had to wrestle with when questioning whether to join a copywriting community.

    Right now you’re probably in one of two camps.

    Camp #1 – You’re thinking about becoming a member of a copywriting community, and wondering if it will:

    • be a good investment of your time and money
    • arm you with the copywriting skills you want to work on
    • be populated with “your kind of people”
    • (most importantly) deliver the type of work you really want

    Camp #2 – You’ve just joined TCCS and you’re a bit like, “What the badger is all of this? Where do I start? And when do the jobs happen?”

    In the past 18 months I’ve shimmied from camp one to camp two. But wherever you’re currently sitting, I hope I can unburden your mind with some insight into what to expect if you join TCCS, and how to make the most of your first week in the community.  

     

    #1 Write your directory listing

    Pop this at the top of your to-do list as soon as you join. Getting your name, face and business blurb into the directory is a big step towards landing work. Plus, if you find writing about yourself and what you do tough, completing your listing will be a useful exercise.

    Once it’s live, keep an eye on the number of views. Use this opportunity to experiment with your business messaging and test whether the changes attract more or less attention.  

     

    #2 Get stuck into the FB community

    Prepare to sink your feet into the warmest welcome mat on the whole of social media (IMHO). When you join the Clever Copywriting community on Facebook you’ll be introduced in a tagged post. Be prepared to engage.

    It’s a busy, warm and welcoming group. There’s no judgement, and there are no silly questions. Spend some time reading past posts, offering thoughtful responses to current discussions, and taking up any challenges that might push you out of your copywriting skill comfort zone (such as doing a Facebook Live intro for the first time).

    copywriter community

     

    #3 Check the events

    Working solo is hard, especially if you’re an extrovert like me. TCCS combats loneliness with regular events such as Coffee Chats and regional get-togethers.

    In your first week, commit to joining a half-hour Coffee Chat. It’s a really easy way to pick up new copywriting skills and chew the business fat with folks going through similar experiences. There’s a loose discussion topic, but honestly the interaction is worth it’s weight in guava coffee beans.

     

    #4 Watch the New Member Makeovers

    This is where I found most of the gold in my first week. Questions I’d been procrastinating over for months and copywriting skills I didn’t even consider working on were tackled during these 40-minute videos.

    To give you a taste, here’s what I learned:

    • How to think about packages
    • How to add personality to your brand
    • How to keep a constant flow of work
    • Setting financial goals and
    • How to sort out guest blogging.

    And that was from just three of the videos. (There’s plenty more.)

     

    #5 Be brave and apply for jobs

    Can you really find jobs in The Clever Copywriting School community?

    Yes, yes, a million times yes. Before I joined, I didn’t believe it when current members said, “There are so many jobs.” Yeah, maybe one or two a week.

    via GIPHY

    Jobs from a rainbow of industries are posted daily, so there are heaps of opportunities for everyone. Get a handle on the format by watching a couple, and then just go for it. Be bold. Be brave. And believe in your copywriting skills.

    Update: I scored my first job subbing for another copywriter at the end of my second week of membership. Yup, that quick. 

    copywriter community

     

    Ultimately, do what’s right for your business

    Hopefully this has given you the straight-talking answers you need if you haven’t yet become a member of The Clever Copywriting School. Or some clarity if you’re new here and feeling a tad overwhelmed with what to watch, download, complete and engage with in your first week.  

     

    Which camp are you in?

    If you’re in the first camp and still sitting on the fence about joining a copywriting community, hit us with the questions and concerns that are holding you back.  

    For those who are already TCCS members, what do you remember about your first week in the community?

    If you liked this article, please share.

     

    About Rose

    Rose Crompton is a website, blog and email copywriter for small B2C and B2B businesses. Knowing no-one hooks up with boring brands, Rose uses her tip-top writing skills to stop her client’s copy from sounding run-of-the-mill.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    Get your groove back with an EOFY business check-up

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Joh Kohler

     

    It’s almost the end of the financial year (EOFY) in Australia. And you know what that means, freelancers. Yes, you can celebrate with Tim Tams instead of Milk Arrowroots in your morning cuppa. Woo-hoo!

    Let’s be honest. Without a corporate drinks budget the EOFY isn’t as much fun as it used to be. But that’s about to change.

    Because starting now, the EOFY means it’s time for your annual business check-up partay. Let’s see how you’ve gone this year and plan for where you want to be next year.

    I know you’d rather be drinking Prosecco on the boss’s dime. Unfortunately, these days the boss’s dime is your dime. But don’t worry, you can still party like it’s 30 June.

    Just grab this excellent annual appraisal template and your slightly-less-sad tea-dunking biscuits and let’s get to it!

    To get the party vibe going, I’ve created this EOFY party playlist just for you.

     

    Stop. Collaborate and listen

    Track: Ice Ice Baby, Vanilla Ice

    First, stop and check your goals and expectations. Let’s see how you went against the plans you had for yourself this year.

    Are you on track? What goals did you smash? What goals didn’t you quite get there with, and why?

    Don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t tick them all off. Things happen. Plans change. But this is a chance to ask yourself why, and see if you need to do anything differently next year. (Or you might decide those goals don’t suit your business anymore, which is fine too.)

     

    Clients can be tricky, tricky, tricky, tricky

    Track: It’s Tricky, Run-DMC

    Clients are what it’s all about. You’re here for them, but it can be a rollercoaster ride. Some clients are sweet little dreams.

    They give excellent briefs, provide specific feedback, and pay on time. (Gotta love that.)

