How to find copywriting clients

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Nadine Crowe

     

    Top 10 tips for finding freelance copywriting jobs

    1. Tap your personal networks
    2. Leverage your professional networks
    3. Talk to people about what you do
    4. Connect with connectors
    5. Partner with related industries
    6. Believe in what you have to give
    7. Practice warm outreach
    8. Go where your clients are
    9. Be professional
    10. Join a good copywriting community

    Whether you’re new to copywriting or a seasoned professional, it’s likely you’ll find yourself looking for more clients at one stage or another. Check out these top 10 tips for finding copywriting clients.

     

    1. Tap your personal networks

    Don’t be shy. Use your social pages to let people know what you are doing, and be clear that referrals and recommendations do help. And don’t underestimate the potential of corporate friends and family. They work in businesses that often need freelance copywriters but often don’t know where to find them or who they can trust. Make sure your contacts know what you do. You never know when they or someone in their network might need a copywriter.

     

    2. Leverage your professional networks

    In the words of a wise copywriter at the recent CopyCon19 copywriting conference, “LinkedIn is where clients with money hang out” [Kate Toon]. People on LinkedIn are actively looking for business opportunities. Make use of your professional connections. And if you aren’t sure how to create your profile, or haven’t optimised it for your copywriting services, check out Kate Toon’s LinkedIn Booster Course (free for members).

     

    3. Talk to people about what you do

    Chat to people about what you do. The easiest way to start is to simply ask others what they do and then listen. More often than not they’ll reciprocate and ask what you do. It’s not the time for a sale’s pitch, but letting people you meet know what you do and chatting about it can lead to potential opportunities.

     

    4. Connect with connectors

    Sometimes all it takes is an introduction. Even better than talking to people about what you do is to talk specifically with people who are connectors. It could be a friend who seems to move effortlessly between multiple social groups, or your hairdresser whose day cuts across the full spectrum of society. These people could provide you with just the connection you need. So don’t miss an opportunity to chat with them about what you have going on.

     

    5. Partner with related industries

    Contact businesses in related industries with a similar audience to yours, and see if they’d be interested in teaming up. Designers, developers and SEO experts are perfect for partnering up with as they often need copywriters for large and ongoing projects. And don’t forget creative agencies that need to bring in additional copywriters for big projects without having to employ them on an ongoing basis.

     

    6. Believe in what you have to give

    This isn’t to make you feel better about yourself, or to give you the confidence to put yourself out there. Genuine confidence is so damn magnetic in the same way insecurity repels. Clients are drawn to you when you have a genuine belief in yourself and what you offer. And it reveals itself in so many ways – from your tone of voice, the interplay of conversation and the way you listen, even what you do with your hands. Know the value you bring and be clear on what your copy can deliver.

     

    7. Practice warm outreach

    Hate the thought of cold outreach? Then change the way you think about it. Warm outreach is all about building relationships rather than selling anything. Instead of emailing people to sell them something, contact them just to make a connection. Let them know you’re available to help in the future should they need it, but don’t expect anything from them. Set the tone, and it changes how others respond. Circle back after a set amount of time to see if there’s anything they need. Make your goal to hit your target of warm outreaches instead of sales outcomes, and you may well get the outcome you were hoping for.

     

    8. Go where your clients are

    Attend conferences and events where you know your customers will be. Share your knowledge. If you’re brave enough, get up on stage and speak. Let people see the value you bring. Join Facebook groups where you know your clients hang out. Even if you haven’t chosen a niche, choose a topic you enjoy or have an interest in so you know which businesses or groups to approach. The more specific you get in identifying your ideal clients, the easier it is to know who to approach. And this doesn’t lock you into a niche, it’s simply a means to get started. Visit local businesses and let them know what you do and how you can help.

     

    9. Be professional

    A lack of professionalism can be the Achilles heel of many a copywriter. So much time and effort goes into finding the client, only to stumble at the final hurdle because the client senses something’s not quite right. There are lots of ways clients gauge whether you are the real deal and someone they can trust. Demonstrate professionalism by having contracts in place. Know the going rate for copywriters and complete your own rate card so you’re never caught off guard. Present your work in a properly formatted Copy Deck. Pick up the Copywriter Ultimate Pack from the Clever Copywriting School and have all the templates and contracts you need for that professional touch. Get professional photos taken and logos designed, and have your business cards ready to go

     

    10. Join a good copywriting community

    Of all the things you can do to find new copywriting clients, joining a good copywriting group is the piece de resistance. Not only do copywriters share opportunities and refer jobs to one another, they’re also a huge source of encouragement, advice and support. In The Clever Copywriting School (TCCS), annual members can also create their own directory listing where prospective clients look for potential copywriters. Even more exciting, TCCS now has a job board where clients list copywriting jobs only members can apply for. And to top it off, TCCS members get a 20% discount on all templates and courses available in The Copy Shop.

     

    Conclusion

    There’s so much you can do without paying a cent to land more clients. But they involve significant action and a certain level of mental resolve. If you feel like you could use more support, and you can make the investment, TCCS membership might be just what you need. TCCS membership gets you access to the best copywriting job board down under, one of the most encouraging and supportive copywriting communities around, and a 20% discount on all Copy Shop templates, contracts, and courses. It’s a great way to fast track your copywriting career.

     

    Over to you

    Which one of these top 10 tips for finding copywriting clients will you try?
    If you liked this article, please share it.

     

    About Nadine

    Nadine Crowe is a Melbourne copywriter and SEO consultant obsessed with good coffee and salted caramel ice cream.

     

     

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    Best podcasts for copywriters: so you can learn ALL the things

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Angela Rodgers

     

    Podcasts to help you learn about copywriting even when you’re not at your desk

    Are you a copywriter who wants to learn stuff, get better at your craft or just be a better business owner? Then podcasts are where it’s at.

    If you’re like me and don’t have a lot of uninterrupted time to read all the books, then podcasts are the next best thing. Maybe even better.

    Either way, some of the best tips I ever got for my business were learned while settling or feeding my babies late at night, with one ear glued to a podcast.

    Did I mention they’re also free? Yep.

    I’ve subscribed (and unsubscribed) to a ridiculous number of podcasts over the past two years. Not to brag or anything, but I probably listen to an average of five per day. So it’s safe to say I know a good one when I hear it.

    The hardest part of listening to podcasts is finding good ones. The discovery process isn’t as simple as jumping on Google. And it can take you a few downloads and listens before you figure out if a podcast is right for you or not.

    So let me save you the bother. If you’re a copywriter looking for a podcast, here’s where you should start.

    Hot Copy with Kate Toon and Belinda Weaver

    I had to lead with this one, of course. Hot Copy is the first copywriting podcast I ever listened to, and boy am I glad I did. Kate and Belinda have put together an incredible collection of interviews, practical topics, and honest discussions for freelance copywriters. There’s plenty of newbie-friendly content, but they often dig deeper and get a bit more technical too.

    High-Income Business Writing Show with Ed Gandia

    I really enjoy this show. Ed does fantastic interviews that have helped open my eyes to the different types of copywriting out there and different business models to consider. And it’s also nice to know copywriting has the potential to make a decent income if you set yourself up right.

    The Pete Godfrey Persuasion Show

    I’ll be honest. At first, I didn’t really like this show. Maybe it was hearing my own bogan Australian accent reflected back at me. Maybe it was the strong opinions Pete shares. Or maybe the fact that he refers to himself as “The Wizard”.

    But I’m glad I stuck with it, because I actually love this show now. Pete’s honest, smart and, yes, opinionated.

    Fellow youngsters be warned. He’s pretty old school, and often voices his distaste for social media. So you’re not going to hear a lot about online marketing. But despite that, I’ve come to respect his opinions. Pete clearly knows his stuff about sales copywriting and direct response. And the dynamic between Pete and his co-host/producer Tam is quite funny. Sometimes I can almost hear her rolling her eyes with me on the other end of the call.

    Copy Chief Radio with Kevin Rogers

    Another fantastic show. Lots of interviews, how-tos, and common copywriting questions answered. I often find myself taking notes during these episodes so I can make the changes to my own offers, processes, and business right away.

    The Ray Edwards Show

    First of all, this show won’t be for everyone. But I really like it. Ray is super smart and offers excellent tips for copywriting, business, marketing, and life. I’d describe this show as a cross between a business coaching session and a Sunday sermon. I like how he combines faith and business, rather than trying to separate the two. You probably won’t agree with everything he says, but if it’s your jam you’ll love it.

    The Copywriter Club with Kira Hug and Rob Marsh

    LOVE this podcast. It’s always jam-packed with super useful tips. Rob and Kira mostly do interviews with successful copywriters, and it’s something different every week. The thing I like most about the format is that they don’t shy away from digging deep and asking the questions we all really want to ask. Like, “How did you get into it?”, “What are your processes like?”, “How much do you charge?” and “How do you actually make money?”

    I also like that Rob and Kira don’t pretend to have it all figured out. It often feels like they get as much from an interview as I do.

    Copywriters Podcast with David Garfinkel

    Another good one. David shares many nuggets of wisdom, and he’s an excellent storyteller. I could happily listen to him all day. He puts the focus on making money through sales and copywriting, so it’s always really practical. I find myself thinking bigger about my business after each episode.

    Good Copy, Bad Copy

    I haven’t listened to this one as much as the others yet. I think I only discovered it recently. (I’m a self-confessed podcast junkie so it’s hard to keep track.) But so far, so good. It’s another really practical one that mainly focuses on B2B copywriting.

    Everything else

    Just because you’re a copywriter doesn’t mean you should listen only to podcasts about copywriting. Think outside the box about what you might like to learn. Here are some other examples of podcast topics that can help you improve your copywriting techniques and business practices:

    • Sales/selling
    • Marketing
    • Branding
    • SEO
    • Psychology
    • Business

    But you could listen to just about anything really. Enriching your knowledge is almost always a worthy investment when you’re a copywriter. (Or maybe that’s just what I tell myself.)

    Over to you

    Have I missed anything? I’d love to add some more to my list. Leave a comment below with your favourite copywriting (or other) podcasts.

    :-) Angela

    About Angela

    Angela Rodgers is a copywriter in Brisbane. She writes strategic copy and content for smart B2B brands and small business. In between she wrangles two small people and lives off a combination of green tea and chocolate.

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    Google Docs for copywriters: A quick tutorial

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    A speedy tutorial on Google Docs and how it can be used by Copywriters when sharing 00  with your clients.

    Watch the video

    Read the transcript

    Hello fellow copywriters.

    It’s Kate Toon here, Head Copy Beast at the Clever Copywriting School.

    I just wanted to do a little video today about Google Docs. Now many of you will have used Google Docs already and probably know how it works, but yesterday I discovered how to track changes and I was pretty chuffed to find this.

    That’s what I’m going to talk about today, but also the pros and cons of using Word versus Google Docs, which is best when you’re sending draughts of copy to clients.

    Let’s get stuck in and have a look at Google Docs.

     

    For Google Docs you just head to Google Docs, just type ‘Google Docs’ into Google, here we go, Google Docs. Now you’ll already have to have a Google account, you can set one up. It’s the same account that you can use across all Google’s products, Google Analytics, Google Search Console, YouTube, Gmail, just having one global Google account.

    You come in here, you’ve obviously already signed up, and you head into Google Docs. Google Docs is a Cloud based storage system so it enables you to store documents in the Cloud and anyone can access them from wherever they are, depending on the access that you give them.

     

    Here we can see some of my Google documents.

    I use it a lot for podcast episodes and also for other documents where I have several different people looking at them. I write them, I get them proofread by someone.

    Then the guest needs to look at them, then my VA needs to grab them to take the content and put in a post.

    So a really great spot to have everything in one place rather than emailing documents around.

     

    Let’s have a look at one document here.

    Here’s a document that I recently did for a podcast. It looks just the same as Word and it has all the same functions along the top as Word as well, so you know you can do all the same things, formatting, got tools and spellchecker and all that kind of thing.

    You just type away normally, type here.

    Other things you can do is you can highlight content here and leave little comments like should we move this?

    And then that comment will sit there, someone else can answer that comment, so if you click here you can edit that comment, delete it, you can also link to it, so you could refer to a specific comment.

     

    If you want to reply you just click on it, and you can say, no, hide this, agree, and reply.

    Then, of course, once it’s all fixed up you can resolve it and the comment will disappear.

    That’s one little function but the function that I found yesterday was track changes, because what’s been happening obviously is my proofreader has been making changes in the document but I haven’t been able to see them.

    I’ve just had to trust them.

    She’s been adding comments where it’s something that’s up for debate.

     

    Yesterday I realised that if you click this little button here and change it to suggestions, then when I type in here, type words here, it highlights it in green.

    That means that later on I can come down through the document, I can see all the changes my proofreader has made, and I can choose either to accept the suggestion, reject the suggestion, or make a comment about the suggestion.

     

    This, for me, means that this is more usable with clients.

    You may be watching this and thinking, “I’ve always known that Kate, are you some kind of crazy idiot?”

    But hey, we all discover things everyday and I’m someone who’s far too busy, lazy, to ever watch tutorials on how to do things, so I kind of feel them out as I go along.

    That is a really useful trick.

    Of course with Google Docs you don’t have to press save, so everything you do is automatically being saved all the time. Of course once you’re done you can also come down into here and you can download the document if you do want to send it as a document.

    You can publish it if you want to, you can email it to certain collaborators, so to clients, or as an attachment.

     

    Now the other thing that’s always put me off about Google Docs was the inability to version, because what I like with my Word doc is I have a versioning table at the top.

    So something similar to this, it says this is version one, this is version two, so that I can go back and look at previous versions and say, “Well hey, you told me in version two to remove that paragraph so that’s why I did it.”

    So versioning is helpful for that, to track the changes that you’ve made for a job.

     

    Again, I recently discovered that you can see versions here.

    You can give each version a name, you can call this version one, and then moving forwards you can then create second version and third version. Y

    ou can actually go back in here and see the version history.

    It will show you previous changes that you’ve made to your documents, and also, maybe you make multiple changes but you don’t want that to be a new version, you can actually go through and see the changes but then when you’re at certain points, certain milestones, you can create a clean new version.

     

    For me, it’s finally got me over my aversion to using Google Docs with clients, cause those were my two concerns.

    The only issue is of course, that any new technology kind of makes your client a bit itchy. Most clients are used to Word, they use it every day.You might have to show them how to switch tracked changes on, but other than that they’re pretty good.

    Something about Google Docs freaks people out, I think specifically the fact that you can’t save documents, that really worries people, but I think you just need to take them through these elements here and show them that yes, you can download the document if you want to have a saved version.

    It is being saved all the time, you can create versions, you can track changes.

     

    That’s why I think Google Docs is pretty great, and maybe if you’re a copywriter and not using it already you can give it a try. Thanks for watching, you’ll find more videos and useful content at The Clever Copywriting School. See you there.

    ==

     

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    CopyCon and XERO: The perfect partnership

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    What Xero’s sponsorship means for the Copywriting Conference


    Well slap my bottom and call me Susan, I’m SOOOO excited to announce that Xero have signed on the dotted line as the primary supporter of CopyCon.
    (It’s Australia’s first and only copywriting conference don’t you know.)

    As the conference founder, I can happily say that Xero on board means ramping up my mini mission of helping both beginner and experienced copywriters do amazing things.

    When I started CopyCon last year, I wanted to give back to the copywriting community.

    I know how lonely it can get working as a freelancer and how tough it is to work in agencies.

    The conference gives copywriters of all shapes and sizes a chance to learn, connect and build a lovely, juicy support network.

    Last year’s event was a huge success, and this year I wanted to build the momentum with fresh speakers and an amazing Mastermind event.

    Hang on a minute, what is The Copywriting Conference?

    copycon

    The Copywriting Conference helps freelance and in-house copywriters build better businesses, learn new copywriting skills, and grow revenue with practical presentations, inspirational training and a peek at the latest copywriting trends.

    Having Xero as a sponsor means we can afford to deliver an excellent conference experience while keeping costs down.

    I know that freelance copywriters don’t have huge buckets of cash.

    And I’m also chuffed because Xero is one of the few software programs I use that doesn’t disappoint. It’s a brand I personally like and admire, especially their support for small business. (They were on my dream sponsor list).

    What does the sponsorship mean for CopyCon?

    Sponsors like Xero make events like mine viable. It puts a stamp of approval on the conference and the freelance industry as a whole. It feels like we’re heading in the right direction.

    Marina Holmes, Communications & Strategic Relations Director, Xero Australia, had this to say about her decision to get involved with CopyCon.

    “It’s important to sponsor events like CopyCon. In this day in age, content cannot be underestimated as a means to connect.

    And this event is a beautiful blend of supporting storytelling and the small businesses behind the words.  (KT – so true it is!)

    There is nothing more courageous than a person willing to embrace entrepreneurship, go out on their own and create a business from the ground up.”

    The feedback from 2017 CopyCon was exceptional and I felt there was something really special about the first year. It was amazing to meet a whole bunch of people for the first time in real life.

    Yes, we all connect online via The Clever Copywriting School Community and other groups, but there’s something incredible about meeting in person.

    CopyCon brought us all together.

    And this year it will again.

    There’s a tangible, fluffy kind of excitement that comes from people just wanting to learn and hear from speakers who are there to make a difference in their businesses. Plus we have really good muffins.

    Meet Marina

    Marina Holmes

    The other good news is that Marina Holmes from Xero will be giving a presentation around Xero’s overall content strategy (more details coming soon).

    “Leading a communications team for a company with more than 500,000 small businesses customers across Australia, I am lucky enough to see firsthand the lasting power of authentic storytelling.”

    Content marketing and content strategy is both a personal passion and a core business focus for the future – and Xero will continue to invest in new ideas and smart minds to bring our diverse customer stories to life.”

    So there you go people. That’s my exciting news.

     

     

    copycon

    By the way if you’re a sponsor reading this and interested in joining Xero in the cool sponsors club – just get in touch.

    P.S. I can’t finish this blog without a big thank you to Amanda Vanelderen, my erstwhile Sponsorship Manager who worked her socks of to help me create attractive sponsorship packages and charm the pants off the right people.

     

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop








    8 smart tips for beginner copywriters

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Carla Anderson

     

    15 Australian Copywriters Share Their Best Advice

    No matter your professional background, being a newbie copywriter involves juggling a lot of business-balls and fine-tuning a stack of skills and processes. Wouldn’t it be good to fast-forward this starting-from-scratch business, with a little help from some (copywriting) friends?

    Here, 15 of Australia’s leading copywriters share their best tips for newbie copywriters.

    Your past experiences make you a better copywriter

    Marie-Pier copywriterA good copywriter brings more than just strong writing skills to a project. All past experiences, professional and personal, enhance your writing and give you a better understanding of different audiences.

    “My tip is sometimes you need to spend time living to become a good copywriter,” says Marie-Pier Rochon, Copywriter.

    “Don’t forget, the times you’re not sitting down writing copy you’re still living things that might come in handy as inspiration later on.”

     

    Emily Rhodes, of Emily Writes points out clients value previous professional experience.Emily Rhodes copywriter

    “Your skills for writing will be self-evident if you’ve decided to go down this path,” Emily says.

    “I haven’t had to sell that aspect of my service pretty much to anyone since I’ve started doing this. What I’ve really found valuable to sell is all the other experience I can bring to the table from previous corporate roles. All my previous job history has made attracting the right clients, the clients I want to work with, and the clients I do the best jobs for much easier.”

    Find yourself a supportive community

    Nicole leedham copywriterNicole Leedham of Black Coffee Communication offers her biggest tip for newcomers to copywriting – and that is, find yourself a supportive community of like-minded peers.

    “I came from a reasonably cutthroat industry where everything was a competition. I floundered on my own for about 12 months before I was invited to join Kate’s (Toon’s) Google+ group. Suddenly I saw a whole lot of people doing the same things as me with the same struggles – that was awesome. I really wish Kate had started The Clever Copywriting School about six years earlier; that would have been perfect.”  

    Make sure you are clear on the Brief

    Angela Denly

    Angela Denly, cites the importance of open and continued communication with your clients.

    “Something I wish I’d known at the start is that if you don’t understand just keep asking questions and don’t just try and fluff your way through.”

     

    Johanna Kohler, of Compelling Copy agrees.Johanna Kohler copywriter

    “Make sure you get the detailed brief that you need so you can write the best copy for your client. And, if you need more information from your client, go back and ask again. It’s in everyone’s best interests for the brief to be clear from the start.”

     

    Your business’ most valuable asset is you

    Andrew Lau copywriter

    Andrew Lau, Copywriter says being good to yourself is equally important as any other aspect of your business.

    “With your own business, you’re working all the time because you want it to succeed. But that has a price and that is your health. So, taking the time to rest, taking the time to sleep properly, taking the time away from thinking about what you are meant to do next is really important.”

    Bill Harper copywriter

    Bill Harper says valuing your time and skills is also important.

    “If the terms of a deal aren’t in your favour either get the terms changed or, if they won’t budge, then you need to walk away. Yes, it may impact your income, you may have to sell that second kidney or whatever, but ultimately it’s going to put you in good stead.”

    Be a (copywriter) rule-breaker

    Go on. Admit it. Sally Cameron copywriterYou’re already a bit of a rebel for choosing this freelance copywriting path. Sally Cameron, of Sally Cameron Copywriting wants you to know that it’s okay to set the ‘rules’ that work best for your business and clients.

    “I have a bit of a confession to make. The truth is, in the history of my business, I’ve never actually produced a ‘proper’ proposal. What I actually do is produce what is essentially a one-page quotation document and literally, all that covers is what they are going to get, how much it’s going to be and importantly, how they can pay me for it. And that’s literally it. Why do I do this? By that stage, they already know everything they need to know about me. There’s no point reiterating what they’ve read on my website and the fact of the matter is I don’t have time to write it, they don’t have time to read it, so why not actually provide what they need. As a result of doing that I’ve got a really high propose-to-close ratio.”

    Use your time wisely for work, family and learning

    Ali Strachan, Copywriter believes managing your time when working from home is vital.Alison Strachan Copywriter

    “Make sure your work is within set parameters in your day. You need to structure your day so there is a beginning and an end, otherwise you’ll end up working all the time.”

    Andrea Rowe, of Your Coastal ConAndrea Rowe copywriternection adds that keeping your time focused on what actually earns you an income – writing – is also important.

    “It’s really important to put some parameters around your professional development time and information gathering time, otherwise you’ll be sucked down the rabbit hole of looking at what everybody else is doing, and learning and learning and not writing,” she says.

    Tegan Ang copywriter

    Tegan Ang of Writing Your Story says nothing beats sitting down to write copy as the most effective way to improve your skills in copywriting.

    “I’ll take every course under the sun, but when it comes to copywriting, doing it is so much better than learning about it.”

    Invest in yourself and your business

    As a copywriter, you need to invest in yourself, your business and your professional development.

    “I enjoyed CopyCon immensely and I’d recommend every copywriter try and get to it next year,” says Duncan Waldron, Copywriter.

    Sarah Joy Pierce copywriterMy top tip is to invest in yourself and back yourself,” says Sarah-Joy Pierce of Joyful Communications.

    “Case in point today, I invested in a proper desktop monitor, keyboard and proper mouse, rather than just working from my trusty MacBook. I’ve written on it for about an hour now, and I tell you what, there’s going to be some great productivity increases from that. Now that I’ve done it, I don’t know why I didn’t do it ages ago, because the productivity increase will easily pay for itself.”

     

    Step outside your comfort zone

    You need to push yourself out of your comfort zone to succeed as a freelance copywriter.Sandy Taylor copywriter

    “My tip for anybody starting a business, whether it’s copywriting or anything else, is take on all the jobs, all the clients, all the work – anything that comes along. Because it’s only once you are doing it that you work out what jobs you like to do,” advises Sandy Taylor, of Sandy Taylor Marketing and Design.

    “You do have to be able to get out there and put yourself front and centre, whether that’s about joining a networking group or about going and meeting with clients,” says Estelle Fallon, Copywriter.

    “Put yourself out there, believe that you can do it, have fun, and most of all remember, you are a copywriter.

    Conclusion

    There’s a lot to learn when you’re a newbie copywriter. Learning from others makes that a whole lot easier. Want more tips? Check out these earlier round-ups:

    Over to you

    What’s the one thing you wish you’d known when you began your copywriting business? What’s your favourite tip? Share your comments below.

    If you liked this article please share.

    Carla Beth Copywriter

    About Carla Anderson

    Carla Anderson, from C Beth Anderson Communication is a communication strategist and copywriter. She works with brands, social enterprises and nonprofits who ‘do Good’, and specialises in education content writing.

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    Contact Name:

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    Home office frenemies: Why a co-working space might be just what you need

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Andrew Lau

     

    A few good reasons to get out of the house

    Last summer, I spent the first few weeks physically baking in my apartment. For the first time, I went looking for a nice air conditioned co-working office space.

    Ahhh…in that co-working space, my productivity was like an arrow released from a tightly strung bow – with precise focus I was piercing the air, eyes set on splitting open copywriting apples.

    Til then, I’d run my copywriting business from the home office. I didn’t realise I’d become comfortable with a whole host of little sh*ts sucking my time away.

    The home office frenemies.

    Home office frenemies are a drag on your time and business. They’re a distraction you either enjoy, feel good accomplishing or even something annoying that you’ve come to accept as part of your routine.

    The frenemies smile, call to you like a siren’s song, and pour honeyed potions of promise into your mind. They brainwash you into giving them your precious business time – every single day.

    It wasn’t until I worked in that share space, with my office frenemies safely at home, that I realised the hold they had on me.

    I’m not the first person to get sucked in and I’m definitely not going to be the last. We’re all susceptible. Here are some reasons you might need to get outta the house…

    Home Office Frenemy 1 – SNACKING

    Crunchy, cheesy, twisty bits. Salty caramelised popcorn. Cheese. Deep-fried thinly sliced bits of potato seasoned with weird artificial chicken flavouring. Cheese. Biscuits. Rice crackers. Did I mention cheese? Weird radioactive deep fried Japanese peas coated in explosive wasabi batter.

    Snacking is like crack to me.

    Can’t think of a headline? Stuck on a website you’re writing? They’re waiting. Your loyal frenemy. Snacking will help, right?

    When you start, you can’t stop. Those corporate bastards designed those junk food bliss points deliberately to distract you from your work. By the time you get to the bottom of a bag of chips, you’ve wasted 20 minutes.

    In a share space, your access to junk food is limited. There’s usually a vending machine, but the price of this convenience will give your wallet a whacking.

    No junk food? More time for work.

    Home Office Frenemy 2 – CLEANING

    Clean sheets that smell like spring, blue sky and rainbows. Nicely pressed shirts you never wear. A tidy kitchen with a fruit bowl nicely arranged like one out of a classic Jan Davidsz de Heem painting. A toilet that smells like roses.

    I like clean. I like tidy. I like that fake rose smell because I’m allergic to flowers.

    If you’re partial to clean and tidy surroundings, this little frenemy is a convenient time suck on every writer who just can’t get the words out.

    If you’re on deadline and inspiration is nowhere to be seen, it’s easier to do the washing or scrub some dishes. It’s even easier arranging fruit like a Dutch master.

    In a share space, there’s no cleaning to do unless you want to wipe down the communal kitchen bench. (If you’re doing that, your procrastination has gone next level.)

    No cleaning? More writing.

    Home Office Frenemy 3 – TELEVISION

    Afternoon re-runs where everyone cries if their cooking isn’t perfect. Getting caught up in the story of a middle-aged man building a meth empire. Or the one where 27 girls date the same guy. Frenemy television doesn’t rely on quality programming, anything will do.

    When the final dish succeeds, you’re elated. When the girl gets the guy, sun shines on your soul. When crystal blue starts selling on the streets, you feel you’ve seen the birth of a meaningful new brand.

    Home Office Frenemy 3 is all about distracting yourself in the universe of make-believe.

    But it’s a deep rabbit hole. Like Alice through the looking glass, you enter a strange parallel world where no work gets done and you miss all your deadlines.

    In the share space, there’s no television except the one in reception. Think you can take your frenemy with you and catch up on Netflix? Think again. They eat up so much data, the management will be all over you before you can say pass the popcorn.

    Home Office Frenemy 4 – NOISE

    Techno beats thump through the wall. Random lawnmowers splutter. Jackhammers sound like they’re ready to bring down the house. Kids are screaming outside your window, reminding you how old you really are.

    I put up with noise for a long time because I thought it was part of life. But excessive noise is nobody’s friend. We make a frenemy of it when we choose to live with it. We even make the excuse – “work didn’t get done, it was too noisy.”

    Noise is distracting and draining. The share space? It’s usually silent. And if there’s noise from a bunch of start-up kids reciting dialogue from the entire Star Wars saga you can always SHOOSH them.

    Because it’s officially a share space for working, not chatting.

    Tried a co-working space and hated it?

    Okay, so you might be one of those people who just hates sharing a space. Or you’re a shut-in who doesn’t want to leave the house. Or you like having a shower every time you take a dump. Or…you just don’t like other human beings.

    If you’re coasting along, writing your life away, bringing in business and succeeding, then hat’s off to you. Good on ya!

    But if you’re at home struggling with your home office frenemies, a co-working

    office space may be what you’ve been looking for.

    Gorging on junk food, obsessing over reality TV, steam cleaning your carpet the 80th time and listening to the soothing sounds of jackhammers and construction? These are all signs the frenemies might be ruining your business.

    Do you have home office frenemies?

    Are you thinking about working in a co-working office space? Comment below and let us know the good and the bad of working in a co-working space and if it slayed your frenemies.

    Andrew Lau copywriter

    About Andrew

    Andrew Lau is a copywriter, partly obsessed with deep fried chicken drumsticks but wholly obsessed with the movies. What a nerd.

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop