What to do when copywriting work goes quiet.

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Kate Merryweather

     

    Quiet times happen to us all. As a copywriter with seven years of experience, I recently found myself in a quiet stage. What did I do? Got busy.

    Here’s 19 productive steps you can take to get ahead, improve your processes and find new clients when copywriting work goes quiet.

    From upping your network game to preparing content in advance to stalking leads on LinkedIn, there’s plenty of work to be done that will pay off down the line. Your future self will thank you.

     

    1. Panic. Seriously, if work is getting quiet, now is a perfectly good time to panic.

    It’s your livelihood. When you have bills and mortgages to pay, it can be incredibly stressful to lose income. So, don’t listen to anyone who says not to panic. That’s nuts. Panic as much as you want. Then move on to the rest of the items on this list.

     

     

    2. Watch the TCCS (and other) job boards like a mofo.

    Don’t email responses. Give the leads a call. First in gets the curly fries.

     

    3. Audit your website.

    Freshen up outdated pages, optimise your images, ensure it’s responsive and mobile friendly. Does your website looks like it belongs in 2019 or 2012? For the love of pancakes, get rid of any sliders on your website. Plus, banish any images of fingers tapping on keyboards. (Could it *be* any more cliché?)

     

     

    4. Gather case studies.

    Publish them on your website so your portfolio is looking smick.

     

    5. Consider your niche.

    By specialising in an area, you can establish a reputation for being the go-to expert copywriter in real estate, finance, beauty or lifestyle brands.

     

    6. Brush up on your LinkedIn game.

    Request connections from potential clients in your niche, and post content on how you can solve their problems. Refine your bio, ask for referrals and leave thoughtful comments (Gary Vee says 90 comments per day but he’s nuts.) Publish interesting posts, showing off your pithy writing skills in the process. Instead of posting links to your blog, write native LinkedIn articles and watch your visibility soar. Do Kate’s LinkedIn course.

     

    7. Take a deep dive into your SEO and find out which pages are ranking best.

    Do one of The Recipe for SEO Success courses to jump a few notches on the Google search rankings.

     

    8. Sort out your Google My Business page.

    Write posts, add images and invite customers to give you reviews. I find humorous I’m-not-begging-but-I-am-begging requests work.

     

    9. Write blogs in advance.

    When you’re busy down the track, you’ll have pre-written blog posts prepared and ready to publish.

     

     

    10. Unless you are starving, don’t reduce your prices to be more competitive.

    On the contrary. Review your prices by doing the Toon pricing course.

     

    11. Update your timesheeting process.

    Watching the clock is the only way to see exactly how long jobs take you and which are most profitable.

     

    12. Guest blog. Pitch guest articles for high domain authority websites.

    You will raise your profile and you may get a juicy backlink which helps your SEO.

     

    13. Increase your network.

    Your clients may need suppliers like developers, photographers, videographers, graphic designers and social media managers. You can helpfully refer your clients to your network of experts (and they can refer to you too = $ker-ching$).

     

    14. Review your workflow.

    How can you automate oft-repeated processes? Write a sequence of emails as templates for each step in your copywriting process. Check out workflow and project management tools like Asana, Basecamp or Dubsado so your client experience is ultra profesh.

     

    15. Polish up your proposals.

    Ditch your dorky Microsoft Word proposal and create something snazzy on Canva

     

     

    16. Network.

    Kick off your moccasins, pluck your monobrow and enter the world of face-to-face networking. Wear your TCCS ‘copy beast’ badge as a conversation starter.

     

    17. Tell people you are available.

    A regular client of mine was surprised when I told her things were quiet. She hadn’t been giving me briefs because she thought I was busy. So, when copywriting work goes quiet, get in touch with previous clients and let them know you’re available.

     

    18. Subcontract to other TCCS members.

    There are plenty of opportunities for subcontracting to senior copywriters. Put your hand up.

     

    19. Update your email signature.

    You can do cool things like beg for ask for reviews, share your availability over coming weeks or link to your newsletter.

     

    Guess what?

    I’ve been following the items on this list and I’ve booked in two juicy projects. So it works.

     

    But also?

    My slump coincided with school holidays, so I’ve been playing Footy Feud, learning to floss, watching Disney movies and making apple cakes in my Thermomix. So it’s cool to take a break from freelancing. My list is here when you need it.

     

     

    About Kate Merryweather

    Kate is a freelance copywriter and mum of three who annoys people by talking about her Thermomix. She specialises in copywriting for digital marketing agencies and likes borrowing books from the library she will never read.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    Freelancing Websites: A New Copywriter’s Best Friend?

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Dean Mackenzie 

     

    When it comes to winning copywriting jobs, freelance platforms generally get a bad rap.

    But, that doesn’t mean you should shy away from them, like you would a dead mouse in a Mountain Dew can. (Yeah, that was a thing.)

    There are some good reasons to use freelance jobs sites, especially when you’re starting out. 

    In this post I’m going to share five reasons why the Upworks of the world could actually help you break into the wonderful world of copywriting, along with three easy ways to establish yourself on these websites.

     

    When most copywriters hear the words “Upwork” or “Freelancer”, they generally have one thought:

    But I’m here to say that ,while freelance job websites aren’t a sparkly dreamland of rainbows and unicorns, they’re not all bad either.

     

    “We get no respect”

    To paraphrase the comedian Rodney Dangerfield, freelancing websites get no respect from ‘true’ copywriters and content writers.

    Why not? Well, let’s look at some of the popular perceptions:

    • Only new, desperate or sub-standard copywriters float around such sites
    • These copywriters desperately scratch for whatever pickings they can find
    • The jobs they fight over are usually the out-of-their-mind “ten dollars for a thousand words” type

    And to some degree, that’s all true.

    There are a lot of new and under-performing copywriters hanging around freelancing platforms.

    They do ‘low ball’ to score whatever job they can.

    And clients are often looking for jobs that are cheap and fast, with scant regard to nasty.

    But guess what? For most genuine copywriters, that’s a good thing.

    Working in this kind of environment, as icky and unpleasant as it sounds, delivers some great experience and lessons. Lessons that are starkly relevant once the copywriter breaks out of their cocoon and emerges into the real world.

    But let’s dig a little deeper.

     

    Why freelancing websites don’t completely suck

     

    1. They’re a perfect place to build experience

    As a new copywriter, it can be hard to get clients.

    You might have read books, done courses, and snagged the odd job off a friend or family member. But you still end up hearing this:

    What’s a copywriter cub to do?

    Well, you’re going to need practice. Lots of it. As quickly as you can.

    Freelance writing platforms are positively bulging with opportunities to sharpen your copywriting skills.

    One of my first jobs on Upwork was writing bi-weekly insurance blogs (yeah, fascinating subject) for ten dollars an hour.

    Looking back, those posts weren’t my greatest work. But working on them for a couple of months improved my glacial writing speed no end.

    Almost every job I did during my first 6-9 months on the platform taught me something. And I carry those lessons with me to this day.

    Bonus experience benefit

    Many clients don’t hire people sight unseen. If they come to you, they’ve either checked out your blogs, know of your work elsewhere, or will ask for some samples. Deliver first-class copy and content with those first jobs and you’ll quickly build a portfolio you’ll be proud to show prospective clients.

     

    2. It lets you develop your business

    Upwork (and other freelance writing websites) have a particular policy that’s gotten more than a few freelancers in trouble:

    You can’t steal clients from Upwork and into your tender bosom.

    Doing so will get you ingloriously booted off their site as soon as they find out.

    But this doesn’t mean you can’t be working on your business in practically every other way.

    Platforms such as these let you develop almost everything you’ll need when you strike out into the brave new world beyond:

    • Processes: How will you get the info you need from a client? How do you handle unresponsiveness? How do you tackle feedback?
    • Clients: Who are your ideal clients? What traits do you like in them? How do you deal with ‘pain in the you-know-what’ (PITA) clients?
    • Marketing: How will you stand out from the competition? (More on that in a mo.)

    3. You can practice your pitch

    When you’ve got oodles of current clients or referrals flooding in, you’re set.

    But when you need to hunt for clients, you’ll be pitching.

    A lot.

    As a new copywriter, you need to sell yourself.

    On Upwork, this takes the form of proposals. If you see a job that sounds like a perfect match, you write a ‘proposal  (i.e. an eloquentified message that’s basically, “Pick me, pick me!”) and hope they get back to you.

    A lot of copywriters hate proposal writing because:

    1. a) it takes time
    2. b) there’s no guaranteed return
    3. c) it’s freaking hard to do

    Fortunately, a lot of writers lazily use a copy/paste approach. So if you’re prepared to put in a little work and refine your proposals over time, you’ll start winning work.

    The truth is, until you’re established on Upwork you have to do a lot of pitching.

    The nice part is this can and does turn around. When you have the experience and the results, clients will start to approach you.

    When I started, my pitch wasn’t much more than:

     “I’m a copywriter. Your job sounds great. Why don’t you hire me?”

    I’m actually surprised it won any jobs at all.

    But as I slowly worked out how to market myself, these proposals became more conversational. I asked more questions, and talked about how I’d theoretically go about doing their job.

    Pro tip: Clients love it when you give feedback on their projects from the get-go. It can be a lot of extra effort, but if you find a job you really want to win it’s a great strategy.

     

    4. You can actually build relationships

    On freelance writing sites, jobs are usually one-off affairs with little more than a “That’s great, thanks. I’ll close the job and complete payment”.

    But sometimes a job turns out to be more. Much more.

    I’ve built numerous relationships that started as a single engagement.

    One of the best examples is a couple of e-commerce emails I wrote for an online furniture retailer. It turned into a series of weekly blog posts, and became a complete rewrite of their website. All up, a couple of thousand dollars of work.

    If you’re improving your skills and business processes (points 1 and 2), these relationships develop without any extra work on your part.

    Professionalism isn’t common on freelance writing platforms. It’s a semi-rare, valuable resource. And clients love it.

     

    5. You can earn some extra cash

    I left this one ‘til last, even though it’s usually the first reason people are on places like Upwork.

    This one’s so far down the list because if you’re intent on becoming a copywriter and building your own business, cash at this point is almost secondary.

    Sharpening your skills, improving your processes, knowing how to pitch and building relationships are all more important reasons to be spending time on freelance platforms.

    In light of these, whatever cash you earn is effectively a bonus.

    That said, whatever funds you bring in can be put to good use. If your full-time work is paying the bills, the odd writing job can boost your business with things like:

    • Getting a website built
    • Buying some courses
    • Getting some coaching
    • Grabbing a few tools (e.g. templates. And here’s just the place for that)

    All without having to pay for them out of your own wallet.

     

    But before you dive in…

    Maybe you’re new or somewhat inexperienced in the great game of copywriting.

    And maybe you’re thinking of jumping onto a freelance writing site right now and banging out blogs ‘til the cows come home.

    If that’s the case…

    The biggest trap people fall into on these platforms is thoughtlessly hurling themselves in—signing up in a flash, slapping together a profile, and sending proposal after proposal in scattergun style.

    But you’re going to be different.

    There are dozens of ways to give yourself an edge. Bu let’s zero in on three.

     

    1. Prepare your profile

    Your website (if you have one) is your sales page. Your LinkedIn profile is another.

    And so is your profile page on any freelance writing platform you’re part of.

    It’s something a lot of people don’t realise. They just dash one together and go hunting for work. By simply paying some attention to this, you’ll have an immediate advantage over a lot of your competition before you send out a single proposal.

    Without going into too much detail, Here’s what you can do to stand out:

    • Use a tagline that’s eye catching and specific
    • Choose keywords to attract the types of job you want
    • Structure your overview or description just like you would a sales page (e.g. open in an interesting way, spell out big benefits, use testimonials, end with a call to action)

     

    2. Don’t be afraid to ask for the rate you want

    There’s plenty of ‘race to the bottom’ competition on Upwork.

    You don’t want to be one of them.

    Sure, your first few jobs might not bring in the big bucks. That’s fine. Everyone has to start from somewhere.

    But if you can do a job well, and demonstrate you do it well, set your price and show your value. There are clients who appreciate that on these platforms. And, if you deliver the results they’ll happily pay you for it.

     

    If at first you don’t succeed…

    When you first jump on Upwork and apply for some jobs, you might win some.

    But you might not.

    Freelance writing platforms are as much an exercise in persistence as anything else. You can do all the right things and not get a nibble some days, only to find two or three clients chasing you the next day without having done anything differently.

    If you’re not winning many jobs early on, don’t give in to the temptation to quit. There are two big things you can do to turn the tide:

    1. Keep refining your pitch: Are you writing proposals that would sound interesting or exciting if you were looking to hire?
    2. Look at how you qualify jobs to apply for: Are you grabbing at anything, or only jobs you’re well-suited for? Target jobs that complement your specific skills.

     

    Be there for a reason

    As the poem goes, people come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime.

    Upwork – or any freelancing website – won’t be part of your copywriting life forever. But they do serve a purpose, especially when you’re a fledgling writer uncertain of how to start.

    Use these platforms wisely, and you’ll soon have the skills and experience you need to launch your copywriting business into the world.

     

    Over to you

    Have you ever used a freelancing website? What was your experience with them?

     

    About Dean Mackenzie

    Dean Mackenzie is a Melbourne-based copywriter who specialises in direct response copywriting — that is, copy specifically designed to sell. His work focuses on landing pages, emails and sales pages, along with the odd website and blog. He’s also fond of a good cup of tea.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    22 top tips to tackle your to-do list

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    It’s time to get organised people

    We busy copywriters have a lot to do: clients to hassle, copy to cajole; and then all those Facebook posts that we just HAVE TO scroll through.

    But there are only so many hours in the day.

    And it sure ain’t easy trying to do ALL THE THINGS.

    So, we asked our Clever Copy beasts to share their top time management tips that help them get through the day without slapping a kitten.

    Here are 22 hot tips that might just save your sanity:

     

    Tip #1: DING DING

    Turn off the ‘ding ding’ social media notifications and turn the tomato timer on. It helps you get through deadlines. (Nerissa Bentley)

     

    Tip #2: 3 THINGS

    I do three things a day that are related to the big goals I set at the end of last year. And doing similar tasks together helps save time. (Rashida Tayabali)

     

    Tip #3: BYE BYE FB

    Close Facebook. Simple. (Eli Osh)
    Psst: I recommend using KILL NEWS FEED Chrome browser extension. Kate.

     

    Tip #4: ASANA RULES

    I use Asana to rule the world manage work and home life. Its app and desktop functionality means that wherever I am I can create quick tasks so I don’t forget things or miss deadlines. (Heather Woods)

     

    Tip #5: BLOCK IT

    I’m a fan of blocking out time in my calendar (which I do in advance for the week ahead). Example: Tomorrow will be three hours of writing and three hours of marketing. (Dean Mackenzie)

     

    Tip #6: FIRST HOUR FREE

    Don’t look at your phone or computer for at least the first hour of your day. I find that on the days I do this, I have much greater mental clarity and am much more productive. (Sandra Muller)

     

    Tip #7: FREEZE IT

    I spend one day a month freezing meals so I don’t worry about cooking when I’ve got too much going on. It’s one less house task to deal with, and I can focus on work. (Marie-Pier Rochon)

     

    Tip #8: WIP IT REAL GOOD

    I use the fabulous Work-In-Progress Tracker — Kate’s best invention and my lifesaver. I can view all my projects in the blink of an eye, and I know which ones have priority. (Claudia Bouma)

     

    Tip #9: SCRUNCH IT

    Write your to-do list the night before so you don’t waste time faffing or thinking about what you need to do. These days, thanks to Amanda VanElderen’s fab system, SCRUNCHIT™, my to-do list is a pile of Post-its with an individual task on each one. I put them in order and start with the first, then the second and so on, never deviating from the order.
    I take great satisfaction in scrunching up each little square of sticky paper and throwing it away. (Johanna Kohler)

    Psst: Amanda is trying to make ScrunchIT a ‘thing’. Don’t encourage her. Kate

     

    Tip #10: MUST DO

    I close my email app and schedule times to check it. Then I start off with my must-do list of five items.  (Sandy Forbes Taylor)

     

    Tip #11: RACE TO THE FINISH

    I have an anti-procrastination day where I do the stuff that’s been on my list for more than a week. I put 15 minutes on the timer, then race to beat it. (Jasmine Andrews)

     

    Tip #12: FLYING HIGH

    I switch my phone to airflight mode so I don’t get distracted by notifications.
    Then I add an alarm clock that goes off every hour and a half to check things. (Pauline La Cruz)

     

    Tip #13: EARLY WORM

    I love starting work at crazy o’clock (5 or 6am) so I can smash out a few hours before emails and phone calls start flooding in.  (Alicia Kacar)

     

    Tip #14: COLOUR CODE

    I have a spreadsheet for my to-do list with 3-5 items on it each day. I colour code everything in terms of urgency to know where I need to focus my attention. But the number one tactic is to give myself a stern talking to and just get down to work.  (Cath Fowler)

     

    Tip #15: SUNDAY BEST

    I write out a plan for the week on Sunday. It takes all of 15 minutes, and means I don’t waste half of Monday trying to work out what to do while worrying that I’m not actually doing it.  (Emily Rhodes)

     

    Tip #16: WORK NAKED

    Don’t waste precious minutes choosing your outfit for the day. Roll out of bed and get straight to work, even if you sleep naked. (Tegan Ang)

     

    Tip #17: SMALL WINS

    I make a list of big and small tasks. When I need to take a step back from a big task I try and complete some small tasks. It makes me feel like I’m still accomplishing something. I’m also trying to implement a ‘do it now rather than later’ approach.  (Jodie North)

     

    Tip #18: TEN MIN TACKLING

    If a task doesn’t take more than ten minutes, I do it then and there rather than marking it to do later. It gets those pesky little jobs off my desk. (Steve May)

     

    Tip #19: LAY IT OUT

    I leave a few tools open on my laptop that I’ll need for the following workday. The stuff is ‘laid out’ to save time (e.g. Airmail, And.Co, MS Word/Google Drive).  (Diana Gaffney)

     

    Tip #20: TEMPLATES FOR THE WIN

    Templates! I was always a big fan of templates, and of course the copy shop ones are next level. Saves so much thinking time for recurring tasks. (Jenny Lindsay)

     

    Tip #21: BE FREE(DCAMP)

    I use the Freedcamp app. But my favourite is actually a spin off from project days —writing on my wardrobe door. I have three columns: Must do today, what’s on for tomorrow, and ‘Yays’ (for the stuff that’s done). And I write the tasks on Post-it notes so they’re easy to move. (Beck Co)

     

    Tip #22: COMMUTE

    Even though I work in my back garden, I take my commute seriously. I pack a lunch, lots of fluids and all the bits I’m going to need for the day. This stops me heading back into the house to grab something and getting distracted. (Kate Toon)

     

    Bonus tip: Bladder of steel

    Weeing is for losers. Work on that pelvic floor people (do blokes have a pelvic floor?), and see how long you can work without popping to the loo. Or invest in an executive copywriting bucket. *

    * Please do not follow this advice, it’s not medically safe.

     

    Over to you

    What’s your top time saving tip? Share it in the comments below:

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    Tidy desk or messy desk, what does it say about you?

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    7 Clever Copywriters share their desks

    Tidy desk, tidy mind?

    I’m not sure I entirely believe in the old idiom, my desk is super tidy but my mind? Not so much.

    Others argue that work amid a mess of clutter can actually make you more creative.

    I asked some of the members of the Clever Copywriting School to share their desks and bravely they sent in their snaps.

    (Oh and no meanness about the messy ones – this is a no judgement zone.)

    Kate Toon Desk

    Kate Toon
    “I clean my desk every morning, it’s a great way to faff around and stop myself doing real work.”

     

     

    Jodi Gibson desk

    Jodi Gibson
    “I can only start the day with a tidy desk. By the end of the day it’s a different story.”

     

     

    Kylie Saunder desk

    Kylie Saunder
    Always start day tidy. Make sure it’s like this before close door at night. Then by end of day there’s likely to be post-it’s everywhere & notebooks open with ideas jotted down for various projects.”

     

     

    Matthew Morgan Fenwick desk

    Matthew Morgan Fenwick
    “NB: the box under my desk is for my hopes and dreams.”

     

     

    Lisa Cropman Desk

    Lisa Cropman
    “It’s the only space in my house that my kids and husband don’t get to mess up (only I do!)”

     

     

    Jenny De Lacy desk

    Jenny De Lacy
    “I have a thing about apples. I have a collection of them.”

     

     

    Angely Denly Desk

    Angela Denly
    “I am a messy desk person! Your desk freaks me out. Too tidy! But I’m very organised in my head and have never missed a deadline in my life.”

     

    Over to you

    So how tidy is your desk? Do you find that a cleaner desks makes you a better copywriter? Let us know if the comments below.

     

    Long description :

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    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

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    CopyCon and XERO: The perfect partnership

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    What Xero’s sponsorship means for the Copywriting Conference


    Well slap my bottom and call me Susan, I’m SOOOO excited to announce that Xero have signed on the dotted line as the primary supporter of CopyCon.
    (It’s Australia’s first and only copywriting conference don’t you know.)

    As the conference founder, I can happily say that Xero on board means ramping up my mini mission of helping both beginner and experienced copywriters do amazing things.

    When I started CopyCon last year, I wanted to give back to the copywriting community.

    I know how lonely it can get working as a freelancer and how tough it is to work in agencies.

    The conference gives copywriters of all shapes and sizes a chance to learn, connect and build a lovely, juicy support network.

    Last year’s event was a huge success, and this year I wanted to build the momentum with fresh speakers and an amazing Mastermind event.

    Hang on a minute, what is The Copywriting Conference?

    copycon

    The Copywriting Conference helps freelance and in-house copywriters build better businesses, learn new copywriting skills, and grow revenue with practical presentations, inspirational training and a peek at the latest copywriting trends.

    Having Xero as a sponsor means we can afford to deliver an excellent conference experience while keeping costs down.

    I know that freelance copywriters don’t have huge buckets of cash.

    And I’m also chuffed because Xero is one of the few software programs I use that doesn’t disappoint. It’s a brand I personally like and admire, especially their support for small business. (They were on my dream sponsor list).

    What does the sponsorship mean for CopyCon?

    Sponsors like Xero make events like mine viable. It puts a stamp of approval on the conference and the freelance industry as a whole. It feels like we’re heading in the right direction.

    Marina Holmes, Communications & Strategic Relations Director, Xero Australia, had this to say about her decision to get involved with CopyCon.

    “It’s important to sponsor events like CopyCon. In this day in age, content cannot be underestimated as a means to connect.

    And this event is a beautiful blend of supporting storytelling and the small businesses behind the words.  (KT – so true it is!)

    There is nothing more courageous than a person willing to embrace entrepreneurship, go out on their own and create a business from the ground up.”

    The feedback from 2017 CopyCon was exceptional and I felt there was something really special about the first year. It was amazing to meet a whole bunch of people for the first time in real life.

    Yes, we all connect online via The Clever Copywriting School Community and other groups, but there’s something incredible about meeting in person.

    CopyCon brought us all together.

    And this year it will again.

    There’s a tangible, fluffy kind of excitement that comes from people just wanting to learn and hear from speakers who are there to make a difference in their businesses. Plus we have really good muffins.

    Meet Marina

    Marina Holmes

    The other good news is that Marina Holmes from Xero will be giving a presentation around Xero’s overall content strategy (more details coming soon).

    “Leading a communications team for a company with more than 500,000 small businesses customers across Australia, I am lucky enough to see firsthand the lasting power of authentic storytelling.”

    Content marketing and content strategy is both a personal passion and a core business focus for the future – and Xero will continue to invest in new ideas and smart minds to bring our diverse customer stories to life.”

    So there you go people. That’s my exciting news.

     

     

    copycon

    By the way if you’re a sponsor reading this and interested in joining Xero in the cool sponsors club – just get in touch.

    P.S. I can’t finish this blog without a big thank you to Amanda Vanelderen, my erstwhile Sponsorship Manager who worked her socks of to help me create attractive sponsorship packages and charm the pants off the right people.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

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    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    School holidays: How 9 copywriters cope

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    School holidays, two words that put the fear into any freelancer.

    Many people who work for themselves did so to have the freedom and flexibility to spend that extra time with kids. But there is such a thing as too much time with your kids!

    So how do you balance work with parenting in those long school hols?
    How do you manage the mummy guilt?
    And how do you meet those pressing deadlines?

    In this post nine members of our Clever Copywriting School community share their school holiday childcare secrets.

     

    Tip 1: Spend on childcare

    “This is one occasion where throwing money at a problem really does solve the problem. My kids go to a great holiday program and they do the best stuff (I’m always a bit jealous of the cool things they’ve done).”
    Kate Merryweather

     

     

     

    Tip 2: It takes a village

    “With so many people now juggling work-at-home freelance life with the ongoing joys of parenthood, the school holidays provide a unique opportunity for village-style collaboration. Band together with other working parents and kid swap for four-hour chunks at a time so you can work in relative peace.

    This will also provide you with valuable writing time. And when you need to return the favour, you’ll often find the more kids the merrier. Organise some activities – preferably outdoor – and if you’re lucky, they’ll entertain themselves, leaving you to at least get some admin out of the way.”
    Hedgie Gundry

     

    Tip 3: Mornings work / afternoons fun

    “Most days I wake up early, from 5:30am, and go straight into the office and get started. I finish no later than 11 or 12 and then we have lunch together. In the afternoon we do something fun. If I have extra work to do, I’ll fit in an hour or so early evening, or if all else fails, when the kids are in bed.

    While I’m working in the mornings, the kids have the option of doing “jobs” to earn extra money such as $2 for a small bucket of weeds, playing or watching a movie.”
    Sandy Forbes Taylor

     

     

    Tip 4: Reduce your capacity

    “I tend to just service retainer clients and maybe one larger project through the school holidays. As for the kids, we have the odd pyjama day with back-to-back screens, but usually I try at least a morning or afternoon activity for the younger one and the older one arranges his own fun.

    We also have a pool and a trampoline, basketball net, cricket bats, balls, skipping ropes etc. so there is loads of stuff to keep them busy.”
    Nicole Leedham

     

     

    Tip 5: Pay kids for housework

    “I work fewer hours during holiday time and schedule work-free days.
    I’m a morning person, so I tend to get up a bit earlier to work during holiday time. My brain is at its best then, so I can get a few hours of good, solid work done, and then be free for the afternoon.
    If they’re not still sleeping, my kids usually watch a movie, play on their iPads, or play a board game during their e-free time. I also I pay them to do the housework. That way, all the work gets done, we all earn a bit of money, and we all have time to go and enjoy spending that money!”

    Nerissa Bentley

     

     

    Tip 6: Give yourself a break

    “If the children watch a bit more TV than usual during the holidays, it’s not the end of the world. Parents with jobs outside the home don’t know what their kids are doing 100% of the time at daycare or in a holiday program.

    Also, just like us adults, sometimes our kids are worn out by the time holidays come around. Some lazy days watching TV, reading books and hanging out quietly at home can be just what they need.”

    Being entertained 24/7 can be exhausting for everyone.”
    Liz Green

     

     

    Tip 7: Use TV, bribery and invite over other kids

    “Usually in the school holidays my winning formula is a few days of activities (we like taekwondo camp and art class) combined with more TV and bribery.

    ‘Hey kids, this morning we are going out to do x, and then this afternoon, I need you guys to amuse yourselves while mummy does a bit of work.’

    (I find it works better with my kids if I do the thing with them first, rather than the activity/outing being an afternoon reward after letting me work.)

    I also think books and Lego as Christmas presents are a godsend for those long weeks of January!

    Having other kids over is also a winner – they tend to all just entertain each other more then, leaving me free to get on with whatever I need to do. I also recommend having lots of food available that the kids can just help themselves to.”
    Angela Denly

     

     

    Tip 8: Become a vampire

    1. Stock up on coffee and wine
    2. Plan activities to exhaust little darlings
    3. Fight little darlings into bed
    4. Assume vampire status (to clarify this means working early in the morning or late at night)

    Heather Woods

     

     

    Tip 9: Vacation care

    “This holidays I’ve got my girls booked for three days vacation care each week – and my mum can take them the other two days if need be.

    Having the girls in vacation care actually gives me more hours in the day to work so I try to pack more in on those days so that we can enjoy a day off together during the holidays too.”
    Alison Strachan

     

     

    How do you cope?

    Do you have any extra tips you can share with your fellow copywriters? Do you have any wise advice of juggling work load and small humans?

    Share your thoughts in the comments below.

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop