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    Get your groove back with an EOFY business check-up

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Job posted: 13/06/18

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    This post was written by TCCS member, Joh Kohler

     

    It’s almost the end of the financial year (EOFY) in Australia. And you know what that means, freelancers. Yes, you can celebrate with Tim Tams instead of Milk Arrowroots in your morning cuppa. Woo-hoo!

    Let’s be honest. Without a corporate drinks budget the EOFY isn’t as much fun as it used to be. But that’s about to change.

    Because starting now, the EOFY means it’s time for your annual business check-up partay. Let’s see how you’ve gone this year and plan for where you want to be next year.

    I know you’d rather be drinking Prosecco on the boss’s dime. Unfortunately, these days the boss’s dime is your dime. But don’t worry, you can still party like it’s 30 June.

    Just grab this excellent annual appraisal template and your slightly-less-sad tea-dunking biscuits and let’s get to it!

    To get the party vibe going, I’ve created this EOFY party playlist just for you.

     

    Stop. Collaborate and listen

    Track: Ice Ice Baby, Vanilla Ice

    First, stop and check your goals and expectations. Let’s see how you went against the plans you had for yourself this year.

    Are you on track? What goals did you smash? What goals didn’t you quite get there with, and why?

    Don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t tick them all off. Things happen. Plans change. But this is a chance to ask yourself why, and see if you need to do anything differently next year. (Or you might decide those goals don’t suit your business anymore, which is fine too.)

     

    Clients can be tricky, tricky, tricky, tricky

    Track: It’s Tricky, Run-DMC

    Clients are what it’s all about. You’re here for them, but it can be a rollercoaster ride. Some clients are sweet little dreams.

    They give excellent briefs, provide specific feedback, and pay on time. (Gotta love that.)

    But others are… well, we’ve all had a PITA or two. How have your clients been this year? Did you pick up some dreams, or a bunch of nightmares?

    What lessons have you learnt from those PITA clients? Was it you, or them (or both)? There’s a lot to consider and review when it comes to how you manage your client relationships.

     

     

    Check yo self before you wreck yo self

    Track: Check Yo Self, Ice Cube

    As a copywriter, your approach to your work can make or break you. If you let yourself get too distracted or deflated when things don’t go to plan, you’ll start to feel that running your own business is worse than gainful employment. (It’s not. Okay, it is. But it’s really not.)

    Checking in on yourself is essential. You need to understand your motivations and your way of working. You need to find a way to run your business and have a life. (Yes, it is possible.)

    And if things are feeling a little out of control, use this business check-up party to set better plans and processes for next year.

     

    Can your copy dig it?

    Track: Whoomp! (There It Is), Tag Team

    Ugh. Reviewing your actual copywriting is H.A.R.D. It’s fine to say you could do better at your processes or your financial management because that’s not what you do, right? What you do is write. You communicate.

    You put your heart and soul into every last letter.

    So it’s hard to admit maybe you didn’t write beautifully all the time. Maybe there was that one client whose brief was so thin you tried to pull it out of the air, only to have the project turn pear-shaped.

    Or perhaps you need to admit that without Grammarly, your work would be full of typos. But it’s important to review your actual work. Is your writing process working? Are you a better copywriter this year? They’re hard questions in this part of the appraisal, but there’s gold in the answers.

     

    Push it real good

    Track: Push It, Salt-N-Pepa

    For people who write marketing words for a living, us copywriters can find it hard to put ourselves out there. Sadly, clients won’t just appear out of nowhere.

    So you need to market your services. Now’s the time to check in with your marketing, brand and presence. You know what you need to be doing, so use this opportunity to give yourself the kick up the behind you need to start doing it. Celebrate your marketing successes, and set a few goals for your brand over the next year.

     

     

    Makes me wonder how I keep from goin’ under 

    Track: The Message, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five

    Talking financials might make you want to crawl under the blanket with a spoon and a tub of ice cream*, but it’s got to be done.

    You may be a copywriter because you’ve always loved writing, but you know you love writing more when someone’s paying you cold hard cash to do it. Be ruthless when you review this section.

    If your revenue is lagging, this pricing course might help you decide if you’re charging enough. Put actual numbers on actual paper (I know you prefer words, but go with it). Your next-year-EOFY-self will thank you, I promise.

    *I have never crawled under the blanket with a spoon and a tub of ice cream. (It was Nutella.)

     

    You’ve got the power

    Track: The Power, SNAP!

    Give yourself a loud round of applause. The hardest part of your annual appraisal is over. Yes, you’ve almost finished your EOFY business check-up. And you survived.

    Now it’s time to put it all together and think how you did overall. What were your biggest wins and most significant areas for improvement? Once you can answer those questions, you’ll have the power to move forward and take your copywriting business where you want it to go.

     

    On your mark, ready set, let’s go

    Track: Getting’ Jiggy Wit It, Will Smith

    Last song and last task. This one’s the fun one. It’s time to set your action plans and business goals for the next financial year.

    Look at what you’ve discovered about your business, and design your goals to improve the areas that need a little help and make the most of the stuff you’re doing well. Don’t forget to make your goals SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely. Because a goal that isn’t smart is a goal you won’t achieve.

     

     

    Operation Grown Up Business

    Encore track: Bust A Move, Young MC

    Today was my EOFY business check-up party (rock on). I used the annual appraisal form to honestly and thoughtfully review my year as a copywriter.

    As a result, I’m launching Operation Grown Up Business #OGUB. It’s aimed at improving my part-time business and getting it ready to go full-time. I need to improve my processes (and set up a grown-up business bank account). While partying to the music of my youth, I’ve been planning the business of my future. Now I know what things I want to do, learn, get rid of, and keep in my business over the next 12 months.

    To keep me honest, here are my top five goals for Operation Grown Up Business:

    1. Achieve a set revenue goal each month

    I’ve come up with a challenging, yet attainable monthly amount I want to (and need to) achieve next year.

    1. Launch a new product/service

    I’ve been playing with the idea of launching a new service to help my clients. It’s not entirely new—I already do it occasionally. But next year I’m going to do it (and sell it) better.

    1. Publish one blog per month on my website

    This is going to be tough. I always feel like I’m too busy writing content for clients to write content for me. So I’m going to become my own client and plan a strategy and schedule for my blogs. (Why can’t we do for ourselves what we do for our clients?)

    1. Refine my processes

    I have processes. But they could be better. A lot better. By the end of the next financial year (hopefully earlier) my processes will be refined, documented and followed to a tee.

    1. Complete a course or attend a conference

    This one’s easy. CopyCon 2019 here I come.

     

    How did your EOFY business check-up party go?

    How’d you go? Got some goals set? Feeling ready to wrap this financial year up and move onto the next? Rediscovered your love of ‘80s and ‘90s hip-hop? Tell us what you learnt from your EOFY business check-up party in the comments. 

    If you liked this article, please share:

     

    About Joh Kohler

    Johanna Kohler Bio image

    Joh Kohler creates compelling content and copy for small businesses, big brands and government agencies. When she’s not writing, she likes to dance (badly). You can follow Joh on Facebook at Compelling Copy.

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    Phone quote fear: how to avoid feeling pressured into giving a price

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Job posted: 24/04/17

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Or, 5 easy ways to stop getting cornered into phone quoting

    I know that lots of clients want to discuss pricing up front.

    But us copywriters are kind of less keen.

    Why?

    Because we’re terrified of being cornered.

    We’re worried about giving a price, then kicking ourselves afterwards when we realise it was too low.

    We’re worried we’ll quote too high and scare the client off.

    We’re worried we’ll fluff and mumble our way out of a job.

    It’s one of the reasons that so many copywriters avoid answering the phone altogether. They remove their numbers from their websites and cross their bum cheeks that the client will email them instead.

    So in this post I’d like to share my top tips on delaying the price quote conversation until the point where you feel comfy quoting.

     

    Why should we avoid talking pricing on the phone?

    Put simply, if you start talking about cost up front – before you establish your value – you risk turning yourself and your services into a commodity.

    The client thinks only about the end invoice rather than about the potential return on investment.

    If you quote an hourly rate, you risk being dragged into the race to the bottom caused by sites like Fiverr. Your hourly rate simply can’t compete with the prices quoted by people living in countries with a lower cost of living.

    Even if you give a fixed-price quote – without context it’s meaningless.
    Quoting $XX for a 5-page website might seem simple and make it easier for a client to compare your quote with others, but they need to know what’s included.

    Does the quote include:

    • Research time – how much? How many competitor sites will you review?
    • Meeting and discussion time – in person or online?
    • Rounds of amends – if so, how many?
    • Proofing – if so, how many rounds?
    • Optimisation – if you’re writing web copy, will you also research keywords, optimise title tags and meta descriptions?

    And the list goes on.

    We need to delay the conversation until we’ve shown the client how our services can really benefit their business.

    So, here are five simple tactics to avoid the dreaded price conversation:

     

    Delay tactic 1: Show your value on your website

    Obviously it’s a great idea to include examples of clients who’ve had similar issues and how you helped them.

    This can be done with testimonials, videos, case studies, and copywriting samples.

    Ensure you cover your customer’s potential barriers to using your services:

    • Talk about time saved.
    • Talk about money saved.
    • Explain how it helped their business.
    • Explain how it made them feel.
    • Explain the problems you solved, that they couldn’t.

    If you have percentages and figures, great, but even if you don’t, you can talk in a general way and impress them.

     

    Delay tactic 2: Include simple pricing on your website

    I recommend trialling having a few simple packages explained on your website together with pricing.

    Be sure you show all inclusions, rounds of amends and discussion time.

    It also helps to have comparison packages, so people can self select the package they want.

    Here’s an amazing example of pricing handled well by Copywriter – Anna Butler at Copybreak.

    Copywriting rates

    You don’t have to price everything you do – just pick a few types of jobs that you do frequently and they will act as a guide for your other work.

    Here’s an example from my copywriting site – a little out of date – it illustrates one way to show the inclusions in your packages.

    katetoon pricing

     

    Delay tactic 3: Diffuse the situation

    While we’re not trying to be slippery, it’s fine to tell the client that you’re not comfortable quoting until you have a more detailed idea of the job.

    Take some time to explain to the client why certain types of quotes don’t work.

    • Quoting by the word: Bad idea, sometimes the shorter the copy the better. I always mention the Nike ‘Just Do It’ tagline – only three words, but three words that transformed their business and branding.
    • Quoting by the hour: Bad idea, how can the client possibly know how long it takes you to write their copy. Yes, it may help them to compare your rate with someone else’s, but what if they are super slow and you are super fast?

    Explain that all projects are different and that you’ll need to know some basics – such as number of pages, number of words, rounds of amends, etc., before you can confidently come back with a price

     

    Delay tactic 4: Talk in ballparks

    If a client pushes for a price on the phone, give them a ballpark. Because yes, although all projects are a bit different, they’re not THAT different. You should be able to provide a rough guide.

    Keep the ballpark nice and wide. Gauge their reaction. It’s amazing how many clients say they don’t have a budget but suddenly do when you give them a figure!

    “Without a project scope, it’s hard to quote accurately, but I’ve worked on previous similar projects and they’ve come in at between $1K and $2K”

    To give ballparks it’s a good idea to have your rates worked out and your rate card worked out (grab our template here), this doesn’t have to be something you share publicly, but it’s great to have one on hand so you can provide quick answers.

    Keep the ballparks fairly wide – so that you have wiggle room later.

     

    Delay tactic 5: Talk comparisons

    I’ve never tried this tactic, but I know other copywriters swear by it. Basically you make light of the question as an avoidance tactic.

    “It will cost more than a cappuccino, but less than a car. Should we discuss your requirements more fully before we talk about cost?”

     

    If the worst should happen

    If you do get cornered into giving a quote, it’s not the end of the world.

    Go ahead with the quoting and proposal stages, and if your quote comes out higher and the client takes issue with this, simply explain why:

    “When I gave you a cost on the phone I didn’t have all the facts, now I know that you need XX pages and this many rounds of amends, I’ve included that in my costs. If the cost is too high, how about we chat through the scope of the project and see what we can do to make it fit within your budget.”

     

    A post shared by Kate Toon (@katetoon) on

     

    When talking price is a good thing

    At some point the price issue is going to come up; you can’t avoid it forever.

    If you have a steady workflow and are confident about your prices, why not talk about them on the phone?

    Talking pricing can get rid of tyre kickers quickly and save you heaps of time writing proposals for jobs that will never happen.

    Is it better to discover you’re too expensive for them now, before you waste heaps of each other’s time?

     


    Our goal as copywriters is to satisfy our potential customer’s desire for pricing information without shooting ourselves in the foot. We want to delay talking about price until we’ve had a chance to show them how our product can benefit the client’s business.

     

    Over to you

    When do you discuss price? What are your tactics for avoiding the uncomfy conversations? Leave a comment below.

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    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

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    Copywriting clients: Relationships versus one night stands

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Job posted: 02/08/16

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Which is better for your business?

    It’s not too much of a stretch to see that working with copywriting clients is a bit like dating. In this post I’m going to take you through the different kinds of copywriting relationships you can form, and the positives and negatives of each one.

    Let’s get started.

     

    The pre client phase

    When you’re fresh to the dating scene it can be hard to know where to start.

    First you give sites like Upwork a go, the freelancer equivalent of Tinder.
    You suffer the humiliation of getting paid 7 cents for 500 words and fear the swipe left of rejection.

    Then you do work for friends, and friends of friends, not unlike being set up with a blind date.
    Sometimes it’s awesome, often it’s awkward. You’re not a good fit and you both know it.

    And of course there are the networking events, like shuffling round a nightclub, clutching a rum and coke, hoping to be noticed.

    It’s all kinds of depressing.

    You have to kiss a lot of copywriting frogs to win your first proper client and when you do, it doesn’t get any easier – sorry folks.

     

    The first date

    When you win your first client, it’s just an awesome feeling. You’re flirtatious on the phone and promise them the world. Anything is possible.

    You show them the best bits of your portfolio like pulling your best outfits from the wardrobe.

    And of course you make an extra effort to make sure everything is perfect.

    Your copy legs are waxed, and your copy underwear is fresher than fresh.

    Everything you provide to them is thoughtful, proof read to the max and polished perfectly.

    But what next?

     

    The copywriting one-night stand

    For many of us the copy dating stops there. We are one-night stand copywriters.
    The job comes in, we do the work and then we wave ‘bye bye’.

    Sure it was fun, but we’re not about to ask the client to sleep over and breakfast is definitely not on the cards.

    There are lots of pros to copywriting one-night stands:

    • Cash flow: Smaller jobs can be turned around quickly keeping your bank balance healthy.
    • Testimonials and portfolio: the more jobs you do, the faster you’ll fill up your sample case.
    • Efforts: Since it’s a one off you can work hard, but not stress too much, as you’re not hoping to lure the client back.
    • Appearance: With shorter copy relationships there’s not time for the client to see your flaws.
    • Variety: With fresh topics to write about each week, you’re unlikely to get bored or get stuck in a particular industry writing rut.

    So, as you can see, one-night stand copy jobs can be a great way to keep your workflow chugging along and your creativity blooming.

    Some negatives include:

    • Hustle: Without regular certain work, you’re continually having to market yourself and hustle for new jobs.
    • Admin: The more jobs you go for, the more proposals you have to write, the more briefs you have to take – which all takes your focus away from writing.

    But of course you have to ask yourself: why are some copywriters only good for a one off job while others can persuade clients to bend the knee and pop the question?

     

    The copywriting relationship

    If that first job was a hit, you may find the client comes back for more and is keen to have a long-term writing relationship.

    This can be a huge boost to the ego. It’s hugely flattering to have a client love your work so much they return for more.

    The pros of a long-term relationship are:

    • Ease: Working with the client becomes easier, you know their quirks and they know your processes.
    • Confidence: The more you write for a particular client or industry, the more familiar you become with the tone and the subject matter.
    • Time: As you know the client you’ll spend less time researching, briefing and discussing and more time writing.
    • Admin: With long term clients there’s not really the need to spec out every job with a proposal, instead you can shoot them a simple invoice.
    • Cash flow: Often clients are keen to set up retainer agreements which means you have regular money coming in at the start of each month.

    Some negatives include:

    • Tedium: Sometimes it can be hard to write about the same subject year in and year out.

    For example, I spent 3 years writing email copy for a tech company, the information was essentially the same each week, but the client was keen for it to sound fresh. In the end I was simply shuffling words around with a heavy heart.

    • Warts and all: The longer you work with someone the more likely they are to see your flaws. You’ll probably have to cancel meetings and push back jobs due to life getting in the way. You’ll have off days, you’ll produce bad copy, and the client will get on your nerves.

    Just like a real relationship, copywriting relationships take work to make them successful.

    If you prefer the sound of copy relationships I have two notes of caution:

    1. Make sure you choose the client: Just because a client wants to metaphorically date you, doesn’t mean you have to say yes. The attraction must be mutual.
    2. Know when to let go: All good things come to an end and you need to be honest with yourself about your copywriting relationship. If things are feeling stale it’s better to let the client go, before they turn rotten.

     

    The best of both worlds 

    When it comes to copywriting relationships I’m a cheating, serial monogamist.

    That sounds bad, right?
    But let me explain.

    A photo posted by Kate Toon (@katetoon) on

    I find what works best for me is:

    1. Multiple partners: Work with two or three clients at once, so that while I’m waiting for feedback on one job, I can be working on another.
    2. Copy cheats: Mix one-night stand style jobs with longer relationships, so while I’m waiting for that second payment on the 60 day government job, I can feed myself with the little mini jobs that pop up along the way.
    3. Long distance relationships: I have a number of clients who’ve been working with me for 4-5 years, but they don’t have work every week. Rather it’s like a long distance thing where we don’t see each other in months but then just click back in to where we were.

    Personally although I love the regular dosh, retainers don’t work for me. I don’t like the pressure to show up and be awesome every month.

    So there you go, a dating metaphor spread (thinly) over an entire blog post.

     

     

    Over to you

    What type of copywriting relationships do you prefer? Please tell me in the comments below:

    Long description :

    MORE DETAILS

    Contact details:

    Contact Name:

    Contact Phone:

    Contact Email:

    Contact Website:

    Cart

    Want to be a successful copywriter?

    We help aspiring copywriters build a thriving copywriting business, hone their writing skills, make connections and boost their confidence.

    Copy Shop







    Copywriter finances: What you need to know

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

    JOB DETAILS

    Job status: Open

    Job posted: 11/07/16

    Industry:

    Type:

    Deadline:

    Budget:

    Location:

    Brief:

    Managing your finances is one of the biggest challenges copywriters face.

    I’ve personally struggled to work out what I should be paying when, what I can claim for, and whether I’m actually making a profit.

    That’s why Belinda Weaver and I decided to interview Karen Goad for our Hot Copy podcast. You can head over to iTunes to listen to the podcast, or check out our interview below if you’re more of a reader.

    Please note: This information relates to Australia. Some of our tips will hopefully be useful to listeners in other countries. But be advised that every country has different tax laws, and you should consult your local accountant for more information.

    And remember: This information does NOT constitute financial advice for copywriters

     

    Karen goadWho is Karen Goad?

    Karen is a small business owner and founder of Goad Accountants and Simply Business Bookkeeping. Simply Business Bookkeeping is an accounting group that specialises in helping business owners know their business better throughup-to-date financial information for better decision making and accurate GST, CGT and income tax advice.

    Karen has more than 18 years’ experience working in public practice with small business ranging from startups and sole traders to businesses with more than $20 million in turnover.

    HC:      Most copywriters set themselves up as Sole Traders. But is there any value in going with a PTY LTD or family trust structure? What are the tax implications? 

    KG:      We get this question quite frequently from sole traders. Before we discuss the tax implications, I’ll just briefly talk about them from a legal side of things.

    A PTY LTD or corporate trust structure may have asset protection benefits, meaning the business owner’s personal assets may be protected if they business was to end badly or litigation was involved. This is something a legal guru could expand on.

    From a tax perspective, a PTY LTD or company is a tax-paying entity. Currently, for small business companies with turnover of $2 million and under, the company tax rate is a flat 28.5%, falling to 27.5% from 1 July. The top marginal tax rate for individuals is 47%, so one of the obvious advantages of a company is the tax rate.

    However, in Australia individuals are taxed on a progressive basis. So the tax rate increases from 0% at income levels up to $18,200, to 45% for taxable income over $180,000. For a company to be worthwhile from a tax point of view, the net profit needs to exceed around $105,000 before the individual’s average tax rate exceeds 27.5%.

    A family trust, or discretionary trust, is a different business structure that, with a corporate trustee, can also provide asset protection advantages. But unlike a company, a trust doesn’t pay tax itself. Instead it passes its net income through to its beneficiaries. A family trust lets you have flexibility in who income may be distributed to. So where you have multiple beneficiaries, you can take advantage of different tax threshold to minimise overall tax. A trust can be very beneficial, but Part IVA (the Tax Act’s anti-avoidance rules) may apply if you’re distributing income generated by an individual to a range of different family members to gain a tax benefit.

    The tax rules around the use of companies and trusts are fairly complex. And because everyone’s business and personal circumstances are different, it’s vital that you speak with an accountant that knows your situation.

    HC:      Okay, now on to accounting platforms. What are your favourites? I know Kate and I both use and love XERO. From an accountant’s point of view, are some tools better than others. Or no tools?

    KG:      Xero is definitely my favourite, and for good reason. It’s simple to use and built with business owners in mind rather than accountants, which makes it great for small businesses to get started on. It also has great time-saving features such as data feeds and an easy-to-understand bank reconciliation screen. Personally I love the nifty features that help our clients get paid faster, such as emailing out invoices with links to pay online using Paypal or Stripe and auto invoice reminders.

    But Xero isn’t for everyone, whether it’s from a budget perspective or it just doesn’t gel with the business owner. There are many alternative software options for small businesses, and we have clients on MYOB, QuickBooks, Reckon, and even free software such as Wave.

    As a minimum, if you’re choosing accounting software you should be looking for an online or cloud-based option with automatic bank feeds. It must also be capable of producing a profit and loss report so you can reflect on your progress during the year.

    Other than our love for Xero, we don’t necessarily recommend one software option over another. But we strongly recommend you either hire a bookkeeper to ensure record keeping is done correctly, or obtain some training in your specific software to ensure what you are producing is accurate for you and your accountant at the end of the financial year.

    For clients who are just starting out and don’t want to invest in Xero or other software, we’ve developed an Excel spreadsheet cashbook where they can record all of their business income and expenses. I’m happy to share this with anyone needing to get started with record keeping.

    HC:      Okay, let’s start with GST. In Australia, all businesses have to pay Goods and Services Tax (like VAT in the UK). GST needs to be paid when we reach a certain income level, right? What is that income level?

    KG:      Yes, that’s correct. In Australia businesses must register and pay GST on their sales when their current or projected annual turnover reaches $75,000 or more.

    HC:      And if I reach the GST threshold partway through the year, do I have to register for GST for the whole financial year or just from when I reach the threshold?

    KG:      Essentially, if you’re required to register at any point in time, you pay GST on all sales from that point forward. However, there is sometimes a difference between when a person physically registers for GST and when you are actually required to register. And this comes down to working out when you meet the GST threshold of $75,000.

    To work this out, we need to look at two tests, and if your turnover is $75,000 or more under either one then you must be registered from that point in time. The two tests are:

    1. The “current turnover” test — your turnover for the current month and the previous 11 months.
    2. The “projected turnover” — your total turnover for the current month and the next 11 months.

    For either test, if your turnover is likely to be $75,000 or more then you must register for GST.

    HC:      Some copywriters believe that not charging GST makes them look small-time, and that charging it makes them look more professional. So they charge it anyway and pass it all on to the government. What are your thoughts on this?

    KG:      This is a common concern for small and micro business in general, particularly sole traders. As the GST threshold is so well known, by not being registered for GST you are immediately holding up a flag saying “I’m a small guy”. In different industries this can be “make or break” for landing a new client, so we see sole traders wanting to register for GST from very early on in their business journey.

    But being registered for GST can be cumbersome as you need to not only prepare and lodge a BAS each quarter, but also make sure you have the available cash to pay that BAS.

    I would recommend that where your client base is small, or you have a micro business that on average isn’t registered for GST for consumers, that you remain not registered for GST as long as you can.

    But if you’re dealing mostly with larger businesses registered for GST, and feel that not registering for GST yourself will hinder your growth efforts, then register for it and add 10% to your current prices. Don’t try to absorb all or part of the GST yourself.

    HC:     When is a good time for sole traders to review their accounting setup? What sort of turnover should they have, both in terms of their own income and their family income?

    KG:      Good question, Belinda. There is probably two key points in time when a sole trader should examine their accounting setup.

    The first is at startup, when they’re just starting their business. They should have a chat with an accountant about the best structure to start with, when to register for GST. and record keeping issues.

    The second is when their business is expanding fairly rapidly.

    HC:      When is a good time to change? What are the flags?

    KG:      Some of the flags that a detailed chat with your accountant may be needed and a possible change may be required include:

    • When you’re getting close to meeting the GST threshold
    • When your net profit is around the $80,000 to $100,000 range
    • When your family income is or exceeds $180,000.

    HC:      Okay, so what can we claim? We know that many copywriters work from home, so what can they claim in relation to that? If they have a study where they work, can they claim for that part of their mortgage? Or are any tax benefits actually offset by capital gains tax? 

    KG:      Home office expenses can be a significant portion of business-related tax deductions for copywriters and creative businesses using a home office. However, there’s a distinction between a “home office” and your home being a “place of business”.

    If it’s a home office and you perform some work there but otherwise operate from a commercial office or serviced office, then your deductions are limited to a “cents per hour” claim for:

    • heating and cooling
    • depreciation on home office equipment
    • telephone and internet usage.

    If it’s a place of business (i.e. you only operate from home and do substantial work there), then you may be eligible to claim what we call “occupancy costs”—a proportion of rates and insurance, as well as a percentage of interest on the mortgage (or the rent if you aren’t a homeowner). And this is on top of the business percentage of electricity, gas, water bills, rates, depreciation, telephone and internet costs.

    The downside of operating from home is the potential CGT implications. In Australia you can generally ignore a capital gain or loss you make when you sell your home or main residence. However, when you use it as a place of business or for income producing purposes the full exemption may be reduced, and on disposal of your home you may have a partially assessable capital gain.

    There may be a tax and cash flow benefit of claiming a percentage of the mortgage interest, rates and insurance now, but it’s the future unknown quantity of the assessable capital gain that can put people off doing so.

    No matter whether you have a “home office” or a “place of business”, you should determine the proportion of the floor space your dedicated office takes up to enable you to proportion your deductions correctly.

     

    HC:      There’s a persistent rumour that us creative types can claim all kinds of creative activities. I write for a living, so can I claim my Kindle purchases? And what about movies?

    KG:      To work out if you have a valid tax deduction you should ask yourself, “Would I be incurring this expense if I didn’t operate my business?” If the answer is “Yes” then it’s likely to be a business deduction.

    As for Kindle purchases, if it’s reference books or guides these will generally always be deductible. Movies and fiction books would need to be considered on a case-by-case basis. If you do have an expense like this, that may be questionable as to whether its personal or business. Keep a notation on the invoice as to why you purchased it and how it relates to a current job or prospective client.

    HC:      Now onto superannuation, which for our overseas listeners is a government-supported pension scheme here in Australia. Most people put 10% of their salary into super, right?

    The Government will put in a co-contribution of up to $500. But this is only for low- and middle-income earners (i.e. a taxable income of less than $50,454, with the entitlement reducing by 33 cents for every dollar over $35,454), and needs a super contribution of $500. And you can’t claim a tax deduction for the super contribution.

    HC:      As a sole trader I’m not legally obligated to pay super, am I?

    KG:      That’s correct. As a sole trader there is currently no obligation for a business owner to contribute to super. But it should be considered as an overall part of your retirement and investment planning though.

     

    HC:      What should sole traders know about putting money into super for themselves?

    KG:      From a tax perspective, you’re responsible for making your own contributions. To claim a tax deduction for personal super contributions made for the current 2016 financial year, you need to meet what we call the 10% rule. This means that if 10% or more of your assessable income comes from salary or wages from an employer, then you won’t be eligible to claim a tax deduction. This rules applies even if the rest of your assessable income comes from running your own business.

    Just as a side note, the 10% rule may be removed from the 2018 financial year, as announced in the Federal Budget, if the Coalition wins the upcoming 2016 Federal Election.

    The most important step in ensuring you can claim a tax deduction for your super contributions is to ensure you pay the contribution before 30 June. It must reach the fund by 30 June, so allow at least 3-7 days if using electronic transfer.

    HC:      Are there any tax incentives open to low income earners? Say, copywriters in their first year of business?

    KG:      Australia has a progressive tax system, which means low income earners have a reduced tax liability. The current tax rates mean that individuals with taxable income of $18,200 or less pay no tax. Depending on family income, with low income tax offsets an individual could earn up to approximately $20,500 without incurring a tax liability.

    A word of warning for those starting up their copywriting business while transitioning from employment. If you incur a loss from your business, and want to apply that loss against your wages, you need to meet a few criteria. One is that your assessable income from business for the year was $20,000 or greater. If not, you may be required to quarantine that business loss and use it in a future income year.

    HC:      Let’s talk about depreciable assets—computers, furniture etc. Sandy Forbes Taylor wants to know what the dollar limit is for assets that you can claim 100% in the same year.

    KG:      The general limit for assets has been $1,000 or less for small business entities. The cost is the GST inclusive price less any GST your business is eligible to claim.

    These assets can be written off as a tax deduction in the year they are incurred.

    HC:      There’s lot of talk about the small business $20,000 and asset depreciation here in Australia. But how does that really apply to sole traders?

    KG:      Yes, there’s currently a lot of end-of-financial-year advertising for the $20,000 “instant asset write-off” from car dealers and tech stores as we lead up to 30 June.

    The $20,000 is an increased threshold, up from the $1,000. It’s available to all small business entities—sole traders, companies, partnerships and trusts. It’s not a bonus tax deduction, but rather brings forward the depreciation on business assets into the year it is acquired.

    The $20,000 is also the GST-inclusive cost of the asset less any GST tax credits the business is entitled to claim.

    To give you an example, let’s say a sole trader has a taxable income of $98,000 and acquires a $20,000 business asset. At that income level, the asset deduction will result in a reduced taxable income of $78,000 and reduce the tax payable by approximately $7,710 in that year.

    HC:      So what can I actually buy? And when does it end?

    KG:      The increased threshold applies for the current 2016 financial year, and expires at the end of the next financial year (30 June 2017).

    You can use the $20,000 immediate asset deduction to acquire business assets such as new computers, TVs, iPads, office furniture, software and motor vehicles. Even Xboxes or PlayStations for employee lunch rooms would be eligible for businesses that employ staff.

    If an asset is used for both personal and business purposes, then the deduction will need to be apportioned to exclude the personal use of the purchased asset.

    HC:      A little personal story here is my She shed, which is kinda famous. It cost me around $15k and I thought I could claim this all back. But I couldn’t. I was gutted. Can you explain why I couldn’t Karen?

    Yeah, certainly Kate. Essentially your She Shed is a building structure and falls under different depreciation rules called “capital works”. Capital works for building and structural improvements are depreciated under a different section of the Tax Act and aren’t eligible for the $20,000 immediate write-off, which is why the construction of your She Shed was ineligible. Instead it is depreciated at just 2.5% of the building cost each year, which is significantly less of a tax benefit then the $20,000 immediate asset write-off.

    HC:      What about Cars? Can I claim that as a deduction (or bikes?)

    KG:      Yes, motor vehicles or bikes that come under the $20,000 threshold can be claimed in full in the year incurred. As mentioned earlier, if the car is used partly for private use a sole trader will need to apportion the deduction.

    To determine the business use percentage, a motor vehicle log book should be kept for the vehicle in the year it is purchased. That means starting a log book now before 30 June, and maintaining it for 12 weeks to enable a business percentage to be determined.

    HC:      Again in Australia, there’s something called the Medicare levy. Can you explain what this is, Karen?

    KG:      The Medicare Levy is an additional tax on taxable incomes that was implemented to partly fund our Medicare system that provides free or low-cost medical for Australians. The current Medicare Levy rate is 2%, and is paid by all taxpayers with income of more than $20,896 (or $35,261 for couples).

    HC:      I recently had to start paying it for my entire family. Can you explain why, Karen?

    KG:      No worries, Kate. As your family income exceeded a certain threshold, you were paying an additional Medicare Levy Surcharge of 1% because you did not hold private hospital insurance that covered all your dependents (e.g. spouses and children).

    The “all” part is critical. Even if you hold a single policy but your spouse has no cover, you both would still be liable to pay the surcharge. Now that you have taken out private hospital insurance for the entire family, you will not be slugged the additional surcharge from the time the family policy commenced.

    The Medicare Levy Surcharge is an additional levy from 1% to 1.5%, designed to push high-income earners into taking out private hospital cover for their family.

    HC:      Karen is actually my accountant, and as she knows I’m always asking for a pat on the back when it comes to earnings and profitability.

    KG:      And you’re doing a fantastic job this year Kate, as always.

     

    HC:      What sort of ratios in terms of sales versus net profit should we be looking at? In other words, what are the signs that my business expenses are too high?

    KG:      One of the biggest items we like to educate clients on is monitoring their own income, expenses and profit during the year, and comparing it to prior years and future budgeted figures as well. When you become familiar with what your profit and loss items generally look like each month, you can spot when expenses are getting too high or income is dropping too low.

    Generally, copywriters don’t have significant overheads, and expenses are generally along the lines of home office, subscriptions, and sub-contractors if they use them.

    In terms of comparing businesses to an industry average, we see a net profit percentage around the 50-75% mark to be around the norm. If you use subcontractors in your business, then the net profit percentage is generally at the lower end.

    What I would suggest is if your net profit is below these benchmarks then it’s a good time to review your financials with an accountant or bookkeeper. It may be a simple case of inaccurate record keeping, or a sign you need to review your expenses and business model going forward.

     

    Over to you

    Do you have any other copywriter financial questions? If so please post below.

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    How much do copywriters charge?

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
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        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
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    Job application rules and guidelines

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      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
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    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

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    Today, I’m going to be answering the question:

    ‘How much do copywriters charge’,

    and on the flip side, how much should you charge for your copywriting work if you are a copywriter.

    The price a copywriter charges depends hugely on the country in which you live and where you get your copy from. On sites like Fiverr and Upwork, it’s easy to get a 500-word article, for example, for as little as $10 or $20, but of course the quality varies too. Often you’ll find these articles are written by people who have English as a second language, and sometimes the copy has been duplicated from a previous article or from somewhere else on the internet, so it’s always a good idea to check the copy that you get from sites like this using a tool like Copyscape.

     

    Watch the video:

     

     

     

    The price a copywriter charges will also be influenced by a number of other factors. These include location, so metro copywriters seem to charge a bit more than those in rural areas, and obviously experience level: a brand new copywriter is going to charge a lot less than a copywriter with five to 10 years’ experience. Also, some copywriters charge less for working with start-ups and offer discounts for charities as well. The type of copy you want written will also be a factor: annual reports can be kind of expensive, blog posts, not so much. Another factor to consider is demand: a copywriter who has a long waiting list and lots of eager clients might charge a little bit more than somebody who has no waiting list at all.

    Another factor is turnaround time, so if you need your copy in a hurry you may find that your copywriter charges a rush rate which is often around 25% of the overall project fee, that’s why it’s better to brief in your copy as early as possible.

    Unlike journalists, most copywriters don’t charge by the word, instead they use an hourly rate through which to calculate a fixed price. They’ll generally ask you to complete a brief that outlines what the project is going to involve, the number of pages and exactly what you’re after. They’ll use that to put together a fixed price quote that will include a set amount of amends, discussion time and proofreading. Fixed price quotes tend to work better for clients because they know exactly what they are in for, for the whole project.

    Most copywriters in Australia will also charge a 50% deposit: this is to split the risk, so you’re trusting them to write the copy for you and they’re trusting that you’ll pay them at the end of project. Also, most copywriters in Australia will be charging you GST on top of the price.

    In terms of hourly rate, at the time of making this video, which is June 2016, the rates in Australia are something like this: for a newbie copywriter you’re looking at anything from around $50-$80 an hour; a mid-level copywriter, probably around $100 to $130 an hour; and the super experienced copywriter with years under their belt can charge anything from $150 an hour upwards. There are many copywriters who charge thousands of dollars to write you a Sales page or a Home page, and that’s because, obviously, if it converts, your return on investment is going to be huge.

    If you’re a copywriter watching this video, you can head to The Clever Copywriting School website and check out the Recommended Rates page where I’ve detailed all this information for you. You can also download our rate card which is a really great way of helping clients understand what you charge for different types of projects, press releases, blogs, websites – you name it, they’re all on that rate card.

    If you are a client watching this, then I highly recommend you head over to The Clever Copywriting School website directory page where you’ll find over 50 Australian copywriters ready to do your work for you, at all different price points.

    My recommendation is this: if you are a client, make sure you get at least three quotes for your copywriting project, and ask for recommendations from other small business people who’ve had a good experience with that copywriter.

    Generally, when it comes to copy, you do get what you pay for but you don’t have to pay the Earth.

     

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    How to make $2000 an hour as a copywriter

    How to apply

    1. Read through the job description below carefully and ask yourself:
      1. Do you have relevant experience?
      2. Can you meet the deadline or feel confident negotiating it?
      3. Can you meet the budget or feel confident negotiating it?
        If the answers are all ‘YES’ move to step 2.
    2. Send your best possible pitch to the email address included in the job description below. Introduce yourself, sell yourself!
    3. There’s no need to cc us, but of course we’d love to know if you win the job, please tell us in the TCCS Facebook group

    Job application rules and guidelines

    1. Jobs will be posted on this page as they come in.
    2. The TCCS rules still apply:
      1. Please only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in.
      2. Do not apply for every single job – you will ruin the quality of the replies for the job poster and as a consequence, we’re likely to get few jobs posted.
      3. We will be monitoring responses by following up with job posters to assess quality.  If we find that members have been applying for jobs for which they’re not a good fit, their access to the job board will be limited. 

         

    3. Jobs will be open for a maximum of 48 hours, fewer if the enquirer has advised they’ve received enough responses.

      Suggested format for emails:

      Hi Bob.
      I saw your job post on The Clever Copywriting School Job board.

      Reason for applying:
      Name:
      TCCS Directory link: (Annual members only)
      Website:
      Email:

      Phone:

      Thanks
      Your name

       

    Happy pitching and as always, if you have any questions or technical difficulty, please email admin@clevercopywritingschool.com

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    Or, the two essential skills every copywriter needs

    What does it take to be an awesome copywriter?

    • A firm grasp of grammar?
    • A bookshelf full of copywriting books?
    • Or, a lever arch file packed with course notes?

    I’d argue it’s none of these. 

    In this article I’m going to share, what I think, are most important skills a copywriter needs, not just to write well but to guarantee a fabulous income.

     

    But first a little about me

    Unlike many copywriters out there I am not classically trained. I’ve never done a copywriting workshop, an ecourse or a correspondence course.

    Yes, I studied English at Uni, but it was more poetry and plays than paragraphs and proof reading.

    I’m not much of a copywriting book reader either. While many others swear by Bob Bly and his ilk, the closest I’ve gotten to reading about the craft of copywriting is flicking through a dictionary.

     

    So, you may ask, do I deserve to even call myself a copywriter?

    Well yes, I learned at the copywriting coalface – when I switched from my production role into a full time copywriter role. It started at Ogilvy where I was lucky enough to work on some fairly major brands, and then I went on to write copy at several UK agencies, before eventually turning back to production.

    I had several smashing creative partners, some amazing teams to work with and a few clever and insightful Creative Directors (it has to be said many creative directors can be a touch painful to work with – so I got lucky).

    I learned to:

    • Work under pressure.
    • Integrate the client brief
    • Ask the tough questions
    • Pull creative concepts out of my butt crack

    I also learned to edit, proof, perfect, define, expand, drill down, negotiate, take criticism, work with others, and brainstorm like a master.

    So yes, I learned a heap of things in these roles but I still don’t think that any of these are essential to developing copywriting skills.

    In fact I believe it was when I was a lowly receptionist, working for a pittance in some god-awful National Health Service office that I discover this one vital skill.

    It was when I was typing up those endlessly dull memos (this was pre emails) and reports that I honed my copywriting craft.

     

    You see I think the most important copywriting skill is this…

    You need to type fast.

    Yep, that’s it.

    Disappointed?

    Don’t be. Let me explain.

    My typing speed currently stands at around 90 wpm.

    Don’t believe me? Here’s a graphic to prove this.

    Kate Toon Typing Speed

    This means that when I’m on the ball I can type up a 400-word page in around 6 minutes.

     

    What’s your speed?

    If you’re not sure what you’re typing speed is you can take the test below:

    Psst: If the test isn’t showing up- just head here to complete it.

    No, I don’t charge by the word, I charge a fixed price per page, per website or per job.

    But let’s do the maths: If an average web page is 400 words, and you’re charging say $200ish per page – well that 90 wpm typing speed means you’re making around $2000 an hour.

    Let me repeat. That’s $2000 an hour!

    If I was good at sums I’d tell you based on that, what you could earn in a day, a week or a year. But I’m a words person, so you’ll have to work it out yourself.

    Okay, okay. I know that’s ridiculous.

    Those 6 minutes don’t take into account: briefing, reading, thinking, editing and proofing time.

    They don’t factor in the admin, making cups of tea, walking the dog or putting a load of washing in.

    But you see here’s the trick.

    Along with typing fast the other skill I think a copywriter needs is the ability to cut the crap and get the hell on with it.

    In my opinion too many writers spend too much time faffing about. They’re wasting time stressing about perfecting the perfect brand message, debate the quintessential tone of voice, researching a zillion competitor websites, and asking the client 9087 questions.

    They fret that they’re not good enough, they whine about writers block, they struggle to find motivation and inspiration and determination. They fanny around on social media, they chat in forums and they clean the bathroom. They do anything to avoid actually writing.

     

    You see after being able to type like a maniac the next skill a copywriter needs is to get stuck in.

    It’s a principle a lot of good writers use.

    (I know this ‘cos I was talking to Glenn Murray just the other day and he told me so.)

    When I get a new project, of course I ask questions, of course I do a little research and of course I grab a giant coffee and have a wee before I start.

    But then, then people I WRITE.

    I take that blank page and I write all over it.

    I write bullets, I write snippets, I write random verbs, quotes, thoughts, ideas, headlines, bullets and even the occasional full sentence.

    I write whatever comes into my head and I write it FAST.

    I don’t second-guess myself, I don’t edit, and heck I don’t even spell check. I just write. Whatever spews forth out of my cerebellum ends up on the page.

    And that super fast typing speed means I can type as fast as I think – almost, I think my brain is more like 120 words per minute – or at least that’s what my husband says.

    I get it down and I get it done.

    I can polish off a first draft of a 10 page website in a couple of hours.

    Yes it’s messy, even a bit crap. But crap and written down is better than perfect and still in your brain.

    I have the raw material on the page and the whole white page horror is dissipated.

    And now the much easier process of polishing and editing can begin.

    So that’s it people.

    • LEARN TO TYPE.
    • GET STUCK IN.

    Two skills every copywriter needs to have.

    And yes, I know I know, it was a terribly click baity title. And I know that noone could really type so fast and write so well they’d earn $2000 an hour. But I hope you still learned a thing, or two.

    Once you do know your rates why not create your own Copywriting Rate card?

     

    Over to you

    What do you think is the most important skill a copywriter needs? And what, come on tell me, is your typing speed!

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