An interview with Copywriter Melinda Leyshon

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Melinda Leyshon from Awards Agency

    Who are you Melinda Leyshon?

    I’m Melinda Leyshon, CEO and Chief Awards Addict at Awards Agency. I help businesses develop awards submissions that don’t just tick the boxes. They stand out like a tutu at a nudist colony

    • I’ve delivered winners at Local, State and National levels.
    • I’ve delivered industry-specific award winners, customer service winners, and businessperson of the year winners.
    • I’ve delivered many incredibly deserving Telstra Women’s Business Awards finalists and helped clients win the gold over consecutive years.
    • I’m a judge for a number of award programs, including the international Stevie Awards and the Australian Institute of Marketing Awards.
    • And my success rate is more than 90%.

    But for me, business awards are more than about the bling. They’re also about finding your business voice, evaluating where you are (as well as where you’ve come from and where you want to go), and using the platform to establish your business as an industry leader. When I’m not whispering sweet somethings in the ears of judges, I share the secrets of writing via Awards Agency Academy. But one thing I won’t share is my stash of chocolate-covered liquorice. Just try me.

    What did you do before you became a copywriter?

    I was in tax and legal publishing (not very exciting) before moving into education (still not very exciting). Then I moved into small business to turn my ex-husbands flailing business around. And in the process, I discovered the power of business awards and the secrets to smashing them.

    How long have you been copywriting?

    Around seven or eight years, I think.

    What has been your biggest copywriting career win?

    Growing from being a soloist to having a team—and all from nada.

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    Luckily I haven’t had too many of those. And I’ve wiped the ones I did have from my memory. But recently I received a complaint about spelling errors. We’d run spellcheck, but then I double-checked in Hemmingway and there they were—three little buggers in amongst about 6,000 words. It thought that was okay, but apparently she didn’t.

    What’s your number one fave copywriting tool?

    How can I choose one? Actually, I’ve only just taken to Pinterest (late bloomer). I’m quite visual and use colours and shapes sometimes to help me find the right words.

    How do you deal with self-doubt?

    I go back to my numbers. Clients are happy, awards are being won. The evidence is all there. Alternatively, I call in sick and watch Netflix. I know we all joke about it, but mental health days are important.

    What work-life balance/ mental health tips do you have?

    I’m the worst person to ask! We recently moved into an office, and the difference it has made to me personally is huge. I had anxiety about my team having to see my disheveled mess, and I had no separation between work and home. And while I still work from home, the delineation is easier and I’m more productive. I’m also developing much stronger relationships with local clients who love the pop-in (not to mention the local baristas).

    What tip would you pass onto any newbie copywriters?

    Keep learning. Stalk people. Find someone who’s work you love and ask them to mentor you. We’re all different in terms of our writing style and our skills, so find someone whose work you love and whose personality you like. We all had to learn somewhere (and I honestly believe good copywriters are the ones who push themselves and keep learning). I hate getting out of my comfort zone, but I love what it creates.

     

    What’s next for you?

    Well, we’re launching an agency! It will be a parent to WriteCopy (tender/business writing) and Awards Agency (Business Awards) and reflect a lot of what we do, which is the creative stuff. We’re always learning so we’re always evolving. For me, it’s about putting the right people in the right places to solve my client’s needs. And it’s all coming together.

    Why do you love TCCS?

    OMG, for WAY too many reasons. I’ve met some of my most adored friends through TCCS. I have my trusted support network there. It’s a safe place where I can ask for help on a bad day and give help on a good day. I can learn in there, help others learn, and find awesome peeps who give a shit about their work to work with us. I couldn’t love it any more than I do.

    Long description :

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    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

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    How to get the most out of your TCCS membership

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    From newbie to copybeast in 8 simple steps

    This post was written by TCCS member,  Angela Pickett

     

    How to get the most out of your TCCS membership  #copywriter #copybeast

    If I wanted a copywriting career I had to start using the resources I already had #copywriter #copybeast

    After 12 months in The Clever Copywriting School, I wanted to share some thoughts on how I’ve embraced my inner copybeast.

    If you’ve just joined TCCS – welcome.

    But if you’re sitting on the fence then I hope what I’m about to share will convince you to sign up.

    When I joined, I wasn’t even sure what a copywriter did.

    A friend introduced me to another member who needed a blog post written for a client. I wrote it, got paid for it, and began my copywriting career.

    Despite my interest and enthusiasm, I spent six months sitting on the sidelines. I kept using my lack of formal training as an excuse not to build my business.

    I argued that I didn’t know where to start. But the truth is I was a bit scared.

    But at the beginning of 2019 I decided I wanted to quit my part-time job by the end of June.

    I knew that if I wanted a copywriting career I had to start using the resources I already had. This wasn’t about doing another course.

    I had to start showing up instead of complaining I was a newbie with no experience. And if I was sick of writing that, imagine how everyone else felt.

    So here are my tips to help you don your copybeast cape much sooner than I did.

     

    1. Join the coffee chats and training calls

    It’s scary when Kate Toon asks you to share your unique selling proposition (USP). But once I started turning up and getting involved in the conversation, I gained confidence and knowledge.

    I saw that experienced members had the same fears as me.

    I realised how generous everyone was in sharing their knowledge.

    I now know that the more often you share your USP, the better it gets. You become more confident. Hearing it out loud helps you refine the words that might look good on the page but sound lousy when you say them.

    At first I felt like an intruder. But everyone was so welcoming. And when I eventually met some copybeasts in real life, it felt like I was meeting old friends.

    2. Get a copy buddy

    In my first coffee chat this year, Kate asked if anyone needed a copy buddy. I said yes, and I hit the jackpot. My copy buddy is one of the most experienced writers in the group.

    At first, my chats with her were all about building my confidence and having someone to be accountable to. But I can now be a sounding board (as well as a proofreader) for her.

    3. Search the group, and ask questions

    There’s five years’ worth of information in the group. And because every post has a hashtag, its easy to find the right information.

    There aren’t any silly questions. People are generous with their knowledge, which is amazing when you realise we’re all competitors.

    But like any relationship, try not to make it one-sided. You might feel like a newbie, but unless you’ve been living under a rock you know things.

    4. Make the most of the membership area

    There’s so much information available to members, including masterclasses and member makeovers.

    In one makeover, Kate helped a member work out how many billable hours she had available. From there, they worked out what she needed to charge to reach her income target.

    But don’t use ‘catching up on training’ to stop you from starting. Schedule some time to watch a couple of videos every week.

    5. Buy some templates

    The templates are such a worthwhile investment.

    They save you reinventing the wheel, and make you look professional.

    Each template is like a mini-course.

    While I was working in my day job, I’d ‘treat’ myself to a couple of new templates each week.

    Search the member area and the Facebook group for suggestions about the best templates to buy first.

    6. Understand your pricing

    The pricing course was a game-changer for me.

    It showed me how long I should be spending on copywriting projects.

    More importantly, it helped me start with the right mindset about how to value my work.

    It also helped me feel more comfortable with my hourly rate when I realised half of it went towards tax and expenses.

    Do a search in the Facebook group on Profit First. And while you’re there, search the group for some frank discussions about money.

    Finally, lowering your price to get the job harms not only you but also the community as a whole.

    7. Put your hand up for jobs

    There are loads of opportunities on the job board and working for other copywriters. However, there are some rules.

    You don’t want to be bidding on jobs you have no expertise in. But at the same time, applying for jobs is a great experience. And using your new templates will make look professional when you’re applying.

    My first couple of jobs (including a four-month subcontracting job) came from this group.

    I became a full-time copywriter a month earlier than I’d planned.

    Working with more experienced copywriters is better than training.

    8. Be part of the community

    There aren’t too many other groups where competitors share so generously.

    Find the copybeasts in your area and get along to real-life catchups.

    The support from Kate and everyone in this group is amazing.

    Without it, I’d still be sitting on the sidelines doubting my ability.

    Share your wins and your challenges. Be vulnerable and put your pride to one side.

    Chances are someone in the group will be able to answer your question, or maybe just reassure you that how you’re feeling is completely normal.

    Conclusion

    If you’re a TCCS member who’s been unsure of how to get started, I hope these tips will help.

    If you’re not yet a member, I hope I’ve convinced you about the value of signing up.

    Get involved, make the most of the resources on offer, and your membership will pay for itself.