    But others are… well, we’ve all had a PITA or two. How have your clients been this year? Did you pick up some dreams, or a bunch of nightmares?

    What lessons have you learnt from those PITA clients? Was it you, or them (or both)? There’s a lot to consider and review when it comes to how you manage your client relationships.

     

     

    Check yo self before you wreck yo self

    Track: Check Yo Self, Ice Cube

    As a copywriter, your approach to your work can make or break you. If you let yourself get too distracted or deflated when things don’t go to plan, you’ll start to feel that running your own business is worse than gainful employment. (It’s not. Okay, it is. But it’s really not.)

    Checking in on yourself is essential. You need to understand your motivations and your way of working. You need to find a way to run your business and have a life. (Yes, it is possible.)

    And if things are feeling a little out of control, use this business check-up party to set better plans and processes for next year.

     

    Can your copy dig it?

    Track: Whoomp! (There It Is), Tag Team

    Ugh. Reviewing your actual copywriting is H.A.R.D. It’s fine to say you could do better at your processes or your financial management because that’s not what you do, right? What you do is write. You communicate.

    You put your heart and soul into every last letter.

    So it’s hard to admit maybe you didn’t write beautifully all the time. Maybe there was that one client whose brief was so thin you tried to pull it out of the air, only to have the project turn pear-shaped.

    Or perhaps you need to admit that without Grammarly, your work would be full of typos. But it’s important to review your actual work. Is your writing process working? Are you a better copywriter this year? They’re hard questions in this part of the appraisal, but there’s gold in the answers.

     

    Push it real good

    Track: Push It, Salt-N-Pepa

    For people who write marketing words for a living, us copywriters can find it hard to put ourselves out there. Sadly, clients won’t just appear out of nowhere.

    So you need to market your services. Now’s the time to check in with your marketing, brand and presence. You know what you need to be doing, so use this opportunity to give yourself the kick up the behind you need to start doing it. Celebrate your marketing successes, and set a few goals for your brand over the next year.

     

     

    Makes me wonder how I keep from goin’ under 

    Track: The Message, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five

    Talking financials might make you want to crawl under the blanket with a spoon and a tub of ice cream*, but it’s got to be done.

    You may be a copywriter because you’ve always loved writing, but you know you love writing more when someone’s paying you cold hard cash to do it. Be ruthless when you review this section.

    If your revenue is lagging, this pricing course might help you decide if you’re charging enough. Put actual numbers on actual paper (I know you prefer words, but go with it). Your next-year-EOFY-self will thank you, I promise.

    *I have never crawled under the blanket with a spoon and a tub of ice cream. (It was Nutella.)

     

    You’ve got the power

    Track: The Power, SNAP!

    Give yourself a loud round of applause. The hardest part of your annual appraisal is over. Yes, you’ve almost finished your EOFY business check-up. And you survived.

    Now it’s time to put it all together and think how you did overall. What were your biggest wins and most significant areas for improvement? Once you can answer those questions, you’ll have the power to move forward and take your copywriting business where you want it to go.

     

    On your mark, ready set, let’s go

    Track: Getting’ Jiggy Wit It, Will Smith

    Last song and last task. This one’s the fun one. It’s time to set your action plans and business goals for the next financial year.

    Look at what you’ve discovered about your business, and design your goals to improve the areas that need a little help and make the most of the stuff you’re doing well. Don’t forget to make your goals SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely. Because a goal that isn’t smart is a goal you won’t achieve.

     

     

    Operation Grown Up Business

    Encore track: Bust A Move, Young MC

    Today was my EOFY business check-up party (rock on). I used the annual appraisal form to honestly and thoughtfully review my year as a copywriter.

    As a result, I’m launching Operation Grown Up Business #OGUB. It’s aimed at improving my part-time business and getting it ready to go full-time. I need to improve my processes (and set up a grown-up business bank account). While partying to the music of my youth, I’ve been planning the business of my future. Now I know what things I want to do, learn, get rid of, and keep in my business over the next 12 months.

    To keep me honest, here are my top five goals for Operation Grown Up Business:

    1. Achieve a set revenue goal each month

    I’ve come up with a challenging, yet attainable monthly amount I want to (and need to) achieve next year.

    1. Launch a new product/service

    I’ve been playing with the idea of launching a new service to help my clients. It’s not entirely new—I already do it occasionally. But next year I’m going to do it (and sell it) better.

    1. Publish one blog per month on my website

    This is going to be tough. I always feel like I’m too busy writing content for clients to write content for me. So I’m going to become my own client and plan a strategy and schedule for my blogs. (Why can’t we do for ourselves what we do for our clients?)

    1. Refine my processes

    I have processes. But they could be better. A lot better. By the end of the next financial year (hopefully earlier) my processes will be refined, documented and followed to a tee.

    1. Complete a course or attend a conference

    This one’s easy. CopyCon 2019 here I come.

     

    How did your EOFY business check-up party go?

    How’d you go? Got some goals set? Feeling ready to wrap this financial year up and move onto the next? Rediscovered your love of ‘80s and ‘90s hip-hop? Tell us what you learnt from your EOFY business check-up party in the comments. 

    If you liked this article, please share:

     

    About Joh Kohler

    Johanna Kohler Bio image

    Joh Kohler creates compelling content and copy for small businesses, big brands and government agencies. When she’s not writing, she likes to dance (badly). You can follow Joh on Facebook at Compelling Copy.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop