An interview with Copywriter Mary Cameron

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Mary Cameron from 4Words

     

    Who are you Mary Cameron?

    Kiwi with Scots roots, lifelong coast dweller now living ‘la vie bretonne’ in regional France. Distance runner, cold water swimmer, wife to a darling husband, mother to a lovely lad, bossed by a ginger cat, scared of heights, grumpy loser of board games, often curled up with a crime novel.

     

    What did you do before you became a copywriter?

    I championed ‘fewer words, more meaning’ as a TAFE comms lecturer, a freelance writer and editor, and manager of a handful of award-winning digital training projects. Just before swapping my best black frocks and big girl shoes for jeans and sneakers I managed comms for a primary health care organisation.

     

    How long have you been copywriting?

    Since ‘forever’ (around 30 years), and long before I knew copywriting was a thing. Officially as boss of 4Words since 2013.

     

    What has been your biggest copywriting career win?

    Turning one-off jobs into long-term relationships where I write everything for years. Having all my lovely loyal clients stick with me when I moved to the other side of the planet. Every win, big or small, feels like a gift from copy gods whom I try to please by writing succinct, smiley, dead good stuff.

     

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    I overestimated my capacity to keep working while my son was recovering from a near-fatal car accident. (He’s fine now.) I spent six horrendous weeks trying to complete a huge website job on a laptop during hospital vigils. I didn’t finish it.

     

    What are your number one fave copywriting tools?

    I’m keen on the brutality of the Hemingway app, and the reliability of Grammarly. I also love my human proofreader’s “What were you thinking?” function that’s triggered by an occasional bit of untidy copy. Eddie Shleyner’s micro articles at ‘VeryGoodCopy’ also restore my perspective.

     

    How do you deal with self-doubt?

    I’ve come to see it as a ‘force for good’ that keeps me on my creative toes. In more than 40 years of tolerably successful lecturing and presenting and copywriting I can count my impostor syndrome-free days on one hand. It never quits, so I’ve learned to smile at self-doubt and love the way it helps me stay honest, curious and brave about practicing my craft.

     

    What work-life balance/mental health tips do you have? 

    I’m a confirmed creature of habit. My morning routine keeps my head in order and sets me up to deal with whatever happens next. It goes like this: coffee, a run/swim, meditation, breakfast, work. Sadly, after half a century of practice, I’m still crap at sticking to reasonable working hours. Recently I resolved to have Sundays off.

     

    What tip would you pass onto any newbie copywriters?

    Apart from my observations on managing self-doubt, I suggest doing a stint with a great agency. (They are out there.) There’s no better way to get to grips with working under pressure to create passable copy for a range of clients.

     

     

    What’s next for you?

    “On verra: (“We’ll see”). I’ve just shrunk my copywriting niche to focus on small businesses keen on making a big difference. I may write “The too-long journey”, a kids’ book that’s been wafting around in my head since my son gave me the title as a toddler. I might flood my favourite journals with ‘grumpy old dame’ opinion pieces.

     

    Why do you love TCCS?

    TCCS is a boot camp and a sanctuary. I wouldn’t be half as professionally skilled and confident as I am without Kate’s tough love, generous advice and brilliant courses. Furthermore, my freelance life is hugely enriched by sharing trials and triumphs with these gorgeous copy beasts. Finally, some of my favourite clients found me via the TCCS directory.

     

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    An interview with Copywriter Angela Denly

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Angela Denly from Angela Denly Writing and Communications Services

    We love our members, hard. Harder than a hard thing.
    This year several are celebrating their 4th or – gasp 5th year with us. And we wanted to share their stories with you.

    First off the mark, the original Copy Beast, Angela Denly. The first to join, and celebrated MEMBER OF THE YEAR in 2018.

    She’s an all round good egg, who is always on hand to help with advice in the community.

    Here’s her story.

     

    Who are you Angela Denly?

    Angela Denly (Ange to just about everyone) is a Sydney-based copywriter who loves helping businesses that mean what they say to say what they mean.
    As well as being awesome at B2B communications, she loves writing for food and beverage clients to mix things up.

    Ange is unashamedly a part-time copywriter, fitting her business into school hours and providing a taxi service to her two daughters from 3pm onwards.

     

    What did you do before you became a copywriter?

    I started my working life as an office manager at Surf Life Saving NSW and discovered a love for communications.

    I went on to study public relations, and worked in PR agencies for nearly 10 years. I worked mainly in technology PR, with a focus on B2B campaigns.

     

    How long have you been copywriting?

    I’ve been a copywriter for about six years. But I’ve essentially been paid to write for more than 15 years now.


    What has been your biggest copywriting win?

    Ooh, tough one.
    Probably my first project in the food and beverage space, as it was such a big win convincing someone I could do more than B2B, tech and professional services type stuff.
    It took a big leap of confidence to go after a new segment and make the project a success.

     

    What was your worst copywriting career fail?

    Any time a client is disappointed is hard.
    You pour so much of yourself into jobs, and when it doesn’t hit the mark it hurts.
    I’ve really only had one job where I knew the client wasn’t happy, and even though I knew I’d done the best I could and tried to resolve things, it still hangs over me a little bit.

     

    What’s your number one fave copywriting tool?

    My essentials are my laptop and an internet connection. Everything else is just nice to have.

     

    How do you deal with self-doubt?

    Not well.

    I have a little crew of buddies I regularly go to for pep talks and sanity checking quotes when I have those “Why the hell do you think you can do this job?”  and “WTF are you thinking with that ridiculous quote?” moments.

    As long-term TCCC members will know, I’m also pretty shameless about asking for advice to lift me up.

     

    What work-life balance/mental health tips do you have?

    I’m a big believer in making time for exercise.
    But I’m pretty rubbish at disciplining myself to do it, so I pay a personal trainer to keep me accountable and make sure I turn up.

    As a mum to two primary-school-aged kids, I’m also pretty strict on being realistic about how much work I can fit into school hours.

    It’s rare for me to work past 3pm and I try to keep weekends work-free too.
    This space to play is important, and helps to keep my life in check.

    Finally, I’m a recovering perfectionist so I’m a fan of asking myself, “Is this work good enough?” I try not to agonise over a draft before sending it to a client for review.

    I’ll write it, check that it meets the brief, and then send it before I get too caught up in my own head. And you know what? Ninety percent of the tim, the client has minimal edits.

    So just sending it saves me countless hours of rewrites and heartache.

     

     

    What tips would you pass onto any newbie copywriters?

    • Read more.
    • Read the back of the cereal box (just like seven-year-old me used to do).
    • Read the news. Read that fluffy chick-lit book without guilt.
    • Read the latest non-fiction blockbuster.
    • Read everything and absorb different ideas and ways of playing with language.

     

    What’s next for you?

    As my confidence has grown, I’ve started working with better-known businesses.
    I’m looking forward to that continuing and being braver and bolder in my own marketing.

     

    Finally, why do you love The Clever Copywriting Community?

    I love the companionship and water cooler chit-chat that I miss from working in an office. (I always took 30 minutes to make a cup of tea because I was having a chat).
    And the fact that online connections have blossomed into real, deep friendships about the stuff that matters in our lives beyond punctuation and persuasive language.

     

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    How copywriters can manage a bad Facebook review (and win new fans in the process)

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Step by step ways to handle both real and fake negative reviews

    This post was written by TCCS member, Dayarne Smith

     

    For most copywriters it feels like a knife to the heart when a client leaves a bad Facebook review. We feel all the emotions, twice. How could they? What an arsehat. Am I a terrible writer?

    It’s hard not to take it personally, but the way you handle a crappy review makes all the difference. Don’t get emotional, respond professionally and if appropriate, try to make it up to them. If you get it right, you could actually make your clients love you more.

     

    Is it real, or fake?

    Truth is, most humans are quite self-centred.

    We want our needs met right now, and for goods and services to live up to our expectations. When that doesn’t happen, it’s way too easy to jump online and let the world know.

    Most negative feedback falls into two categories:

    1. It’s a fair complaint and you should deal with it (even if it’s petty)
    2. The review is fake – they’ve never been a client

     

    It’s a fair complaint, what should I do?

    Let’s say Susan gave you a blast on Facebook, claiming your customer service was terrible. She wanted a copywriting quote and contacted you through your website three times. Susan didn’t get a reply, so she left you a scathing review.

    What this could mean is your website contact form is broken and Susan’s done you a favour. How many other potential leads have you lost because you didn’t know the form wasn’t working?

     

    Here’s a simple 3-step solution

     

    1. Remove the emotion

    After you’ve finished swearing at your iPad – take a few deep breaths and calm down. Don’t respond while you’re upset or angry.

    Remove the emotion from the scenario and look at it objectively. Ask yourself – is the criticism fair?

    Could you have done more to prevent the problem? Is there room to improve your processes to make sure it doesn’t happen again. (Fix that broken contact form, dammit!)

     

    2. Respond publicly, discuss privately

    Once you’re calm, think about how you can resolve the problem. Don’t ignore the review. Respond with an apology if appropriate and ask them to contact you by direct message or email.

    By taking the conversation private, it’s easier for you to get the information you need. Often, people leave negative reviews because they want to be heard. Listen to their issue and try to understand it from their point of view.

    If the review is obscene or offensive, you should report it to Facebook through the ‘Find Support or Report Recommendation’ button.

     

    3. Schmooze a little

    Try to make things right. That might mean redoing some work, replacing a product, fixing a process, or sending a voucher or small gift.

    If you come to an amicable resolution, add a comment on the review explaining how you solved the problem.

    For example:
    “Hi Susan, thanks for giving us the opportunity to resolve the problem. We didn’t realise our website contact form was broken. We have fixed it and hope you’ll enjoy the little gift we’ve sent you in the mail.”

    * Note: Don’t do this if the customer is still angry – you risk them responding with another nasty comment. A tit-for-tat Facebook war never looks professional.

    Here’s the recap:

    • don’t ignore it
    • stay calm
    • respond publicly, deal with it privately
    • apologise if it’s warranted
    • make it up to them (if you can)

    And when all else fails …

    Move on.

    Even if you’re a true professional and do all the right things, sometimes people won’t be happy. Don’t sweat it.

    Make sure you’re in the habit of asking all your clients for reviews. At the end of every copywriting job send an email to the client with links to Facebook, Google, and other places you’d like them to leave you a review.

    This way, positive reviews will drown out the bad. Most people will use common sense to make a fair judgement that you if have 47 fab reviews and 2 negative ones, then you’re probably great at your job.

     

    What if the review is a big, dirty fake

    Couldn’t you scream with the unfairness of it? Fake reviews are the worst.

    Do you have a jealous competitor trying to get a leg up? Or someone who really doesn’t like you? No matter who the dirty culprit is, it’s a horrible experience.

    Here’s how to tackle the problem head on

     

    1. Don’t ignore it – call them out on their skullduggery

    Stay calm and professional, but make sure you respond. If you’re confident the reviewer has never been a client of yours, say so.

    Reply with something like:

    “Hello Kevin. I keep a comprehensive client database and have no record of ever working with you. Could you please contact me by email with more information so I can get to the bottom of this.”

     

    2. Report the comment to Facebook

    As soon as you post a reply, report the review through the ‘Find Support or Report Recommendation’ button. You can then choose a reason for reporting, including:

    • Unfair recommendation
    • Spam
    • Harassment
    • Recommendation not relevant
    • Violence

     

    3. Drown it out with positive reviews

    You should always seek reviews and testimonials from clients, but if it’s been a while, start now.

    Get in touch with as many clients as you can and ask them to leave you a Facebook review. Include a link to make it easier for them.

     

    You’ll come out the other side

    It mightn’t feel like it at the time, but you will come out the other side of a bad Facebook review. Your ego might be bruised, but it’ll blow over. And if you handle it well, you’ll win some new admirers who were impressed with the way you handled your business.

    Have you ever had to deal with a bad Facebook review? Do you have any helpful tips to add?

     

    About Dayarne Smith

    Dayarne Smith is a freelance copywriter helping businesses build brand awareness and win new customers. Dayarne knows boring copy doesn’t sell, so she crafts quality content with a fun, creative edge.

     

     

     

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    How to create and add animated gifs to emails

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Today, I’m going to be explaining how to create and add animated gifs to emails.

    If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably sent out an email newsletter and it can be a struggle to make them look exciting and interesting to read. So today, I’m going to give you a little tip to show you how you can add animated gifs to your email newsletters to make them just that little more exciting.