    Over to you

    If you liked this article, please share:

    About Angela Pickett:

    Angela-Pickett-Copywriter-Barossa

     

    Angela Pickett a Barossa-based copywriter who writes articulate, approachable and adventurous copy to help businesses connect with their customers wherever they are in the world.

    Long description :

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    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

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    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

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    An interview with Copywriter Lisa Cropman

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Lisa Cropman from The Word Nest

     

    Who are you Lisa Cropman?

    As a copywriter and editor, I help businesses and authors by translating jumbled thoughts into powerful messages.

     

    What did you do before you became a copywriter?

    After studying English and Media at uni, I worked at the London advertising agency J. Walter Thompson before joining the publicity department of Penguin Books. Over the next few years I hopped around from publisher to publisher, ending up as Non-Fiction Marketing Manager at Pan Macmillan – a role I absolutely loved that set me up with the skills I use today.

     

    How long have you been copywriting?

    Copywriting was always part of my role. But I launched The Word Nest and my freelance copywriting career nine years ago.

     

    What has been your biggest copywriting career win?

    Apart from finding Kate Toon (which has definitely been my biggest win to date), I’d say getting hired by American mega-coaches Jeff Slayter and Kane Minkus of ‘Industry Rockstar’, who were sharing the stage with people like Branson, Robbins, and Demartini at the time. I cut my teeth writing their direct response emails, ebooks, press releases, media kits, etc. And because they were business coaches, they had an endless stream of clients needing copywriting so they referred new business to me for years. I still don’t know how I scored that job, but I’ve always been thankful for it because it gave me the confidence and pipeline I needed in the early days.

     

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    Luckily I’ve only had one job that was a complete fail and my gut told me I should have run away from at the start. It was for a client in an industry way out of my comfort zone and a brief where I had to add new copy to an existing site that was written in a style that can best be described as ‘distinctive’. It was painful from start to finish, and I walked away without payment but with a stronger sense of when I need to say, “No”.

     

    What is your number one fave copywriting tools?

    wordhippo.com

     

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    Even after nine years, I do struggle with self-doubt – especially when I send off first drafts. To combat this, I look at all the websites I’ve written and the books I’ve edited, my repeat clients and referrals. A lot of lovely people have said a lot of lovely things about my work, so I have to trust that they can’t all be wrong.

     

    What work-life balance/ mental health tips do you have?

    A couple of years ago I edited a book called ‘Self-Care Isn’t Selfish’ and truly, it was a light bulb moment. I’d been neglecting myself, and guilt was a big part of the problem. Working on that book prompted me to hire a cleaner, sign up for a dance class and start meditating. And I can honestly say these have all contributed to better physical and mental health. So my tips are to ask for help wherever you need it, move your body, and attend to your thoughts on a daily basis. Whatever self-care means for you, it’s really important to know it’s not selfish – it’s essential.

     

    What tip would you pass onto any newbie copywriters?

    Apart from the ones I mentioned earlier, I’d say research. But know when it’s time to stop researching and start writing. I tend to over-research because I want to be all over everything. But I remind myself that time is money, and clients can usually fill in information gaps quicker than I can.

    Lisa Cropman Copywriter

     

     

    What’s next for you?

    I’d like to be braver when it comes to marketing myself, develop a stronger brand identity, and focus on ‘people and planet-friendly’ brands. I don’t have aspirations to conquer the world, but I do like using my words to help build a better one.

     

    Why do you love TCCS?

    I’ve felt isolated at times doing the freelancing thing, and this community has saved me from myself. It’s given me a place to ask questions, help others, celebrate, moan, laugh and cry. The banter, learning, and support keep me motivated in my business, and I’ve met some really gorgeous and inspiring people. I feel very lucky to be a part of it.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    7 Tips I learnt at Click Engage Convert

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Notes from Melbourne’s hottest digital marketing conference

    This post was written by TCCS member,  Kara Stokes

     

    Did you know Melbourne has its own sizzling digital marketing conference? Well, you do now.

    But what’s more important is how Loren Bartley from Impactiv8 brought marketing experts together to share their wisdom.

    The Click Engage Convert conference gave so much valuable information my fingers were tired from scribbling down notes to try and capture all the pearls.

    The core message from all the experts is that we need to focus on showing our buyers how much we love them.

    Consumers know they’re spending money, but they don’t want to think about it. They want to feel like you’re interested in them as people, not dollar signs.

    It’s time to find the squishy spot in your heart, and here are seven reasons why.

     

    1. Give more to your repeat customers

    Relationship marketing expert Jessika Phillips believes we need to make our brands crave-able.

    Gone are the days when consumers were coerced into buying.

    We need to focus on making our brand so enticing they’ll be desperate to hit the ‘add to cart’ button.

    People want to belong to a culture that resonates with the lifestyle they want. Show them how your brand is a part of that lifestyle. Get them to imagine how a purchase from you will bring them into that culture.

    It’s no longer about buying a t-shirt because your old one has holes. It’s about buying a t-shirt from a business who cares about life in the same way we do.

    After making a purchase, you can help them avoid buyer’s regret by staying interested in them. Send them a thank you email and ask what they love most about your product and if there’s anything they don’t like. Create an open conversation and get to know them.

    You want them to come back whenever they need a new t-shirt, right? So make room in your marketing budget to reward your customers.

    It’s time to invest in your repeat customers and turn them into brand advocates.

    2. Sell yourself. You’re worth it

    Copywriting expert and Beyoncé of SEO Kate Toon knows that business owners loathe selling. It brings on images of used car salesmen with slicked-back hair and smiles oilier than a $5 pizza.

    Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you could just make a thing, and people bought the thing and you made money? You probably could if you were the only business on the planet. But in the crowded world of the web, you need to make yourself seen and heard.

    The key to getting over your aversion to selling is remembering that your customer is already out there looking for you. But if you don’t meet them on socials or help them find your website, they won’t find you.

    Instead, they’ll find your competitors.

    Marketing your business isn’t like being a cold caller ringing household at dinner time with an offer ‘you can’t refuse’.

    Optimising your website, posting on Facebook and sending out flyers creates awareness of who you are and what you do.

    You’re giving consumers a chance to get to know you and decide whether they want to buy from you. They’re in control of their wallets, not you. Your job is to convince them your product or service is worthy of their pennies.

    3. Invest in your sales page

    Along with reminding us that selling isn’t sleazy, Kate went through her 17-step process to build a successful sales page.

    If you’re going to spend time and money on your website, focus on your sales page.

    From one page you can increase your SEO, overcome consumer objections, and increase conversions.

    And if you’re worried about putting in too much copy, don’t be. When a consumer is ready to buy, they’ll want all the information they can get. It’s okay to write long copy, but you need to do it extremely well. Don’t put words in just to fill the page. Make sure every sentence leads them towards clicking the ‘call to action’ button.

    Three points to remember when writing your sales page:

    1. Show them that you understand their problem and know how they feel
    2. Be honest, and address their concerns by explaining why your product or service is the best purchase even though it might be perfect
    3. Show them the features in terms of benefits. For example, this t-shirt goes with every outfit because we’ve chosen a style that works for day or night

    Working through your sales page may be time-consuming. But every tweak you make helps your prospect decide, ‘Yes, I do want to buy from you’.

    4. Consumers want more video

    That’s right, they want more content.

    Despite the internet being overloaded with videos, video strategist Ben Amos explained that consumers are on the hunt for more from brands they like.

    They want to get intimate with you and, videos help them do that. You might loathe getting in front of the camera to spout your wares, but it’s worth it.

    Why?

    Because video brings the human aspect to the online world.

    You’ve probably heard that we only learn around 3% of information from a person’s words. The rest is garnered from their tone of voice and body language.

    Being online takes away the chance for your customers to see you. Instead, they rely on your written content to decide whether they like you. But video is changing that. Once again, consumers get all the information they need by watching you talk about your business.

    It helps them feel closer to you and makes it easier for them to trust you. And building trust is vital to making customers feel comfortable with making a purchase.

    But don’t just whip out your phone and spend 30 seconds saying how great your product is. Plan what you’ll say first. It’s important to ask yourself, ‘What does my customer want to know about my business?’

    Once you’ve planned your content, it’s time to create it. Make sure you set up good lighting and choose a flattering angle.

    Of course, all this time is wasted if you forget to publish your video. Choose the platform where your customers hang out on most, or add it to your home page.

    5. Webinars done right, build trust

    We’ve all signed up to a webinar that promised amazing tools and tips to help us. We wasted an hour listening to the host yabber on about their wonderfulness. And in the end, they offered a discount for their best-selling product.

    Ugh, the frustration and disappointment.

    ‘Where were the tips? Why don’t I have any tools to help me?’

    You wonder why you bothered. And the next time a webinar invite hits your inbox, you send it to the trash.

    You think, ‘Why would I bother creating my own webinar?’
    Because as long as you make a promise and deliver on it, you’ll gain loyal fans.

    Omar Zenhom, co-founder and CEO of WebinarNinja and host of podcast The $100 MBA believes webinars build successful businesses.

    Here’s the key to making yours avoid the trash pile.

    The title of your webinar is your promise. If you call it ‘Seven ways to feel more confident in business’, you need to give your audience seven ways to feel confident.

    Not six. Not three. Seven.

    So brainstorm your content and search your wealth of knowledge for ideas you’re happy to share with your community.

    Ask yourself, ‘Are they relevant to my customer?’ If yes, that’s great. Go ahead and plan your webinar. Then review your plan and come up with a title that explains exactly what people should expect.

    Then it’ll be easy to promote because you’ll be confident about the benefit you’re offering.

    6. You need to get all touchy on your prospects

    No, it’s not about patting their bottom.

    Marketing expert James Tuckerman explained how we need to be engaging with people on numerous occasions.

    It takes between seven and fourteen points of contact with your business before prospects make a purchase. They check out your website, read your social posts, sign-up to your emails. And even then they won’t feel ready to buy.

    The trick is to be on their screen again and again without driving them mad.

    Ask yourself, ‘What experience does my customer have when they purchase from me?’ This helps you see the process through their eyes, from learning about your brand to buying from you.

    Review the buyer’s journey and find ways to connect with them at each point.

    7. Automation helps you get personal with your leads

    Digital marketing strategist Loren Bartley and Jeremiah O. Sarkett from Keap believe you need to create a personalised approach for managing your emails.

    Why?

    Because reaching out to your customers on a personal level draws them to you.

    Customers are selective. They only open an email if it has something they want to see.

    If they think you know who they are and what they like, they’ll trust you have something they’ll be interested in.

    By showing you care, you’ll increase your open rate.

    Most businesses don’t have a system for turning prospects into customers. We’re too busy juggling emails, phone calls, and post-it notes. And amongst all that mess, some leads slip away. We lose our hastily scribbled notes, forget to call someone back, or accidentally delete an email.

    To avoid people drifting over to your competitors, you need an automated process.

    Automating doesn’t mean losing connections with your customer. By having your workflow streamlined you create time to tailor your responses to each person.

    Scrabbling through the piles of paper on your desk is time consuming and tiring. When you avoid the chaos, you have more energy to give to your business. This energy goes towards caring more about who your customers are and what they want.

    Check out the online tools available and decide which works best for you.

    How you do it doesn’t matter. What does matter is capturing leads and guiding them from showing interest to making a purchase.

    Conclusion

    There you have it: seven great tips from the mouths of digital marketing experts.

    Posting videos, hosting webinars, rewarding your existing customers and personalising your emails are all ways to reach out and tap into your buyer’s heart.

    Want more nuggets to add to your marketing tools collection? Click Engage Convert tickets for 2020 are on sale now. Get in quick, because Melbourne doesn’t wait for anybody.

     

    About Kara Stokes

     

    Kara’s mission is to help you connect with your audience. It’s time to get your words working for you. Her specialty is content writing targeted straight for your ideal client’s heart. Whether your business is focused on fitness and health or you’re looking for a friendly copywriter, Kara can help.

     

     

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    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    An interview with Copywriter Denise Beecroft

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Denise Beecroft from Marketing Buzz

     

    Who are you Denise Beecroft?

    I have more than 25 years’ experience working in senior marketing roles and as a freelance copywriter and marketer. I’ve worked with million-dollar budgets and budgets that could be best described as working ’on the smell of an oily rag’.

    As a marketing consultant, social media manager and SEO copywriter, I’ve worked with small and medium-sized businesses in IT services, landscape architecture, manufacturing, engineering, building, physiotherapy, hearing care and acupuncture.

    I’ve also written fundraising campaigns and marketing plans for not-for-profits. My professional qualifications include a Masters of Commerce from UNSW and an ADMA Digital Marketing Certificate. Plus, I’ve done courses on copywriting, SEO copywriting, social media, editing, and profile writing. But it has to be said, that I’m still learning – and loving it!

     

    What did you do before you became a copywriter?

    My last real job was as a retail marketing manager at a national hearing care group. I’ve been working in marketing for ages.

     

    How long have you been copywriting?

    I’ve had my own business for about nine years now.

     

    What has been your biggest copywriting career win?

    It’s really been hitting an income level that I’m happy with. I love having a regular stable of clients I like, along with the occasional bigger one-off job to fill the coffers.

     

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    Deciding to work with a particular client I knew was going to be a pain. He was. I am getting better at saying no.

     

    What is your number one fave copywriting tools?

    The Hemingway app.

     

    How do you deal with self-doubt?

    Being part of TCCS has been great, as it’s clear many of us are in the same boat. As I say to my kids, “Just try your best”. So as long as I’m giving it a good go if things don’t work out I learn and move on.

     

    What work-life balance/mental health tips do you have?

    Make sure you program exercise into your week. I swim and go to a yoga class twice a week (each activity) and then fit in a few cups of tea with friends.

     

    What tip would you pass onto any newbie copywriters?

    Get a decent website. Follow the TCCS Facebook page. Do a copywriting/SEO course if it gives you confidence. Keep learning. Know there’s lots of work out there and sometimes when you’re starting out it takes a little time to build up.

     

     

    What’s next for you?

    I’m rolling along with my comfy part-time copywriting existence, especially while the kids are still at school. I want one more regular, medium-sized client who pays on time. But apart from that, I’m pretty happy.

     

    Why do you love TCCS?

    The generosity of the members who know and share pearls of wisdom every day. Kate is a powerhouse and a serious sharer. And Kate is supported by an amazing team behind the scenes.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    An interview with Copywriter Matt Fenwick

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Matt Fenwick from True North Content

     

    Who are you Matt Fenwick?

    I run True North Content, a content strategy and writing consultancy based in Canberra. We create content with value and help other people to do likewise. We love working on big and hairy content projects, such as rewriting the travel advisories for most of the countries in the world. I’m still surprised I get to do this for a living.

     

    What did you do before you became a copywriter?

    Lawyer, policy advisor, assistant janitor, contract cleaner, assistant chaplain, freelance journalist, research assistant, sketcher of blackboard illustrations for my Aunty’s school (she paid me $20).

     

    How long have you been copywriting?

    It’s kind of like the best friend that you end up dating then marrying. It’s hard to put an exact start date on it, but I’ve been getting paid for writing for 20 years and doing this full-time for seven.

     

    What has been your biggest copywriting career win?

    Sitting down at my desk when I’m in the pits of depression or anxiety and still doing good work.

     

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    The time I was working for a goat wholesale provider and wanted to talk about the degree of freedom accorded to the goat. I wrote “We put a lot of love into each goat”. That was a sign I was getting lazy. I should only write about things I give a shit about.

     

    What are your number one fave copywriting tools?

    Otter voice notes for capturing random brain farts.

     

    How do you deal with self-doubt?

    Ignore it. I’ve found the less I worry about what I think of myself the more confident I appear. I couldn’t be arsed doing affirmations or anything. I just try to be useful. I even did a TEDx talk about this:

     

    What work-life balance/mental health tips do you have?

    Everyone has a set number of hours a day of solid work in them. Find that number and stick to it. Don’t compare yourself to hyper-adrenalised go-getters who work 15 hours a day continuously. They are crumbling inside.

     

    What tip would you pass onto any newbie copywriters?

    Find people to team up with. Watch them. Build your confidence. Then do it yourself.

     

     

    What’s next for you?

    Deciding which form of carbs I’m going to order from Uber eats.

     

    Why do you love TCCS?

    Because you are my people. Because you gave me a place to vent and be weird and be loved.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop