How copywriters can manage a bad Facebook review (and win new fans in the process)

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Step by step ways to handle both real and fake negative reviews

    This post was written by TCCS member, Dayarne Smith

     

    For most copywriters it feels like a knife to the heart when a client leaves a bad Facebook review. We feel all the emotions, twice. How could they? What an arsehat. Am I a terrible writer?

    It’s hard not to take it personally, but the way you handle a crappy review makes all the difference. Don’t get emotional, respond professionally and if appropriate, try to make it up to them. If you get it right, you could actually make your clients love you more.

     

    Is it real, or fake?

    Truth is, most humans are quite self-centred.

    We want our needs met right now, and for goods and services to live up to our expectations. When that doesn’t happen, it’s way too easy to jump online and let the world know.

    Most negative feedback falls into two categories:

    1. It’s a fair complaint and you should deal with it (even if it’s petty)
    2. The review is fake – they’ve never been a client

     

    It’s a fair complaint, what should I do?

    Let’s say Susan gave you a blast on Facebook, claiming your customer service was terrible. She wanted a copywriting quote and contacted you through your website three times. Susan didn’t get a reply, so she left you a scathing review.

    What this could mean is your website contact form is broken and Susan’s done you a favour. How many other potential leads have you lost because you didn’t know the form wasn’t working?

     

    Here’s a simple 3-step solution

     

    1. Remove the emotion

    After you’ve finished swearing at your iPad – take a few deep breaths and calm down. Don’t respond while you’re upset or angry.

    Remove the emotion from the scenario and look at it objectively. Ask yourself – is the criticism fair?

    Could you have done more to prevent the problem? Is there room to improve your processes to make sure it doesn’t happen again. (Fix that broken contact form, dammit!)

     

    2. Respond publicly, discuss privately

    Once you’re calm, think about how you can resolve the problem. Don’t ignore the review. Respond with an apology if appropriate and ask them to contact you by direct message or email.

    By taking the conversation private, it’s easier for you to get the information you need. Often, people leave negative reviews because they want to be heard. Listen to their issue and try to understand it from their point of view.

    If the review is obscene or offensive, you should report it to Facebook through the ‘Find Support or Report Recommendation’ button.

     

    3. Schmooze a little

    Try to make things right. That might mean redoing some work, replacing a product, fixing a process, or sending a voucher or small gift.

    If you come to an amicable resolution, add a comment on the review explaining how you solved the problem.

    For example:
    “Hi Susan, thanks for giving us the opportunity to resolve the problem. We didn’t realise our website contact form was broken. We have fixed it and hope you’ll enjoy the little gift we’ve sent you in the mail.”

    * Note: Don’t do this if the customer is still angry – you risk them responding with another nasty comment. A tit-for-tat Facebook war never looks professional.

    Here’s the recap:

    • don’t ignore it
    • stay calm
    • respond publicly, deal with it privately
    • apologise if it’s warranted
    • make it up to them (if you can)

    And when all else fails …

    Move on.

    Even if you’re a true professional and do all the right things, sometimes people won’t be happy. Don’t sweat it.

    Make sure you’re in the habit of asking all your clients for reviews. At the end of every copywriting job send an email to the client with links to Facebook, Google, and other places you’d like them to leave you a review.

    This way, positive reviews will drown out the bad. Most people will use common sense to make a fair judgement that you if have 47 fab reviews and 2 negative ones, then you’re probably great at your job.

     

    What if the review is a big, dirty fake

    Couldn’t you scream with the unfairness of it? Fake reviews are the worst.

    Do you have a jealous competitor trying to get a leg up? Or someone who really doesn’t like you? No matter who the dirty culprit is, it’s a horrible experience.

    Here’s how to tackle the problem head on

     

    1. Don’t ignore it – call them out on their skullduggery

    Stay calm and professional, but make sure you respond. If you’re confident the reviewer has never been a client of yours, say so.

    Reply with something like:

    “Hello Kevin. I keep a comprehensive client database and have no record of ever working with you. Could you please contact me by email with more information so I can get to the bottom of this.”

     

    2. Report the comment to Facebook

    As soon as you post a reply, report the review through the ‘Find Support or Report Recommendation’ button. You can then choose a reason for reporting, including:

    • Unfair recommendation
    • Spam
    • Harassment
    • Recommendation not relevant
    • Violence

     

    3. Drown it out with positive reviews

    You should always seek reviews and testimonials from clients, but if it’s been a while, start now.

    Get in touch with as many clients as you can and ask them to leave you a Facebook review. Include a link to make it easier for them.

     

    You’ll come out the other side

    It mightn’t feel like it at the time, but you will come out the other side of a bad Facebook review. Your ego might be bruised, but it’ll blow over. And if you handle it well, you’ll win some new admirers who were impressed with the way you handled your business.

    Have you ever had to deal with a bad Facebook review? Do you have any helpful tips to add?

    About Dayarne Smith

    Dayarne Smith is a freelance copywriter helping businesses build brand awareness and win new customers. Dayarne knows boring copy doesn’t sell, so she crafts quality content with a fun, creative edge.

     

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    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

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    10 terrifying (but terrific) ways to market your copywriting business

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    How to win more clients in a competitive industry

     

    This post was written by TCCS member, Leanne Shelton

     

    Not everyone can write well. But these days, more and more business owners – large and small – recognise the importance of high-quality written communications.

    Whether it’s influential conversion copy, engaging websites, heartwarming scripts or captivating blogs, they need us to help them market their business.

    Yes, our copywriting skills and expertise are in high demand. But that doesn’t always translate to an inbox or voicemail full of enquiries.

    Because before we can help other businesses, we need to market our own.

    And that’s easier said than done.

    Especially when there are so many other talented copywriters out there.

    However, in my experience it all comes down to building connections.

    After all, you are your business.

    But I promise the effort will really pay off.

    To help you out, I want to share my 10 terrifying (but terrific) ways to market your copywriting business.

     

    1. In-person networking

    Networking.

    <SHUDDER>

    I’ve freaked you out already, haven’t I?

    But honestly, in-person networking has been one of the most effective marketing strategies for my business.

    By putting yourself out there and meeting new people, you’ll find endless opportunities to find collaboration partners, referrals, and clients.

     

    Tips

    I recommend looking into the various networking groups in your neighbourhood, such as:

    They all have different styles and structures, so visit a few (or ask others for feedback) and see which ones suit you best.

    • If you receive a list of attendees before the event, make a note of the people in your target market or niche. When you arrive, ask the event host (or someone who appears to know a lot of people) to introduce you.
    • Start a casual conversation by asking the other person about their recent wins or current challenges, or compliment them on what they’re wearing. (Everybody loves that.)

    Remember: Networking is NOT about the hard sell and throwing your business cards around. Don’t aim to score work from the event. Aim to make new connections instead. You never know where they will lead.

     

    2. Facebook Lives

    Ah yes, those scary Facebook Lives.

    What if I forget what to say?
    What if I look like a complete idiot?
    What if I have broccoli wedged in my teeth?

    Well, here’s the good news: if you stuff it up, you don’t have to save it.

    Editor’s note: Keep in mind that when you first start no one but your friends and family will be watching anyway. I’m not sure if that makes it more or less scary.

    Facebook Lives are great for building relationships with your audience.

    It’s your opportunity to show the real person behind the brand. And the less scripted it is, the better.

    After all, real-life conversations aren’t usually rehearsed.

     

    Tips

    Step 1 – Choose a topic that shows your expertise or highlights your opinion.
    Step 2 – Think of a few points to cover, but don’t overthink it.
    Step 3 – Decide on an attention-grabbing line that describes your topic
    Step 4 – Take a deep breath and go ‘Live’.

    You could go live on:

    • Your own business Facebook page
    • Within a Facebook group (with permission from the admin, of course)
    • Your <eek> general newsfeed

    Remember to keep it short and friendly. Going live will both build your personal brand and attract kudos from those too scared to do it themselves.

     

    3. LinkedIn videos

    If you’re not on LinkedIn, now’s the time to get on board. It’s not just a hub for job seekers anymore.

    Yes, I’m talking about videos again.

    But uploading a pre-recorded video to a platform where powerful and influential business people hang out can be even more excruciatingly biting-your-nails-off terrifying than Facebook Lives.

    Because unlike Facebook, your LinkedIn videos won’t be seen by just friends and family.

    They could also be seen by real-life money-paying potential clients.

    Which is precisely why you should do it.

     

    Tips

    While I suggest having a clear message in mind to avoid babbling, you still need to show the real you. Here are some great LinkedIn video tips from HubSpot.

     

    4. Cold pitching by phone

    Before email and SMS, business owners had to reach out to potential clients by – wait for it – calling them.

    Oh, the horror.

    These days, most of us feel snug and secure thanks to the email safety net. But if you want to make yourself stand out, pitching to clients by picking up the phone is the best way. It shows confidence in your abilities and is fantastic for building rapport.

     

    Tips

    • Check out their website and get an idea of what their business offers.
    • Don’t try to predict how the conversation will go. Just call and say you’re enquiring about the job posted on the TCCS job board or job request in the Facebook group and go from there.
    • Find opportunities to connect with the potential client, such as highlighting something you saw on their website or asking about their weekend.

    On multiple occasions, the person on the other end of the line has been surprised and impressed when I’ve called, and I’ve instantly won the job.

     

    5. Cold pitching by email

    Even if you choose to email, cold pitching in writing can still create a whole lotta pressure. After all, you’re a copywriter. So any spelling or grammatical mistakes won’t exactly leave a great impression.

    Ultimately, it’s a great opportunity to sell yourself in a non-salesy way.

     

    Tips

    • Remember to pitch according to the job request, but also add some personality.
    • Use conversational language.
    • Consider what experience and skills you bring to the table. Highlight why they simply must choose you for the task.

    Oh, and if you’re often victimised by autocorrect or spelling mishaps, it’s best to use a tool such as GradeProof or Grammarly before pressing ‘send’.

     

    6. Showing your face

    Selfies are no longer limited to obnoxious teenagers. These days, selfies can actually be beneficial to your business.

    Similar to videos, showing a selfie is your opportunity to display the face that’s usually trapped behind a computer screen. It also means giving your audience a snapshot into your world.

     

    Tips

    • Attending a conference? Take a photo in front of the massive signage as proof.
    • Having coffee with your favourite client? Just met an influential leader? Get a photo together and show how well connected you are.
    • Add some words around the scenario and ask a question to create engagement. And selfies usually attract very high engagement.

     

    7. Being a guest on a podcast

    Appearing as a guest on a podcast or local radio station allows you to present yourself as an industry expert. But it’s bloody scary.

    What if you don’t know the answer to a question?
    What if you start babbling?
    What if you feel like an absolute knob-head at the end of the interview?

     

    Tips

    • While it can be extremely nerve-wracking, the host will be eager to make you relaxed to produce the best possible interview for their show. So just follow their lead and be yourself. You’ve got this.
    • Share the podcast link across all your social channels and website once it goes live. You gotta make sure people hear it.

     

    8. Showing your true personality

    People buy from people they like and trust.

    But the reality is that not all business owners or marketing managers will connect with every copywriter. We’ve all got our quirks and skills that will appeal to some but repel others.

    The key is to be yourself so you attract the right people.

     

    Tips

    • Be consistent in your personal brand. (For example, I always wear something turquoise when I’m in a business setting.)
    • Use your normal conversational language when writing an email.
    • Don’t be afraid to express your true feelings in a Facebook Live or LinkedIn video.
    • Don’t switch to corporate speak or jargon when you pick up the phone.

    The right people will be eager to work with you

     

    9. Checking in with old clients

    Have you had a great working experience with a client but haven’t heard from them in months, or even years? It doesn’t need to be the end.

    While it’s good to keep in contact via a newsletter, sending a personalised email or making a friendly call to an old client to check in may be very well received.

    You might feel salesy and annoying. But they’ll probably see you as someone who actually cares about their business, rather than being just a one-night-stand.

     

    Tips

    • Casually start the conversation by asking how their business is going.
    • If you wrote their website copy, blogs, or landing page, you could ask about the views and click-throughs they’re getting.

    You never know. They might have a series of copywriting tasks on their to-do list and been meaning to get in touch. Or they may have ended up hiring an internal communications expert. But you’ll never know unless you ask, right?

     

    10. Speaking up (TOON TIP)

    Now that you’ve done all those Facebook Lives, Podcasts, and LinkedIn videos, you should feel more confident about your subject matter.

    It’s time to take it on the road, people.

    It’s time to clamber onto the stage, clutch that microphone with sweaty paws, and SPEAK.

    People often ask me how I get speaking gigs.

    The answer? I apply.

    You’d be surprised how few (decent) applications events get. You could be one of the lucky few. It’s an amazing way to build your expertise, authority and trust. And you get to connect with humans in a real and genuine way.

     

    Tips

    • Review previous speakers to ensure you’re pitching new content ideas.
    • Look through Facebook groups to ensure you’re picking a hot and relevant topic.
    • Prepare well. Rehearse your speech a few dozen times before you go on stage.
    • Keep it simple. Don’t fill your slides with thousands of bullet points.
    • Include a CTA. Give the audience a way to follow up with you.
    • Brand it, baby. Ensure your presentation branding is strong and encourages watchers to take photos and share on social media.

     

    Conclusion

    Yes, some of these marketing tips are super scary. But you don’t have to do them all at once. I suggest picking a couple and seeing how you go. Trust me, it will be worth the effort.

     

    Here’s a summary of the tips

    • Try a few networking groups to see which ones suit you best. Start a casual conversation by asking the other person about their recent wins or current challenges, or compliment them on what they’re wearing.
    • When doing a Facebook Live, remember to keep it short and friendly.
    • When doing a LinkedIn video, have a clear message in mind to avoid babbling. But still show the real you.
    • If you’re doing a cold call, find opportunities to connect with the potential client such as highlighting something you saw on their website or asking about their weekend.
    • For cold emails, consider what experience and skills you bring to the table. Highlight why they simply must choose you for the task.
    • Attending a conference? Take a selfie in front of the massive signage as proof.
    • If you’re a guest on radio or a podcast, follow the host’s lead and be yourself.
    • Be consistent in your personal brand.
    • When checking in with old clients, show an interest in their business by asking how it’s tracking.
    • When pitching to present at an event, look through Facebook groups to ensure you’re picking a hot and relevant topic.

     

    Over to you

    Feeling inspired to take action? I hope so. If you have any wins from trying any of these 10 tips, please share them below.

     

    About Leanne Shelton

    Leanne is a freelance copywriter and content marketing trainer in Sydney. As a mum of two young girls, she enjoys attending evening networking events to escape the bedtime routine and listening to inspiring podcasts. Otherwise, you’ll find her curled up on the couch with a tea and gluten- and dairy-free chocolate biscuit.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    A beginner’s guide to writing TV commercials

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Mark Farrelly

     

    As a copywriter, the first thing to know about writing for TV is it’s a lot different to writing for print or the web. (Or even what you’d write for radio.)

    It’s an audio-visual medium, and so what’s seen is often more important than what’s said.

    And being a broadcast medium, once a TV commercial is aired it’s gone, leaving behind only a residual impression of what it was all about. You can’t watch it again*, or keep it handy so you to refer to it later.

    With the written word, you usually have enough time and enough words to construct an entire story about a product or service. And in doing so you can make a number of points or build an argument.

    But with TV, particularly if you’re writing a 30-second commercial, you can really only have one key message.

    In fact, TV commercials work best when you only try to get one message across. Why? Because when the ad is finished, there’s a good chance people will remember that one message. However if you expect them to remember five things, or even three, you’re going to be disappointed.

     

    The beginning is a very good place to start

     

    When writing a TV commercial, start by helping the client establish the one core message they want people to know. It might be that they’ve:

    • opened a new business or branch
    • launched a new product
    • put on a sale
    • got a special offer for the coming month.

    Whatever it is, try to get them to agree that you’ll only be talking about one thing. This is WHAT you’re going to say and working that out might take 50% of your time. (Pressuring a client to only say one thing instead of five things can be tough. But it will be worth it.)

    Now that you’ve worked out WHAT you’re going to say, the next step is to work out HOW you’re going to say it. Remember, TV is a visual medium. So if you can SHOW something rather than TALK about it you’ll be better off.

    Don’t think of TV as a PowerPoint presentation. While you can put the same words on the screen that are being spoken quite cheaply, it’s not effective advertising unless you’re Harvey Norman. (Or doing other aggressive retail ads.)

    It’s far more effective to demonstrate what your product can do.

    But before you start writing write any words, your ad needs an idea (or ‘concept’).

     

    Common types of TV ads

     

    While every commercial may seem different, they nearly always fall into one category or another. Here are some of the most common ones.

    SLICE OF LIFE – Actors playing out real-life situations, either using the product or talking about using it. (Sadly, the dialogue is often corny. “Oh, Jen. I see you’re using new Bloggo. Tell me why you love it so much.”)

    PRODUCT USE (with voiceover) – Visuals of the product being used (car being driven, holiday being enjoyed, meal being cooked, etc.) But instead of the actors speaking to the camera as they do in the ‘slice of life’ commercials, you hear a spoken voice along with jingle or whatever.

    PRESENTER – Someone (usually attractive) making a sales pitch to the camera. (It may also be a celebrity who uses their fame to ‘endorse’ the product.)

    DEMONSTRATION – Showing what the product can do with a simple, clever or dramatic demonstration. (Laundry products do this all the time to show how their “cleans much better”.)

    SLIDESHOW – Graphics, static images, and words on the screen, with the voiceover basically repeating what you’re seeing. (Think Harvey Norman).

    LOCATION – If your product is a particular location (e.g store, restaurant, theme park, etc.) there’s nothing like being there to see it all.

    STOLEN IDEA – Grabbing footage of something from YouTube, a set of photos or something else that already exists and putting a twist on it. (You’ll need the rights of course.)

     

    Maybe serve it with a twist

     

    Now that you’ve chosen your concept, how about putting a bit of a twist on it to make it fresh and more watchable?

    Could the ‘slice of life’ people all be speaking a different language? Could the roles be reversed – kids dressed as parents, husband dressed as wife, boss dressed as worker – and vice versa?

    Is the presenter upside down? Are they in a wetsuit underwater? Are they standing in a hurricane?

    Is your product demonstration memorable? Years ago someone advertised bulletproof glass by having the presenter speaking behind the glass as someone fired a bullet at them to prove the product worked.

    Now that’s a powerful product demonstration.

     

    Finally, words on paper (or screen)

     

    Now that you’ve chosen your concept, how do you write an actual TV script?

    The simplest way to do it is like the one shown here. The left side describes the vision, and the right side describes the audio. It’s simple, and the best way for your mind to imagine what you’re seeing and hearing at any given time. (You can find templates online).

    You use the vision column to describe what the audience sees, including whether it’s a closeup or a wide shot, how you’re switching to the next scene (cut, slow dissolve, etc.) or whatever. You also include any on-screen graphics as ‘supers’ (images superimposed over the screen).

    On the audio side you write what the voiceover (‘VO’ or ‘Announcer’) or actor (‘100%’) is saying and whether they’re male or female, as well as any sound effects (‘SFX’) or music.

    You work out your timing for the whole script by putting a stopwatch on how long it takes to read the right column OUT LOUD with natural pauses and breaks.

    A tip for presenting TV commercials to clients: Read the script out loud to them. Don’t let them read it because they’ll treat it as written copy and correct your commas. (No one will see the commas. They’ll only hear them as pauses.)

     

    Timing is everything.

     

    It’s critically important to get the word count in your ad right. Most people overwrite. All TV commercials need half a second of silence at the beginning so they don’t come over the top of the previous ad. So, for a 30-second commercial you have 29.5 seconds of audio. That’s about 75 words maximum. Best to go for fewer if you can.

    Don’t rush the audio. Give yourself time. If it’s dialogue (two people speaking to each other), you need more time for the natural gaps and pauses in conversation. So you have even fewer words to play with.

    Ideally you should mention the name of your client or product at least two or three times in a TV commercial, particularly if its new, unknown or never been on TV before. You may also need an important call to action such as “Sale ends Sunday” or “Limited stock, so buy now”. That alone could take up 10-15 seconds of your ad, leaving very little time to get your core message across. Which is why you’ll be able to communicate only one key message.

    Now you have to decide whether people will be talking over the pictures (‘voiceover’ or ‘announcer’) or whether they’re saying stuff as you film them like actors in a movie (‘100%’).

     

    Camera tricks.

     

    The great thing about TV is you can not only reveal things with a camera, you can also mask them. So you can start the ad with people thinking it’s about one thing, then pull out to reveal the presenter is actually standing on top of an elephant or a car, or in a toilet. You can also tilt or pan to show the person they’ve been talking to the entire commercial isn’t who you thought it was.

    You can also do simple special effects. Make people magically appear or disappear. Move through time. Do before and after examples. Speed up time or slow it down.

    Your idea could be based on any of these.

     

    Beware the overlords of CAD

     

    Unlike the unregulated world of the internet, every TV commercial has to be reviewed and approved by a body called the Commercials Acceptance Division (CAD) before going to air. You send them a copy of the ad, they put it through a bunch of rules, and if it passes they give it a CAD number.

    And your ad can’t be aired without one.

    If you have any doubts or you’re a newbie, you can send your script to CAD first to get a pre-ruling. They’ll tell you whether it will be approved, or what changes you’ll need to make to get it approved.

    So there you have it. The first steps in what will hopefully be an exciting time for you: writing your first TV commercial.

    I can’t wait to see it.

    * Ok, so you can actually watch them over and over again if you want.  But few people do. And anyway, that’s not the point.

     

    About Mark Farrelly

    Mark Farrelly is a highly skilled radio and video/TV copywriter. He has extensive career experience working with almost every type of client, in almost every type of industry, with almost every type of product or service. Mark pride’s himself on getting to know your business and market intimately so he can create relevant work that draws on fundamental truths hidden in your product, business or market.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    What to do when copywriting work goes quiet.

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Kate Merryweather

     

    Quiet times happen to us all. As a copywriter with seven years of experience, I recently found myself in a quiet stage. What did I do? Got busy.

    Here’s 19 productive steps you can take to get ahead, improve your processes and find new clients when copywriting work goes quiet.

    From upping your network game to preparing content in advance to stalking leads on LinkedIn, there’s plenty of work to be done that will pay off down the line. Your future self will thank you.

     

    1. Panic. Seriously, if work is getting quiet, now is a perfectly good time to panic.

    It’s your livelihood. When you have bills and mortgages to pay, it can be incredibly stressful to lose income. So, don’t listen to anyone who says not to panic. That’s nuts. Panic as much as you want. Then move on to the rest of the items on this list.

     

     

    2. Watch the TCCS (and other) job boards like a mofo.

    Don’t email responses. Give the leads a call. First in gets the curly fries.

     

    3. Audit your website.

    Freshen up outdated pages, optimise your images, ensure it’s responsive and mobile friendly. Does your website looks like it belongs in 2019 or 2012? For the love of pancakes, get rid of any sliders on your website. Plus, banish any images of fingers tapping on keyboards. (Could it *be* any more cliché?)

     

     

    4. Gather case studies.

    Publish them on your website so your portfolio is looking smick.

     

    5. Consider your niche.

    By specialising in an area, you can establish a reputation for being the go-to expert copywriter in real estate, finance, beauty or lifestyle brands.

     

    6. Brush up on your LinkedIn game.

    Request connections from potential clients in your niche, and post content on how you can solve their problems. Refine your bio, ask for referrals and leave thoughtful comments (Gary Vee says 90 comments per day but he’s nuts.) Publish interesting posts, showing off your pithy writing skills in the process. Instead of posting links to your blog, write native LinkedIn articles and watch your visibility soar. Do Kate’s LinkedIn course.

     

    7. Take a deep dive into your SEO and find out which pages are ranking best.

    Do one of The Recipe for SEO Success courses to jump a few notches on the Google search rankings.

     

    8. Sort out your Google My Business page.

    Write posts, add images and invite customers to give you reviews. I find humorous I’m-not-begging-but-I-am-begging requests work.

     

    9. Write blogs in advance.

    When you’re busy down the track, you’ll have pre-written blog posts prepared and ready to publish.

     

     

    10. Unless you are starving, don’t reduce your prices to be more competitive.

    On the contrary. Review your prices by doing the Toon pricing course.

     

    11. Update your timesheeting process.

    Watching the clock is the only way to see exactly how long jobs take you and which are most profitable.

     

    12. Guest blog. Pitch guest articles for high domain authority websites.

    You will raise your profile and you may get a juicy backlink which helps your SEO.

     

    13. Increase your network.

    Your clients may need suppliers like developers, photographers, videographers, graphic designers and social media managers. You can helpfully refer your clients to your network of experts (and they can refer to you too = $ker-ching$).

     

    14. Review your workflow.

    How can you automate oft-repeated processes? Write a sequence of emails as templates for each step in your copywriting process. Check out workflow and project management tools like Asana, Basecamp or Dubsado so your client experience is ultra profesh.

     

    15. Polish up your proposals.

    Ditch your dorky Microsoft Word proposal and create something snazzy on Canva

     

     

    16. Network.

    Kick off your moccasins, pluck your monobrow and enter the world of face-to-face networking. Wear your TCCS ‘copy beast’ badge as a conversation starter.

     

    17. Tell people you are available.

    A regular client of mine was surprised when I told her things were quiet. She hadn’t been giving me briefs because she thought I was busy. So, when copywriting work goes quiet, get in touch with previous clients and let them know you’re available.

     

    18. Subcontract to other TCCS members.

    There are plenty of opportunities for subcontracting to senior copywriters. Put your hand up.

     

    19. Update your email signature.

    You can do cool things like beg for ask for reviews, share your availability over coming weeks or link to your newsletter.

     

    Guess what?

    I’ve been following the items on this list and I’ve booked in two juicy projects. So it works.

     

    But also?

    My slump coincided with school holidays, so I’ve been playing Footy Feud, learning to floss, watching Disney movies and making apple cakes in my Thermomix. So it’s cool to take a break from freelancing. My list is here when you need it.

     

     

    About Kate Merryweather

    Kate is a freelance copywriter and mum of three who annoys people by talking about her Thermomix. She specialises in copywriting for digital marketing agencies and likes borrowing books from the library she will never read.

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    How to find copywriting clients

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Nadine Crowe

     

    Top 10 tips for finding freelance copywriting jobs

    1. Tap your personal networks
    2. Leverage your professional networks
    3. Talk to people about what you do
    4. Connect with connectors
    5. Partner with related industries
    6. Believe in what you have to give
    7. Practice warm outreach
    8. Go where your clients are
    9. Be professional
    10. Join a good copywriting community

    Whether you’re new to copywriting or a seasoned professional, it’s likely you’ll find yourself looking for more clients at one stage or another. Check out these top 10 tips for finding copywriting clients.

     

    1. Tap your personal networks

    Don’t be shy. Use your social pages to let people know what you are doing, and be clear that referrals and recommendations do help. And don’t underestimate the potential of corporate friends and family. They work in businesses that often need freelance copywriters but often don’t know where to find them or who they can trust. Make sure your contacts know what you do. You never know when they or someone in their network might need a copywriter.

     

    2. Leverage your professional networks

    In the words of a wise copywriter at the recent CopyCon19 copywriting conference, “LinkedIn is where clients with money hang out” [Kate Toon]. People on LinkedIn are actively looking for business opportunities. Make use of your professional connections. And if you aren’t sure how to create your profile, or haven’t optimised it for your copywriting services, check out Kate Toon’s LinkedIn Booster Course (free for members).

     

    3. Talk to people about what you do

    Chat to people about what you do. The easiest way to start is to simply ask others what they do and then listen. More often than not they’ll reciprocate and ask what you do. It’s not the time for a sale’s pitch, but letting people you meet know what you do and chatting about it can lead to potential opportunities.

     

    4. Connect with connectors

    Sometimes all it takes is an introduction. Even better than talking to people about what you do is to talk specifically with people who are connectors. It could be a friend who seems to move effortlessly between multiple social groups, or your hairdresser whose day cuts across the full spectrum of society. These people could provide you with just the connection you need. So don’t miss an opportunity to chat with them about what you have going on.

     

    5. Partner with related industries

    Contact businesses in related industries with a similar audience to yours, and see if they’d be interested in teaming up. Designers, developers and SEO experts are perfect for partnering up with as they often need copywriters for large and ongoing projects. And don’t forget creative agencies that need to bring in additional copywriters for big projects without having to employ them on an ongoing basis.

     

    6. Believe in what you have to give

    This isn’t to make you feel better about yourself, or to give you the confidence to put yourself out there. Genuine confidence is so damn magnetic in the same way insecurity repels. Clients are drawn to you when you have a genuine belief in yourself and what you offer. And it reveals itself in so many ways – from your tone of voice, the interplay of conversation and the way you listen, even what you do with your hands. Know the value you bring and be clear on what your copy can deliver.

     

    7. Practice warm outreach

    Hate the thought of cold outreach? Then change the way you think about it. Warm outreach is all about building relationships rather than selling anything. Instead of emailing people to sell them something, contact them just to make a connection. Let them know you’re available to help in the future should they need it, but don’t expect anything from them. Set the tone, and it changes how others respond. Circle back after a set amount of time to see if there’s anything they need. Make your goal to hit your target of warm outreaches instead of sales outcomes, and you may well get the outcome you were hoping for.

     

    8. Go where your clients are

    Attend conferences and events where you know your customers will be. Share your knowledge. If you’re brave enough, get up on stage and speak. Let people see the value you bring. Join Facebook groups where you know your clients hang out. Even if you haven’t chosen a niche, choose a topic you enjoy or have an interest in so you know which businesses or groups to approach. The more specific you get in identifying your ideal clients, the easier it is to know who to approach. And this doesn’t lock you into a niche, it’s simply a means to get started. Visit local businesses and let them know what you do and how you can help.

     

    9. Be professional

    A lack of professionalism can be the Achilles heel of many a copywriter. So much time and effort goes into finding the client, only to stumble at the final hurdle because the client senses something’s not quite right. There are lots of ways clients gauge whether you are the real deal and someone they can trust. Demonstrate professionalism by having contracts in place. Know the going rate for copywriters and complete your own rate card so you’re never caught off guard. Present your work in a properly formatted Copy Deck. Pick up the Copywriter Ultimate Pack from the Clever Copywriting School and have all the templates and contracts you need for that professional touch. Get professional photos taken and logos designed, and have your business cards ready to go

     

    10. Join a good copywriting community

    Of all the things you can do to find new copywriting clients, joining a good copywriting group is the piece de resistance. Not only do copywriters share opportunities and refer jobs to one another, they’re also a huge source of encouragement, advice and support. In The Clever Copywriting School (TCCS), annual members can also create their own directory listing where prospective clients look for potential copywriters. Even more exciting, TCCS now has a job board where clients list copywriting jobs only members can apply for. And to top it off, TCCS members get a 20% discount on all templates and courses available in The Copy Shop.

     

    Conclusion

    There’s so much you can do without paying a cent to land more clients. But they involve significant action and a certain level of mental resolve. If you feel like you could use more support, and you can make the investment, TCCS membership might be just what you need. TCCS membership gets you access to the best copywriting job board down under, one of the most encouraging and supportive copywriting communities around, and a 20% discount on all Copy Shop templates, contracts, and courses. It’s a great way to fast track your copywriting career.

     

    Over to you

    Which one of these top 10 tips for finding copywriting clients will you try?
    If you liked this article, please share it.

     

    About Nadine Crowe

    Nadine Crowe is a Melbourne copywriter and SEO consultant obsessed with good coffee and salted caramel ice cream.

     

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    CopyCon19: The Official Review

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    How attending CopyCon19 improved my self-esteem and my business ?

     

    Hello. My name is Sue-Ellen, and I’m a copywriter.

    I’m also an introvert (*reaches for a paper bag*), not a fan of conferences and all those people (*opens the paper bag*) and currently suffering from almost paralysing imposter syndrome (*starts huffing into the paper bag*).

    So WTF was I doing booking a ticket to CopyCon19? Like, seriously. What the actual…

    But encouraged by those who have attended previous CopyCons (Australia’s only conference for copywriters), I found myself booking my ticket and winging my way to Melbourne.

    So did the promise of great learnings, support, fun, friendship, an endless supply of good coffee and, most importantly, a dedicated ‘Don’t talk to me’ zone come to fruition?

    You bet your arse it did. So much so that I was waving my credit card in the air, ready to book #CopyCon20, before the day was out.

    Want to know why?

    Then keep reading as I take you through my day at CopyCon19.[1]


     

    Conference Opening with Kate Toon (as introduced by Jenny De Lacy)

     

     

    The conference Mistress of Ceremonies was Melbourne’s own Jenny De Lacy, the Coachest with the Mostest[2]. She not only kept things moving along with almost military precision but also made us laugh, let us know when we could grab more coffee, and threw the occasional t-shirt at someone’s head.

    As Jenny introduced our own Dear Leader Kate Toon, internationally renowned SEO Goddess, creator of our beloved The Clever Copywriting School (TCCS) Community and misfit Pommie who now calls Australia home, to officially open the conference, a hush fell over the room.

    We watched in silent awe as she made her way across the stage, a choir of angels singing sweetly with her every step.

    Ha! As if.

    Kate took to the stage amid cheers, whoops and applause, and worked the room like a rock star. And I’m talking old-school rock star here. Jagger. Mercury. Williams. Toon.

    It works. What can I say?

     


     

    Robert Gerrish – I’m rubbish, but don’t tell anyone

     

     

    Robert, creator of the Flying Solo community and author of the small business bible The 1-minute Commute, wanted to chat about the dreaded imposter syndrome.

    I was all eyes, ears and pen at the ready. I was ready to banish this demon beast.

    Robert challenged us to look at ourselves honestly, identify what was holding us back, acknowledge it, and then get over it.

    Okay, so it was a bit more involved than that. But basically, that’s what he did.

    He also signed copies of his latest book and took photos with his adoring fans at morning tea. He ran out of books. He didn’t seem bothered. 😉

     


     

    Suzanne Chadwick – Building an unbeatable brand for you and your client

     

     

    Suzanne wandered onto the stage wearing a headdress that would make drag queens drool! She’s vibrant, colourful and great fun.

    She also knows her shit.

    A renowned brand consultant, Suzanne was tasked with helping a bunch of (mostly) freelance copywriters build their own brand. It’s something we all know we have to do, but many of us don’t have the vaguest idea where to start.

    She showed us how we’re slowly moving into a new revolution—the Revolution of the Heart—and how we as copywriters are in the prime position to drive it forward and help people make the connections they so desperately want.

    Yep, Suzanne sorted us out.

    Okay, so she made us understand where to start. Baby steps.

    If we build it, they will come.

     


     

    Ryan Wallman – Making taglines work

     

     

    Ryan, an acclaimed copywriter, is all about the tags.

    People think it’s easy to create good taglines. After all, it’s only a couple of words, right?

    Yeah, nah.

    As any good copywriter knows, a memorable tagline is worth its weight in gold. And Ryan was here to break it down and help us all create that marketing gold.

    All in just 4 words.[3]


     

    Sophia Arthur – Money talks: How I charge more and stress less

     

     

    Sophia was the first member of The Clever Copywriting School Community (TCCS) community to take the stage for CopyCon19.

    A successful health and wellness copywriter, Sophia was here to talk money.

    Specifically, how to stop doing this and start doing that so you can find your perfect clients who will be happy to pay your invoices. And pay them on time.

    Because you’re worth it.

     


     

    Aaron Agius – The secrets to advanced content marketing and SEO

     

     

    The first thing Aaron, marketing/SEO expert and co-founder of Louder.Online, did when he hit the stage was to have us all play a game online.

    But this was no Candy Crush Saga.

    This game was to help us understand the Google Gods and how to choose the perfect sacrifices to appease, rather than flinging any old thing onto the altar.

    Did you know 90% of online content gets no traffic from Google?

    No that’s not a typo. Ninety percent is correct.

    Scary, huh?

    If you want to change all that, you can find some excellent SEO copywriters here.

     


     

    Kate Toon – Keynote: Surviving the copywriting client dating game

     

     

    As the conference keynote speaker, Kate was all about building long-term, loving relationships with our clients.

    Or not.

    Being a modern woman with modern sensibilities, Kate understands that sometimes both copywriter and client just want a quickie in the corner.

    Not all relationships are created equal. And that’s perfectly okay.

    Kate talked us through those first tentative but exciting emails and calls. She gave us the codes for the appropriate mood lighting as we delved into the nitty gritty of copywriting and started to really talk dirty.

    She made us feel good about wanting to stay and build something special, or to walk away with that secret smile of a job well done.

    She even hugged us as we spoke about breaking up, and how it is hard to do.

    Whether we wanted to swipe right, swipe left, or go out for cocktails, Kate made us feel great about our choices.

     


     

    Bernadette Schwerdt – 7 secrets to writing copy that gets results every time

     

     

    I have a special place in my heart for Bernadette—author, speaker, consultant and teacher.

    She taught the very first copywriting course I did with the Australian Writers’ Centre. She was the first person who looked at my work and said it was good. That I was good.

    She made me feel like I could be a copywriter.

    So I was thrilled she was part of this conference. And the secrets, formulas, tricks and tips she showed me back then that I still use (very successfully) now are exactly what she presented to this gathering of my colleagues and peers.

     


     

    Amanda Vanelderen – How (and why) to take the perfect brief

     

     

    Amanda, copywriter and author of the best little writing help book in the world, Write Better (How to cut the crap and say what you mean), was the second member of The Clever Copywriting School Community to take to the stage.

    And she was here to tell us why we were all doing it wrong. Taking the client brief, that is.

    I know I’m guilty of not giving the brief, possibly the most useful document in the entire project, the attention it deserves.

    Like a new lover, we need to nurture and tease out all its secrets so when it comes time to strip off, everyone loves what they see.

    Oh yeah.

     


     

    Liz Green – How to win more jobs with a wrinkly face

     

     

    Liz, who moonlights as a full-time housesitter when she’s not writing, was the next TCCS member to speak. Liz found herself copywriting a little later in life, and was keen to share her story to encourage others to take the leap and follow their dreams.

    Liz was not an eager-eyed 22-year-old ‘gun’ when she took the plunge into copywritinghood[4]. No, she came to it in a rather roundabout way.

    Just like I did.

    Personally, I found Liz’s talk one of the most compelling of the conference because her story mirrors mine. And I love hearing people’s stories.

     


     

    David Bell – Creative director Q&A: design, agency work, ideation and more

     

     

    David sat down with Kate and talked all things agencies—from how, to why, to where, to whom. Everything was open for discussion.

    It was interesting to hear someone from agency land talk about creating and copywriting. As a freelancer, working in an agency is like another world. For some, it’s a nightmare. For others, it’s just a dream.

    But from what I see, hear and read, a lot of freelancers sit somewhere in between—happy to work for and with agencies as the need or work arises, but for the most part still wanting the freedom and autonomy freelancing provides.

     


     

    Donna Webeck, Nerissa Bentley and Rachel Alt – How niching made me a more successful copywriter

     

     

    To niche or not to nice. That is the question. And it’s a question many freelancer copywriters ask themselves at some stage in their career.

    So who better to ask than a panel of three TCCS members who have very successfully niched into three different areas.

    Donna is a real estate and property expert who gets to wander through million-dollar properties for a living.

    Nerissa is a health and wellness specialist who knows how to turn all the medical gobbledygook into interesting and relatable copy.

    And last, but certainly not least, Rachel is the absolute authority on turning even the most boring finance and insurance copy into words people want to read.

    These three ladies showed us how niching into an area you want to write about can be the best thing you can do for your business. Sure, it can be scary. But if it’s what you love, then why not become an expert and offer your clients the very best money can buy?

     


     

    Rob Marsh – Keynote: sales pages: why how Americans do them better

     

     

    Rob, our token Yank for the day, was here to show us the mysterious ways of the American copywriter.

    Anyone who has wandered into a group of American copywriters and watched for a few hours will understand there’s a world of difference between American and Australian copywriters. It can be very confronting.

    But why?

    Well, that’s what Rob was here to show us—how to bring the best of the American style of copywriting and merge it with our own.

    ~~~~~~~

    And that was it for our amazing speakers.

    The day wrapped up with the presentation of the TCCS Member of the Year—a highly sought after award voted for by members of the TCCS community.

    Our health and wellness guru Nerissa was crowned Queen for a year, and certainly rocks a tiara. (Move over Meaghan.)

    The day then moved into a fabulous Star Wars-themed party and… well, what happens at CopyCon stays at CopyCon. 😉

    To know all our secrets, you‘ll just have to come to the next one and see for yourself.

    If you are thinking about attending the next one, just do it[5]. You’ll not only help yourself and your own business, but also open yourself up to a wonderfully supportive community who are here to guide, help and cheer you every step of the way.

    And it is marvellous in our eyes[6].

     


     

    1 There was a Day 2: Mastermind but tickets were sold out before I booked. Booooo.
    2 You can have that one, Jenny. I know it’s too fabulous for words. Ha ha.
    3 Just to clarify, Ryan said more than four words. Heaps more. He just taught us how to create four-word taglines.
    4 If Shakespeare can make up words, then so can I.
    5 Ha! Come find me. Nike. (*Rolls eyes*)
    6 As a movie critic, I frequently quote great women from great movies. Bonus points if you can pick this one.

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