     

    Watch the video:

     

     

    I’ve just animated this gif in a sales email that I’m sending out for The Recipe for SEO Success eCourse. And the reason I’ve used it is because I’m talking about a video that I have that is on the home page of that site. And also, it adds a bit of visual interest into an otherwise static email.

     

    So that’s what we’re going to do but obviously you can also use these little animated gifs in blog posts as well.

    So what do we use to make these? We use a tool called Giphy and this is giphy.com. You just click the create button at the top and you’ll be brought to this page here. All you need to do now is find a YouTube video, it can be a YouTube video of your own or one that you like online, or you can use a Vimeo video or a vine link and just pop them in here.

    So I’m going to use one of the videos from my Youtube channel. I can pick anyone here.

    Let’s pick this one and we’ll just take the URL from the top. We go back into Giphy and we drop the URL in here and then what happens is Giphy will load the video into its player and you can see it’s starting to play here.

    You can then decide how long you want your gif to be and which bits of the video you want to capture. So I don’t want to capture this bit here, I want to capture some of my head so I’m going to move it up here so you can see it’s starting to record. And what it will do is it will show you how much is turning into gif. And you can make the gif longer or shorter so the longer it is, the bigger the file will be but also the more realistic it will look, it will look like a little video is actually playing.

    So I tend to go around 4 seconds – I don’t know why, that just seems good for me. You can add captions. If you do, they will appear at the bottom of the gif and you can change the colour and the text of those. There’s limited options but there’s a few options there. And then you can tag this so you can find it for the future or other people could find it and use it, if they want to have a weird gif of me talking then there they have it. And then you’ve got a little button here.

    There’s your URL there. You’ve got a button here. Just press create gif and Giphy will go ahead and turn that into an animated gif you can then use.

    And here we are – here’s my little gif animating away so that’s perfect.

    I can share this on Facebook, or Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, Instagram – whatever I want to. And I also have a little iframe here so I can actually embed this.

    If I take this code here, I can pop this into a blog post. Just make sure that you’re in the coding tab of your blog post rather than the text tab.

    You can just drop that in. Now you can also get links to the actual Giphy links, there’s an html5? video version, you can download the gif, you can upload the gif to Twitter. Lots of different options there. You can also create a little shorter version of the Giphy link as well.

    But what we want to do is we want to actually drop this into our Mailchimp emails – So I use Mailchimp for my emails. And I’ll include a link in the notes with this video on a help document that will help you do this.

    So here’s the document that Mailchimp has that explains it.

    I’m just going to show you this in real life.

    So we’ve already got one in here and we want to add another one. We can either add another image or you can just duplicate this little box. Here we go, now we’ve got me twice – how terrifying! And we also want to replace this animated gif. So we click on replace and then we can do a couple of things. One thing we can do is go up here and click import from Giphy. And what it will do is look for all the gifs in Giphy and try and find your gif.

    So if I type in Kate Toon, you will see the issue that I have is it’s not finding my Giphy and you’ll see that unfortunately the issue that you get is that because your gif is relatively new, it’s not coming up. Instead we have a lot of other strange things coming up so I want to get rid of that quickly.

    Instead what I ended up doing was actually importing the gif from my desktop.

    So what I did is I created a little gif. Here it is, you can see it here. And I put that on my desktop and then I simply uploaded that gif from my desktop. So just simply dragged it on, there we go it’s been dragged on and there it is and I can select that and it will drop in.

    So I’ve got two. Now if I want to maybe use that other gif that I created, I just go to this area here. I’ll download it again to my desktop and then I’ll go back to my emails. I’ll replace, I’ll find that document – that gif that I created that I want to download – drop it on and once it’s there, you can see there it is. I can select it and now this gif is there as well.

    And it’s that simple and then what you can do is you can send a test of that email to yourself and make sure that it is animating. And that’s it, it’s that simple and obviously what you can do is you can use this little tool to create gifs whenever you want, to use in your own blogs. And obviously therefore what you can do is use this great little tool to create your own gifs for whatever you want – for blog posts, for social media, for Instagram – that are actually personalised to you.

    So I hope that was helpful, a little video on how to use animated gifs in your Mailchimp emails and also for blogs as well. And I’ll include links to all the tools I’ve mentioned today in the notes for this video on the website at www.copywritingschool.com.au. Thanks for watching!

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop